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Thread: How strong should my anchor chain breakaway be?

  1. #1
    Member Maast's Avatar
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    Default How strong should my anchor chain breakaway be?

    I'm using a loop of 650lb net cord; the two legs of the cord should be giving me 1200-1300 lbs of break strength.

    I'm using 1/2 inch 8 plait (6300lb break strength) attached to 1/4" high test galvanized chain (10K lb break) and a rocna 22lb anchor.

    Estimated boat weight is about 5500 lbs loaded.

    I'm wondering if my breakaway is too strong, getting that net cord to pop could be a real challange if I need to unstick my anchor. Something I've noticed is that rocna will set itself at almost any scope, it even set when I dropped it straight down just to keep from drifting. Because it sets so easy I'm thinking unsticking my anchor might be a common thing for me.

    Whatcha think?
    2696 Sea Raider Pilothouse
    "Dominion"

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    Default

    PS

    I think I should have a anchor chain swivel too, anybody use one? Worth it?
    2696 Sea Raider Pilothouse
    "Dominion"

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    Question Good idea

    I don't have a swivel, but I am noticing the twist in my rode lately. Swivel idea might be a good idea. What kind of swivel would work good?

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    Default

    I started using s/s lock wire a few years ago and it works great. its fast to get re-rigged and you dont have to worry about knots and the cord getting chafed. I use 3-4 wraps and that seems to works. I think 2 wraps would be plenty using the cord.

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    Default I was taught that

    the anchor needed to be at a 45degree angle to be effective. strait down it's just going to bounc on the floor with the boat, unless it is really heavy.
    Idealy it does not take a heavy anchor to hold a boat under normal cercumstances. In certain cases I would use two.And both of them would be bow and stern, 45 degrees or better, and they didn't weigh 10lbs ea.
    To free them I would loosen one side , move 90 drees over the top of the first and raise it. Lite anchors usually free up easily when you are directly above them. The second anchor is done the same way. We used floating rope, on all the boats in the marina, that way we could recover them if the customer lost it over board or could not bring it up.
    The problem with using something as a fuse or a weak point ,is wear and having to baby sit it each time you cast it over.
    The nice thing about rope over chain is that you can cut it in an emergency, and use it in an emergency for other things.
    Just a thought.

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    Default Swivel

    I had a swivel on my 3-strand, and recommend it for that. But with my new 8-plait, I don't get the twist I got with the 3-strand, and ditched the swivel.

    On the break-away, I've tried the parachute cord and the SS wire. I was always afraid they might break if the weather got snotty. I've been stuck a couple times, but managed to get free. I carry a small mushroom anchor for an emergency. Don't want to have to go home just because I lost my anchor.
    Kingfisher 2525. 225, 20, and 2hp Hondas.

  7. #7

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    Halibut cord and twenty feet of chain.

    If you use a windlass, your anchor, rope, and chain, are probably to small, and you might be one that is nervous about sleeping on your boat and leaving it while hiking on shore.

    If your anchor is large enough and chain long enough, one loop of halibut cord, broken in the middle of the night or not, will hold your boat. I have use zip-ties before, they don't last, but are strong enough if your gear is right.

    Also, how big and strong your boat is will determine if it can break it or not.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    Halibut cord and twenty feet of chain.

    If you use a windlass, your anchor, rope, and chain, are probably to small, and you might be one that is nervous about sleeping on your boat and leaving it while hiking on shore.

    Also, how big and strong your boat is will determine if it can break it or not.
    I have a little 25' tin can boat with a windlass. There is 300' of 1/2" 8-plait line to 50' chain for my rode, attached to a 22# claw anchor. I think I have plenty of chain, but if the twine broke, I would be pulling the claw backwards, and wouldn't count on it to hold in a good williwaw.
    I don't understand why, if I have a windlass, that my stuff is too small? I know my little mushroom with 15' of chain is a little small, but that's not my main.
    Kingfisher 2525. 225, 20, and 2hp Hondas.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    Halibut cord and twenty feet of chain.

    If you use a windlass, your anchor, rope, and chain, are probably to small, and you might be one that is nervous about sleeping on your boat and leaving it while hiking on shore.
    I'd have to disagree that my ground tackle is too small, I could almost literally dangle my boat in the air using my ground tackle. Loaded boat is around 6500lbs and the break point is 6300 for 1/2 inch 8 plait. The 22lb anchor is rated for a 35 foot boat, I'm only 26 - I went up one size for safety.

    I dont think people realize just how strong modern anchor line is, I know I didnt until I started researching before I bought my ground tackle.

    The windlass couldnt take it, but thats why its cleated off overnight or in snotty weather.
    2696 Sea Raider Pilothouse
    "Dominion"

  10. #10

    Default Masst

    Don't sound like it's to small, one think I'd say is light is the chain, heavey chain will keep the head of the anchor down so the hook can do it's job.

    22 or 24 # anchor ? with 1/2" line but to keep the head down I have 40' of 1/2" chain, one length is 100 foot with a eye and 200' with eye and shackle, so if I needed to drop it on the float I'm not waiting for 300 feet to come off!

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    Default

    I read a research paper, and found a couple of other confirmations, that the chain should weigh the same as the anchor, anything more doesnt do much for you, so I did 25 feet which is 24 pounds according to secosouth.
    2696 Sea Raider Pilothouse
    "Dominion"

  12. #12

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    My comment about the windlass and gear being to small;

    I wanted to purchase a windlass some years back, but when I looked into it I discovered a limitation on the thickness and size of the anchor/rode set-up that most windlasses would accomodate, I chose to keep my bigger tackle set-up instead. (Keeping in mind I didn't want to purchase a crane, etc...)

    About once a year on average I have been caught in a storm overnight, some of the tales about dragging anchor have been a reminder that size really does matter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    My comment about the windlass and gear being to small;

    I wanted to purchase a windlass some years back, but when I looked into it I discovered a limitation on the thickness and size of the anchor/rode set-up that most windlasses would accomodate, I chose to keep my bigger tackle set-up instead. (Keeping in mind I didn't want to purchase a crane, etc...)

    About once a year on average I have been caught in a storm overnight, some of the tales about dragging anchor have been a reminder that size really does matter.
    Ah, I see what you meant, I chose the Lewmar 700 specifically because it took 1/2 inch line and not a larger diameter. I wanted to have as much rode as would fit in the locker and 1/2 inch would give me more room.
    It worked too, I've got 625 feet and room for another 200.
    2696 Sea Raider Pilothouse
    "Dominion"

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