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Thread: How well do blacks and browns share?

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    Default How well do blacks and browns share?

    I've enjoyed a lot of great weekends hiking, floating, glassing, and exploring the Kenai Peninsula, and while I've seen plenty of brown fuzzy stuff through the binocs, I've seen next to nothing black. While chatting last weekend with a good ol boy who clearly had more experience hunting than I have at life, I was told that blacks usually don't tend to hang out where a lot of brown bears do. How well do you all think the two flavors typically share an area? Would a high concentration of browns tend to suggest a lower concentration of blacks, or a "beary" area with many of both species present?

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    Brown bears have a tendency to kill and eat black bears given half a chance so ,yes, higher density of browns about makes for a lesser density of blacks, generally speaking.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    POW has all black bears and they do well.Admiralty has all brown bears and they too do well. On Wrangell island and in Haines they tolerate each other.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Talking most brown bears

    don't like other browns - they only get along at a high quantity food source.
    Wait until fall & spend time glassing the Kenai Penn again - there's plenty of black bears there.
    check w/F&G - think they only "offically" claim 300-400 brownies on the Kenai P.
    Gary

  5. #5

    Default grizz and black together

    They will feed together if the black is brave enough and the grizz is not real agrassive. These 2 feed together of and on for about 3 weeks. The mom grizz and cubs I had would not tolerate the black when they were on the bait she always ran him off.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Rkeyser,
    VERY cool pictures. Thanks for sharing!

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    A few years ago I found a grizzly kill, a big mount of dirt, moss, with a moose leg sticking out. The leg still had a wire snare on it, and the snare was still tied to a tree. It seems that the moose was killed by either a black or grizzly bear while sill on the snare. The cow moose had trampled a circle on the ground all around the tree, trying to get away.

    Anyway, my hunting partners and I looked at the kill site, and there was a black bear skull near it. The skull was pretty much clean (no flesh left behind, and bleached). Not far from it there was a black bear paw that had been separated from the leg at the wrist. The paw didn't smell rotten at all, like it had been there maybe for a few hours, and was in perfect shape.

    We concluded that either a black or a grizzly had killed the moose, but that a grizzly had buried it. The grizzly had killed and consumed a black bear (the bare skull) the previous year after the trapper set his trapline (we hunt that area in September). Also, that another black bear had been attracted to the smell the following Fall (August, before moose season), which in turn had been killed and eaten by the grizzly. It's possible that the grizzly decided to take the fresh kill to another location, away from the trail and noise, perhaps just before we found the kill site.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    They have been known to interbreed but its not an everyday thing
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    They seem to co-habitate fairly well in certain areas. Look at the Kenai River/Russian area. I've seen blacks and browns in both areas, close to each other.

    I don't think its the norm, but I think where there are high concentrations of both, they tend to share real estate.

    Tim

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Curious,
    I have seen what appears to be a lot of trail cam photo's of griz on black bear baits, but I have not read many posts where the griz came in while the hunter was there waiting for a black bear.
    Are they much more cautious than a black and maybe do not come into the bait stations much when a human is actually there?
    I have never felt very threatened when coming and going to a bait stand but I have never been around an area that held griz either. I am not sure I would feel very comfortable leaving a site about dark, alone, with the big boys roaming. Yet it does not appear they attack the hunters at these sites?
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Default Thanks

    Thanks for the info, stories, and pics gentlemen. Much appreciated. Gary, I definitely will try again in the fall. If there's one thing I've learned about bear hunting this spring, it's that they rarely break from cover for long. I hope that the fall will provide me with a better opportunity to catch one up high where there is more visibility, as I've learned they feed on berries then. I'd be ivery nterested in learning a bit about how some of your spring hunting versus fall hunting strategies differ. Thanks again.

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