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Thread: New to dipnitting, I have a few ???'s

  1. #1
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    Default New to dipnitting, I have a few ???'s

    Here the quick and dirty:

    Alaskan resident for seven years. Finally here during the season and I want to give it a try.

    I know I need a net, permit, and be down there during the proper "window".

    Do I need a fourwheeler to get back to the river? Can I walk?

    Not looking for your "hot spots" but where do I go? I'm not familiar with the area so do I look for a specific bridge, trail, etc?

    I hope some of you are willing to spread some knowledge my way, thanks a ton in advance!

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    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smallmonzter View Post
    Here the quick and dirty:

    Alaskan resident for seven years. Finally here during the season and I want to give it a try.

    I know I need a net, permit, and be down there during the proper "window".

    Do I need a fourwheeler to get back to the river? Can I walk?

    Not looking for your "hot spots" but where do I go? I'm not familiar with the area so do I look for a specific bridge, trail, etc?

    I hope some of you are willing to spread some knowledge my way, thanks a ton in advance!
    Being from NP and considering the timing of your post (June 10th) is it safe to say you are asking about the Chitina Dipnet Fishery?

    If so PM me and I have a few pointers...
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by smallmonzter View Post
    Do I need a fourwheeler to get back to the river? Can I walk?
    !

    We walk-in 3.1 miles to the Russian River Falls, and Backpack out 100# each, on a fairly good trail. When I get Old, (only 64) I figure to use a wheelbarrow. We get Federal Permits.

  4. #4
    Member mntransplant's Avatar
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    Default Walk the trail

    Yes you can walk. It's pretty far (maybe 4 miles or so) but an easy trail on foot. The hard part is lugging all the fish back. Since the trail is getting kind of tough for four wheelers, it would be a good idea to bring a mountain bike. If you could some how get a trailer for your bike, I think that would be the preferred method. I may be converting from wheeler to bike in the near future due to the deteriorating trail conditions. It's dusty from all the Glacial Silt so bring wet wipes, sunglasses and a towel or something to keep the dust out of your mouth. That being said, if you nring it you will not need it. If you don't bring it, you will neeed it.
    -At what point does "against all enemies foreign and domestic" apply to politicians?

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Drive to Kasilof. Park 50 yards from river. Put on chest waders and walk into the river. Yard out as many fish as you need. Walk back to truck that is parked only 50 yards away. Go process your fish. Couldn't be any easier.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  6. #6

    Default Roger that

    An excellent entrance into the world of dipnetting, JOAT. Quick and easy; no horrendous expenditure of life-threatening energy.

    For more info, read every thread in this forum. Excellent info from many sources, and a great time saver to all. Your questions will be fully answered.

    ~tr

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    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    One tip that would've been great to know when I first started is that you don't scoop or pull the net immediately to try to race the fish to the shore. You lose more that way then about anything else.

    The trick is realizing you are using gill-netting in the majority of nets. The fish hit it and try to keep swimming forward. They will gill themselves, or you can help them out by doing a few push-pull strokes on the net rapidly, and then pull the net in.

    I lost dozens of reds on the Kenai because I couldn't figure out why people were doing that. Turns out they knew what they were doing.


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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    I don't think they use gillnet at Chitna. But I've never had an issue with gillnet on the Kenai/Kasilof. As soon as a fish hits the net, I always "scoop" the net frame by rolling it to a horizontal position. The portion of frame on bottom goes downstream while the upper frame goes upstream and then you hold it with the frame at the surface of the water while you pull it back to you. This captures the fish in the net pouch and there is no way out. The only time I've had a fish escape is when you have multiple fish in the net at once and lose one while extracting another one. I don't worry about those too much. It's too much fun to have 2 or 3 fish in the net at once or to sit there with more fish swimming into your net while you're in the process of removing another one to put on the stringer.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    lol Joat....I know in theory that's how it's supposed to work, but I've lost fish using that technique. Maybe I'm just jaded on the whole Kenai River thing. Too many people, and I've pretty much had miserable luck with timing of fish and wind/waves. I've probably made about a dozen trips in the last few years with a total of about a dozen fish caught, which is so not the worth the expense. One of these days I need to do that with someone who really knows what they are doing or who has a boat and knows what they are doing....even getting a Copper River limit of 30 there would make it pretty cost-effective.

    My Copper River net is a gill net, although I may change that. It's more of a pain then anything else. It just slows the process down, and it's not necessary there in my opinion. In that case, I actually try to get the fish out of the water before they have a chance to gill themselves.

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    Default questions

    Hey guys,

    Like I said in my original post, I am new to this. So this may be a silly question...does it matter what time of day you dipnet? Is morning say preferable to afternoon or evening? Or is it a matter of just getting on the water?

    Thanks.

  11. #11
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Default fairbanks....

    Here is a great page with links if you just read and scroll down. Dipnetting 101, printable sheet is pretty good. Good luck
    http://www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/regio...lUse/index.cfm.
    as to those other questions, some say two hours before and after high tide. Some say two hours both side of both high and low tides and some say just keep your butt in the water until you get your limit.
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    Default Drive time

    How long is the drive to Chitina? I think it looks like about 4-5 hours from F-banks.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smallmonzter View Post
    How long is the drive to Chitina? I think it looks like about 4-5 hours from F-banks.
    I'd say 5 hours or so pretty easy... It took me about 3.5 hours from Delta. The road from the Richardson to Chitna is a bit rough and twisty so you'll have to take it easy- especially with a trailer.

  14. #14
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Just get in the water.

    It is about 300 miles from Fairbanks to Chitna. If you make it in less than 5 hours you're not driving safely.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Default Roads

    Right on. I've driven the road between Banks -town and Valdez many times. Thanks! I've fished the Klutina many times over the past couple years so I am somewhat familiar with the area down that way. Where do I turn off of the highway to get to Chitina? Stupid question but...like I said, I'm new to this! I have to get this first trip planned out right to keep the wife and family coming back!!!

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