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Thread: Muzzle break on your hunting rifle?

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    Member arizonaguide's Avatar
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    Default Muzzle break on your hunting rifle?

    I know they're out there, but are they common?
    I have never shot a rifle with a muzzle break except the large .50BMG, but it sure DOES make a difference on that trigger pulling "event"!

    Is anyone using a hunting rifle with a muzzle break, and would it be a good thing for someone that was setting up their wife with a heavier caliber rifle (on another thread)? IF so, any recommendations on brand/installation?

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arizonaguide View Post
    I know they're out there, but are they common?
    I have never shot a rifle with a muzzle break except the large .50BMG, but it sure DOES make a difference on that trigger pulling "event"!

    Is anyone using a hunting rifle with a muzzle break, and would it be a good thing for someone that was setting up their wife with a heavier caliber rifle (on another thread)? IF so, any recommendations on brand/installation?
    A muzzle with a "break" will not shoot worth a darn. However a muzzle brake on a rifle may prove beneficial. Couldn't resist.

    They are common and are anathema IMO, but if you want one there are many from which to choose. I've no hankering for one, but perhaps http://www.muzzlebrakes.com/ is among the best known and would be the top candidate to get my money.

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    Have a KDF brake on my FN .300 mag and I love it..Maybe the .300 aint that much of a kicker but im not a big fellar either so its great. To loud ,,,o well, im sold on it.

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    Member arizonaguide's Avatar
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    Cool! There's a guy on another thread that's thinking about a 30-06 for his wife, and maybe it might be a possible benefit. Heck, I may like one eventually too. So, I thought it might be good to lay out some possible options/recommendations.

    I know it sure makes a difference on the big boys!

    All suggestions from folks in the know are helpful.

  5. #5
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    i dont have brakes mine are ported... but i think Magna Port has a good system for both brakes and porting.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  6. #6

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    Not for me! I am a firm thinker that anyone is able to master recoil if they put in the time. I have shot enough rounds through big bores to not be recoil shy. Tweren't always the case though. I can remember my first deer rifle a 700 ADL(just like yours) only in 270. I was twenty years old then and the old guys at the range laughed at me. I have no idea how many rounds ago that was but slowly and surely over the years I have adapted to recoil. I have zeroed in bunches of light weight slug guns for folk over the years and that is a contributing factor. A couple of years ago I zeroed in my brothers 416 Rigby with 400 grain slugs and put five shots into an inch. It busted me each and every shot and I knew it was going to but I dealt with it. No brain no pain is what I've been told but it's more like shut the brain off in regards to the pain.

    I have mentioned this before but will again..... I remember watching Bodington's 110lb daughter hunt Africa with a 416 Remington and she had no muzzle brake on that particular gun.

    Like I said "not for me". However it's not a macho thing! If they make you shoot your gun with more accuracy and give you more confidence then go for it. My body isn't getting any younger and there could come a day when my pain tolerance goes kapoot and I quit saying "not for me". I won't hesitate to have someone screw one of them on the end of my gun if it makes a difference!

  7. #7
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    I've installed probably over 200 KDF brakes on everything from 223, don't ask me why, up to 50 BMG. In my experience, the more powder you burn, the more effective they are. I installed one on my wife's M-700 in 30-06 and she can run through 60 to 80 rounds in an afternoon with no ill effects. I'm sure she would stop after about 15 or so without it. They are very effective on the Ultra mags, Weatherby 378 family of ctgs. and most of the common "magnums". Some folks like them so their kids/wife can shoot a bigger cal rifle without getting beat up. Usually a brake and a good recoil pad and they can run you out of ammo. In the field they are probably not as "necessary" as you are only shooting one or two rounds , and we usually don't notice the rifle going off. But for range work with bigger guns, they work well to mitigate recoil. The primary complaint is "noise" as they direct a substantial portion of the muzzle blast to the side, so folks should be kept from standing beside the gun when it is discharged. That and we should be courteous to other shooters in our immediate area when shooting and let them know when we are using a braked firearm.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I've messed with a few muzzle brakes on friend's rifles but I've yet to own one. I've noticed that more people seem to object to muzzle blast than recoil. I've seen a number of people develop a serious flinch on mild recoiling rifles when they weren't wearing proper hearing protection which leads me to believe that muzzle blast was the primary factor rather than recoil. I personally think the "recoil sensitive" ought to stick to lighter rounds with straight barrels and wear good hearing protection.

    That said, brakes do work but not enough for me to really get interested in one. No one in the family is recoil sensitive enough to bother with it at the expense of the racket they generate.

    I did play with an interesting number in .240 Weatherby with an Accubrake installed. Loud as dangit, but you could watch bullet strikes at 300yds and recoil was about like a .222 in a chunky rifle.

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    Member Stanly's Avatar
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    Default I have one

    on my 338-378. I also had a custom thumbhole stock made with Sims pad and mercury reducer. With that said, shooting it with the brake on to me seems about like a 30-06, with out it about like a 338 WM. Very noticeable difference. As to the noise, I shot at Birchwood with muffs on. I didn't notice any difference in noise. The brake was made by the guy who made the stock. It's a slim line and matches the barrel contour.
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    I am of the same opinion as EKC and Hodgeman. I find the bark worse than the bite. So I use double hearing protection at the range and find that to be the single biggest factor in preventing flinching. My .300 WBY came from the factory with the screw-on Accubrake, but I took it off and put the thread protector on instead. Sure it kicks harder, but not that bad. And it took 2" off the barrel length to boot.

  11. #11
    Pilot1995
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    Default Won't ever own a gun with one!

    Magnaported & braked guns are loud! You and anyone close to your gun will need ear protection when you shoot it. If you don't like shooting your gun at the range spend your money on a caldwell lead sled to sight it in. You won't notice how hard a big gun kicks in the feild. Then practice your shooting with a gun you like to shoot. Bottom line for me, muzzle brakes and magnaporting takes value away from a gun. One ear ringing experience was enough for me to understand why my Dad taught me to learn how to handle my gun an not have it muzzlebraked or magnaported.

  12. #12
    Member arizonaguide's Avatar
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    Yep, it was a MUST on the only gun that I've shot it on (the .50) and it was a loud/awe inspiring event.
    The backblast from the break alone can easily put a hole through 3/4" plywood.
    You DON'T want to be standing close to the muzzle near it.

    The way that I've always handled BIG recoil was the old way Dad taught me: "pull that sucker tight into your shoulder, son!"...and I've shot his .300weatherby without issue since I was 12yrs old with that technique.

    I always practice with muffs/eyes anyway...and in the field I'd never notice the noise anyway.
    So, it may become a possibility as I get older and the bones start to ache (more than they already do).

    I guess the typical change with the break they say for a .30-06 is it recoils about equal to a .243. That's pretty substantial. (40% decrease, they say).
    Especially for a small wife/person.

    So, I guess the rule would be to practice with good muffs (I use noise cancelling) if you do go with the break. I do that anyway.

  13. #13
    Pilot1995
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    I shot my cousins 270 winchester that had a muzzle brake on it at a deer one year. I didn't put ear plugs in for the two shots I made. I wouldn't have wanted to shoot it again unless I had ear plugs. Left me wondering why he wanted a brake on a 270 winchester? Didn't ask so I'll never understand. My 270 is nice to shoot, and when I shoot it in the field it doesn't leave me deaf!

    Lucky for me none of my hunting partners have magna ports or muzzlebrakes. I was always told to be careful when I was around people with magnaported or muzzlebraked guns. After shooting one without ear plugs I realized why I was told I could get serious ear damage from standing beside a gun that was ported when it went off.

    I honestly should be putting ear plugs in if I have time before I shoot at something in the field. I do it when I'm shoot at targets. If you have a ported gun you had better make it a habit rather than just a thought! Also tell other's around you to plug them ears too or stand back.

    As you can tell, I'm on the far side of the spectrum on this - the reduction in recoil benifit is far outweight by the increased noise.

  14. #14
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Brakes sure can reduce felt recoil but like many others I dislike the blast worse and the potential hearing damage.... I use hearing protection even when I hunt ( put in plugs when game is spotted unless enuff time not available ) and would not want to shoot my braked gun even once without plugs....
    Two things seem to help reduce felt recoil.
    1. gun tight to shoulder for sure
    2. intense focus on target - you should learn to have the gun ( suprise you ) a bit when it does go off - that will tell you you are really focussing on the target - game or paper....

    Also, set a reasonable limit to how many rounds you shoot at a time - maybe 10 - 20 a session is plenty untill you build tolerances....

  15. #15

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    Look into the newer Savage 116 with accu triger, accu stock, and a turn on turn off muzzle break. You can turn it on when your at the range or when you have time to set up in the field and put on ear muffs. Or you can turn it off while carrying it around in the field in case of a jump shot. This break will take 30 to 40% of the recoil out, but you will need ear muffs.

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    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    Not for me! I am a firm thinker that anyone is able to master recoil if they put in the time. I have shot enough rounds through big bores to not be recoil shy. Tweren't always the case though. I can remember my first deer rifle a 700 ADL(just like yours) only in 270. I was twenty years old then and the old guys at the range laughed at me. I have no idea how many rounds ago that was but slowly and surely over the years I have adapted to recoil. I have zeroed in bunches of light weight slug guns for folk over the years and that is a contributing factor. A couple of years ago I zeroed in my brothers 416 Rigby with 400 grain slugs and put five shots into an inch. It busted me each and every shot and I knew it was going to but I dealt with it. No brain no pain is what I've been told but it's more like shut the brain off in regards to the pain.

    I have mentioned this before but will again..... I remember watching Bodington's 110lb daughter hunt Africa with a 416 Remington and she had no muzzle brake on that particular gun.

    Like I said "not for me". However it's not a macho thing! If they make you shoot your gun with more accuracy and give you more confidence then go for it. My body isn't getting any younger and there could come a day when my pain tolerance goes kapoot and I quit saying "not for me". I won't hesitate to have someone screw one of them on the end of my gun if it makes a difference!
    Well said. It just takes more focus to shoot well with high-recoiling rifles. I do tend to reduce the recoil on my hard kickers (.340 and .375 Wby) by making them a little on the heavy side, about a pound or so heavier than my .300 Win Mag, so they don't feel that bad anyway. Also, I practice shooting hardier recoiling rifles with a shoulder recoil pad. Makes a difference. A brake on a rifle just makes it too loud and adds barrel length. I'm not saying others should not use them if they like them, but I don't like them.

  17. #17
    Member fnsakdel's Avatar
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    Default Muzzle break on your hunting rifle

    I have muzzle brakes on two of my hunting gun. They reduced recoil 35 to 40 percent eliminated muzzle flip completely and They are not any louder or felt. Guess it matters which muzzle brakes you use. Thanks Del

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    I'd avoid them if at all possible. The muzzle blast is quite literally deffening! If I'm setting up someone with recoil sensitivity I'd try to find a friendly calibre in a gun FIT FOR THAT PERSON! Diminishing felt recoil can be as good as diminishing the recoil itself.

    Brett

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    We have installed well over 400 brakes over the past few years (our own proprietary one) and cannot recall a single complaint about noise.

    From the shooter

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    I shoot a .300RUM with a brake. It's great for spotting shots and for long range work when you have all the time in the world to get ready and PUT IN EARPLUGS but when a quick shot presents itself prepare to be deafened. I am currently stepping it down to something without a brake for most of my hunting. If you're shooting at a range it's kind of nice because no one will sit anywhere near you.

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