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Thread: Respect for your Hunting Rights...(stories)

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    Member arizonaguide's Avatar
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    Default Respect for your Hunting Rights...(stories)

    I would like to start a thread about Hunting Stories, and if your Father or Grandfather taught you to hunt with respect, and never take an animals life just for "fun".

    Did anyone's family teach them that an animal should be taken for their meat, or as a show of respect for that animal?
    For example my buddy tells a great story about how when he first shot a small bird (on their farm) with his Daisy BB gun...his grandma made him clean/cook/eat it.

    I remember the stories about Buffalos shot just for their pelts, and Elephants shot just for their Ivory...and the rest left to rot on the plain.
    I don't want to believe that's Us.

    So, has anyone got any good stories about what their Father/Grandfather may have taught them about hunting/values?

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    My grandfather, the one that hunted, told me stories of shooting seals, wolves and bald eagles for their bounty when he was a kid in Alaska before WWII.

    While I'd love to have some story of being taught at a young age to not shoot what I wouldn't eat, it simply didn't happen for me. I teach my kids that they shouldn't take killing lightly and shouldn't do if for fun. Every kill should have a purpose, but I don't teach that every kill has to be directly for food. Our family believes that killing a mouse that's getting in your house is O.K. and the purpose is to protect your food. The same goes for bears and wolves. Killing them is protecting our food and there are times we need to do that. Unlike the simplistic "eat what you shoot" approach I teach my kids to understand sound scientific principles for game harvest limits, habitat preservation, habitat restoration, and predator control.

    One of my funny quirks that gets me in trouble with many of my friends is that I really don't like catch and release fishing. The same as I treat a mouse and a bear the same, I treat a fish the same way. Kill it if you need to eat, kill it if it's harming the balance (pike), but don't mess with it if it's not harming anything.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    your post.
    Great post, Doug! Well spoken. I agree about the catch/release also.

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    This is from a copy of a friends email to his nephew (first deer, during doe season):
    "I got the news that you bagged your first deer Saturday. That is awesome! By the way... a doe is just as tasty as a buck. You'll get that buck next time. In the mean time, enjoy the experience... and out of respect for the life you have rightfully taken, give thanks to God and to the spirit of that deer who was created to sustain man. Hunting and the killing of game is just when you respect the laws of nature. Good job, you are on you way to learning a skill that will ensure that you and your family never go hungry... that is a huge step toward being a real man. I am proud of you."


    I thought it was worth posting.

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    Default I like the aproach going on here.

    Dad started to teach me how to hunt when I was young, but we didn't go often enough to make it a lifestyle.
    I lived on his stories of hunting Alaska while he was in the service "cold bay 1942" just recently found his hunting/fishing license from that time, what a find.
    I had grown up with killing chickens and rabbits for dinner, animals we raised iin our own yard, so the thought of killing any thing for fun never occured to me, as matter of fact it was a shame to have to have to kill a wild cat to protect our livestock, but it had to be done.
    I love to hunt , but I'm not very good at it , I more enjoy just being in the woods. Seems like the most hunting I've done in the last few years is in search and rescue, but i know that doesn't really count . Now that I am close to retirement things are looking up. who knows.

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    Yup, Grampa taught me to duck and goose hunt in Montana. We'd hunt out of the pit at the warm water spring at 10-20 below with deeks and a chessie or two and 5 gal metal bucker full of charcoal briquets. Coffee with sugar, spam sandwiches in tinfoil over the coals and Oreos cookies. I remember getting a honker in the morning as a kid and grampa making us stay out all day long to wait to see if the mate would return because geese mate for life and that way you'd try and take the pair. We did this on more than one occasion. Thanks Grampa, rest in peace....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arleigh View Post
    Seems like the most hunting I've done in the last few years is in search and rescue, but i know that doesn't really count.
    That counts with ME, Bro! Great posts folks!

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    My dad took me hunting once, and fishing once. He never really liked either one, but I think he took me because he felt that every father should take their son hunting and fishing at least once. It may seem trivial, but both of those excursions were experiences I'll never forget.

    The hunting trip was for Pheasant in Western Oregon. I think I was around 6 or 7 years old, and my dad worked a half-day to make time for the trip. (Something he NEVER did.) He was using a borrowed shotgun and he let me carry his old .177 caliber pellet gun. We drove what seemed like forever down a series of dirt roads, and finally parked in a pull-out. At that point in my life, nothing had ever been more exciting to me than to be walking through the woods with my dad, carrying a gun and looking for animals. My dad shot one pheasant, and we took it home. My mom cooked it that night and everyone in the family got to sample some of it.

    I don't really recall him specifically teaching me not to kill for fun, but by his example I learned it anyway. I was raised by a man who doesn't hunt, yet took the time to take me hunting anyway.

    I had the great pride and honor of watching my son take his first game in August last year - a couple of Ptarmigan. I showed him how to dress them, and we had them for dinner in camp the same night. Someday, he will be teaching his children the same way.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKsoldier View Post
    At that point in my life, nothing had ever been more exciting to me than to be walking through the woods with my dad, carrying a gun and looking for animals. My dad shot one pheasant, and we took it home. My mom cooked it that night and everyone in the family got to sample some of it.

    I don't really recall him specifically teaching me not to kill for fun, but by his example I learned it anyway. I was raised by a man who doesn't hunt, yet took the time to take me hunting anyway.
    Quoted again...for truth. VERY cool, and exactly what I'm talking about.
    Thanks AKS. It gives me (some) hope for our own kids/futures.

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