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Thread: What is the best, toughest, small, transportable chainsain to handle mid level work?

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    Question What is the best, toughest, small, transportable chainsain to handle mid level work?

    Need a little chainsaw to travel by ATV/Canoe/etc. with case, and handle small stuff. Dependability is #1 followed by packability, followed by performance, though it needs to shine in all 3 areas.

    Which brand & model would work best?

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    Default stihl

    190 with case--perfect atv saw, and it's a STIHL

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    Don't know the exact answer but I have 2 different Stihl models and couldn't ask for anything better and I use them pretty hard.

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    What ever model you buy make sure the wife can handle it.

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    I have a Stihl MS 170. It is a sweet little saw.

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    Default You bet

    Yepper, that's why I said "for mid-level work". Had it been a chainsaw for me for Fathers Day I would have said "for big burly Alaska-sized man-work", meaning to me a Husky brand.

    King, you know I treat my girl right; that's why I'm looking for a NICE chainsaw for her.

    Did you ever see the Simpsons episode where Homer bought Marge a nice new bowling ball engraved: H O M E R ? Perhaps I had better see that episode again before following through with my plan? Or would it be sufficient to merely get her such a little girly saw that it wouldn't cut through a big burly man's neck?

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    i really like my stihl 026 (more recently called 260).

    enough power to handle a 20" bar/chain if you need the length and light enough to let the chips fly all day long.

    I would not go any lighter. Packed/shouldered this saw all over trails in the chugach with no trouble and no regrets.

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    Default canoeing chainsaw, etc.

    I bought a Husqvarna 335 XPT with a 14" bar for logjams and other backcountry work. It's a professional arborist's saw with a top handle for those awkward, in the tree moments, where it's useful to be able to use with one hand, if necessary. Powerful enough, tough and light. I still need to obtain a case for it. It currently rides in my "camp gear" action packer in my rig/canoe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post

    King, you know I treat my girl right; that's why I'm looking for a NICE chainsaw for her.

    Did you ever see the Simpsons episode where Homer bought Marge a nice new bowling ball engraved: H O M E R ? Perhaps I had better see that episode again before following through with my plan? Or would it be sufficient to merely get her such a little girly saw that it wouldn't cut through a big burly man's neck?
    If the saw wouldn't work she'd use one of your kitchen knives.

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    Rick's on the right track. If you want power in a small package, and don't mind the price, a professional arborist saw is the way to go. The difference in a pro small saw and a homeowner grade saw is substantial when the saws get small. The Husky 338XP/339 rear handle (replaced Rick's 335) or the Stihl MS 200 are perfect ATV/Boat saws if a max 16" bar will get the job done for you. Too bad they are usually $450+ at most dealers.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    If the saw wouldn't work she'd use one of your kitchen knives.
    King, next time you're over here for dinner I'm going order out instead of cooking. Its obvious now that I need to monitor what you're tellin' her.

    Thanks to you other responders out there. I think she's going to be really happy with a little Stihl or Husky. I know that I wanted to stay away from the Sam's club "Poulon" brand.... I think they have that name for a (the obvious) reason...

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    Stihl, no doubt about it. I have a 023 (now called the 230), it's a little big but still small enough. The 170 Dirt suggested would be perfect.

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    I just bought a fleet a Husky 347XP's that have been holding up great so far this summer. They are being packed through the brush and so light + high horsepower was the main consideration. They are perfect for brushing but have the guts to take down the occasional cottonwood. The summer is still young, but the guys using them aren't known for being easy on equipment and they give them 5 stars so far.

    I also have a Stihl 192TC arborist saw for packing on the snowmachine and fourwheeler. It works when I get bound up in the black spruce, but is gutless compared to the the 45-50cc class saws. It is also really hard to find good chains for it. The slightly larger Stihl 200 would probably be much better choice but is also quite a bit more expensive.

    Yk

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    The 290 is as small as I would go. There are great rack attachments for them that fit onto your ATV rack (unless you run a Polaris). I put a few hundred miles on a Can-Am 2-up with a saw mounted on the front (through big elevation changes and through thick brush, no trail).
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    Default Rack attachment for chainsaw to ATV

    Quote Originally Posted by Phish Finder View Post
    There are great rack attachments for them that fit onto your ATV rack (unless you run a Polaris).
    That sounds cool; I like that. Only problem is that the wife's ATV is a Polaris.... darnit, might have to mount it on my Grizzly instead; maybe that'll be equally handy for her use.

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    If looking at Stihls and want an easier to start one for the ladies - get the Easy2Start feature. It makes it really easy to start. The models will have C-BE or CE in the name. But your dealer will help you make the right choice if you give them all the requirement. I like the 250 C-BE that I got for my lady. She likes it too.

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    Default Buy just one

    Stihl works flawless for me.

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