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Thread: Rebarreling for a moose float hunt.

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    Default Rebarreling for a moose float hunt.

    I also posted this on the Campfire. I am in the beginning stages of planning a moose float hunt next year. Doe to a need for new gear I am forced to economize some. I would like your advise on what I should do. Take my current M70 Feitherweight classig (wood and blue) in .270, or have it rebarreled to .30/06, .338/06, or 35 Whelan? Spoe is Leupie 2.5-8. My local smith with do this inexpensively. What loads would you recommend?

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    Default .270

    How about you just use the .270 you have now? Sure it's not an ideal caliber for Moose, but it'll work just fine. Use a good quality bullet like a Swift A-Frame, Barnes Triple shock, Nosler partition or accubond, that is heavy for the caliber and you should be fine. Swift makes the A-frame in a 150 grainer that would work great...provided it shot well out of your rifle...and you handload. I don't know what's available for the 270 in factory loads. A friend of mine has used a 270 on moose for years without any problems.
    If you did want to rebarrel anyway, the 338/06 would be a nice round...as would the 30-06.

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    Quote Originally Posted by okbowman View Post
    I also posted this on the Campfire. I am in the beginning stages of planning a moose float hunt next year. Doe to a need for new gear I am forced to economize some. I would like your advise on what I should do. Take my current M70 Feitherweight classig (wood and blue) in .270, or have it rebarreled to .30/06, .338/06, or 35 Whelan? Spoe is Leupie 2.5-8. My local smith with do this inexpensively. What loads would you recommend?
    Quote Originally Posted by akfishinguy View Post
    How about you just use the .270 you have now? Sure it's not an ideal caliber for Moose, but it'll work just fine. Use a good quality bullet like a Swift A-Frame, Barnes Triple shock, Nosler partition or accubond, that is heavy for the caliber and you should be fine. Swift makes the A-frame in a 150 grainer that would work great...provided it shot well out of your rifle...and you handload. I don't know what's available for the 270 in factory loads. A friend of mine has used a 270 on moose for years without any problems.
    If you did want to rebarrel anyway, the 338/06 would be a nice round...as would the 30-06.
    I would love to use my trusty .270, but have read so many times that it is very marginal and .30 alibers are the real minumum. I understand that I need to use heavy for caliber bullets if I used my .270, but what bullet would you use...140 or 150 grain Triple Shocks, Partitions, or A-Frames? Or would you use the 160 grain Partition?

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    Default rebarrel

    On our float hunt how many other hunters are going and what caliber of weapons are they taking? If some one in the group has a larger caliber along, I would find a heavy bullet for your 270 that shoots well and use it. I realized that this does nothing for you to get another rifle but you can use the money on other equipment that you may need.
    Good hunting

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    Default

    I agree that you could get by with a heavy bullet in the .270. Don't have the experience to suggest a certain one though.
    Personally I would prefer to rebarrel to .35 Whelen (love that caliber. Great all around) or maybe the 35 Whelen Ackley Improved if your smith has that reamer. In reality the standard 35 Whelen will be all you need though.
    The .270 will probably work if the conditions are just right (and you'll never be hunting anything bigger than white tail again & don't need a bigger caliber), but if this is a "once in a lifetime" hunt I'd rather have the 35 Whelen & be able to take shots I might have to pass with the 270. Shoots at moose are rare enough that I really wouldn't want to be hampered by caliber in your place.
    And if you ever want to chase elk or something it will be great for that (and a great white tail cartridge to boot!).
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  6. #6

    Thumbs up Bullets

    As long as you are capable of good accuracy with your 270 it will work on Mr. Moose. Just use a heavy, hi quality bullet. Hawk Bullets makes 150, 165, and 180 grn. big game bullets for your rifle. Use the extra change to buy a good pair or binoculars or hip waders. GOOD LUCK !!!

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    Your 270 will do fine on moose PROVIDED you wait for the classic broadside shot. The advantage of using a larger caliber with a heavier bullet is that you can increase your odds of getting a shot because you have more opportunities to shoot in situations where the 270 would be risky.
    Tennessee

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    Default

    The guy I know with the best record for moose- 11 in the last 11 years with a total of 11 shots- swears by his 7x57 with 160 grain Nosler handloads at 2600 fps. As he puts it, "I'd rather eat the meat than stick holes in it, so of course I wait for broadside shots."

    Your 270 will do fine. In fact the only moose I've shot that actually crumpled at the shot was popped through the lungs at about 100 yards with a 150 grain Nosler. The only moose I ever had to shoot twice I popped through the lungs broadside with a 300 grain bullet in a 375 H&H, then got impatient as he started walking toward a bog. He'd have died from the shot, but I couldn't be sure his feet would still be dry when he did it. It may take some moose a little while to realize they are dead, but they are easy to kill with broadside shots.

    Put the money you'd spend on a new barrel into practice ammo for your 270, shoot nothing but offhand between now and your hunt, then climb into the raft with the confidence that you can probably shoot better than anyone else on board. And that's what it's all about. Putting a good bullet in the right place.

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    I have taken every critter up here except Buffalo with a 7x57mm.

    The biggest moose I ever saw taken was with a 30-30 M-94 Winchester.

    When I lived in the villages, the standard roifle of the old-timers who had been guiding and hunting for 60 years was the 30-06.

    Before that, most of them carried 30-40 chambered M-1895 Winchesters.

    When I was a kid, the folks down the road killed EVERYTHING with a 300 Savage M-1899.


    If you are good with the 270, it will work just fine on a float trip.
    It not like your'e going to go thrashing around the tall grass covered in fish guts.

    A 150 grain Nosler partion can be pushed up to 2,900 fps with IMR 4350 or IMR 4831.

    A 160 grain Nosler partition can be pushed to around 2750 to 2800 using the same powders.

    Those are chronoed from a 26 inch barrel, so figure 100 fps less from a 22 inch barrel.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Bearcat View Post
    On our float hunt how many other hunters are going and what caliber of weapons are they taking? If some one in the group has a larger caliber along, I would find a heavy bullet for your 270 that shoots well and use it. I realized that this does nothing for you to get another rifle but you can use the money on other equipment that you may need.
    Good hunting
    Two other guys are going...one with a .30/06 and the other a .270.

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    Default

    I'd use your 270 Win. loaded with 130 grain Barnes TSX bullets.

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    I prefer 140gr Trophy Bonded. I've used my 270 with that bullet for moose and elk. Federal sells off-the-shelf HE ammo with 140 Trophy Bonded Bearclaws. 2463#/ft of energy at 100 yards.

    Look at Federal's site. Check the various white boxes of bullets you're curious about and hit enter. You get a nice comparison chart.


    http://www.federalpremium.com/ballis...firearm=1&s1=1

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    270 with 150 grain Nosler Partition. Of the 19 Moose I have had the honor of taking 3 were one shot kills(fell over pronto)not stand there and stare at you in typical Moose fashion. One of those was with the 270 and 150 grain Nosler Partition.

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    Default 270

    Personally I love the Barnes TSX...the 165gr shoots fantastic out of my 300wsm. For the 270 I'd load the 150gr TSX. If they shot good, I'd use them. If not, you may have to try a different bullet. The A-Frame is a bit tougher than the partition since the nose section is also bonded, but a 160gr Partition should do fine too.

    I forgot to mention earlier, but it's just little trivia...the world record moose shot by John Crouse was taken with a 270.
    Last edited by akfishinguy; 01-24-2007 at 16:07.

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    Use your .270. You already know it and can shoot it. Lotsa meese fall over up here every year to .270s and .30-06s. As others have stated I'd go with a premium bullet or find a premium commercial load with with a super bullet in the 150 gr range to hedge your bets a little.

    Here's a little secret for ya. Rifle calibers only get bigger the closer you get to Anchorage. Most bushkins use .30-06 or smaller.
    Now what ?

  16. #16

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by stevelyn View Post
    Here's a little secret for ya. Rifle calibers only get bigger the closer you get to Anchorage. Most bushkins use .30-06 or smaller.

    Now aint that a mouthful!

  17. #17

    Default my .270 moose:)

    here is a pic from this year. 150 g. barnes x. went 20 yards. good broadside shot. recovered the bullet from the far side hide.

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    Use the .270 with heavy bullets. You said that you are going on a float hunt, so more than likely shots will be taken close enough to use the heaviest bullet for the .270. Use the heaviest Triple-Shock available. Lots of hunters use the .270 to hunt elk, and moose are not any harder to kill.

    Now, the .270 makes a perfect .338WM companion. maybe someday you can add a .338WM, and all the bases will be covered.

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    If you are comfortable with the .270 then load it up with some Swifts or Trophy 140's-they knock bjezus out them. I owned 5 .270's at one time and seen more 1 shot kills from the .270 than anyother caliber I own outside the 45-70. If you want something abit heavier and want to use the same action as you previously mentioned is rebarrel to the .338-06 and go with 210 Partitions or better yet load up with 250's for bear or moose "close in".

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    Like so may other, I agree with keeping your 270. You do your part of placing it in the breadbasket, use a quality bullet (several good ones already mentioned, pick one) and your 270 will do fine.
    There was an old timer I knew (from Oklahoma) that used a 243 for everything, including annual elk hunts in Colorado. I understand he took over 15 elk through the years. He was a very good shot. It still boils down to where you put it, not what you throw at it. Definately use a Premium bullet on large animals such as moose.
    Practice, practice, practice, then enjoy your hunt. You will do fine.

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