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Thread: Handheld VHF for near shore use?

  1. #1

    Default Handheld VHF for near shore use?

    My wife and I don't own a boat other than just a canoe, but we do like to get out around the coast. We're going to be doing more water-taxi drop-offs, PUCs, maybe some small boat rentals, and associated fun. I've heard some mention that they carry VHF for emergency use whenver near the shore.

    Would this be helpful? It seems like it could give communication for both emergency or possibly just information between us and a friend/water taxi in a boat and also weather alerts. Since I'm really not familiar with these, are there "gotchas" I'm missing? Is a license needed? Will I rarely be within range of anything useful? (I'm thinking around relatively common rec. shore areas out of Seward, Homer, Whittier, etc)

    It'd be great if we also had Air VHF, at least I like the idea of it. Would this add value (I'm thinking it might make it worth bringing in interior type areas).

    Thanks very much for any information anyone has!

    Travis

  2. #2
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default What part

    What part of the state would help? Depending on the terrain a handheld might be good for 5 miles or 30. The Eskimo villages along Norton Sound only monitor the local village frequencies so you would have to know which village uses what channel. On PWS you might be good anywheres.

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  3. #3
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default Well worth it

    The super small VHF's (yet still powerful)that are out there these days are Well Worth Having around I think,
    Very True, it does depend on your area but I gather you are going to be around the PWSound or Homer, Which I imagine has good reception and a lot of traffic that could recieve your transmissions from any canoeing area you find yourself in.

    Nice to have access to weather broadcasts twice a day also. Don't think you need a FCC license to carry handheld but you could go online and check that or call the CG guys they would probably know.

    Too easy and inexpensive to not have along, all the Comm Fishing traffic are monitoring 24/7 either channel 6 or 16, maybe 10 or 72, turn on the scan function and you'll find someone talking if you need help.
    I'd say, Go For It, but get a good one,
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member akjeff's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    Too easy and inexpensive to not have along, all the Comm Fishing traffic are monitoring 24/7 either channel 6 or 16, maybe 10 or 72, turn on the scan function and you'll find someone talking if you need help.
    I'd say, Go For It, but get a good one,

    I agree 100%.

  5. #5

    Default

    I recommend one of the floating versions, especially since you might be in a canoe. Waterproof is great, the radio still works if you flip, except it's working 100ft below you.

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