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Thread: Reduced Loads for .375 H&H

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    Default Reduced Loads for .375 H&H

    I just bought a Ruger No. 1 in .375 H&H and would like to hand load some reduced loads. Any and all bullet weights either jacketed or lead and corresponding powder/weight would be appreciated.

  2. #2

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    Check the Speer manual for reduced loads using SR 4759. Those work really well, and with the 235 they'll turn your #1 into a ***** cat. I've used those same loads while subbing the Hornady 220 intended for the 375 Winchester to turn out a dandy deer load on the order of the 38-55. The Hornady manual has reduced loads for their bullet using not only 4759, but also 4227 and AA 5744 that are a fair bit faster, but I haven't tried them.

    I've never diverged from the loads in the Lyman cast bullet manual for my cast bullets, and no need. They're excellent. In my experience the #1 in 375 is only topped by the #1 in 458 as the ideal cast bullet gun. I'm not talking about pushing velocities, rather using #2 alloy or wheel weights, both with gas checks, in velocities ranging from 1300-1500 fps. We're talking ragged hole groups at 100 yards with the 375296. With that flat nose, they really put deer down too, even at those low velocities.

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    Thanks for your info BrownBear. As soon as I can locate my Speer manual I will work up some loads.

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    BrownBear is not kidding about being able to turn a #1 375 H&H into a ***** cat! I have been doing reduced loads with Trailboss with the 220gr flat tips and the 235gr spire tips and its like shooting a 22 that leaves huge holes in the target. Talk about making people take a second look when you are on the shooting range.

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    while it isnt really a "reduced" load, if you load up some of the Speer 200 gr flat nose bullets and push them towards the upper limmit they are low on recoil and a blast to shoot. Sort of a varnmint load for the 375H&H.... so long as you dont plan on keeping any part of the critter

    terminal performance from that little flat poit at 3000 ish fps is rather fantastic
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

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    Good thread.

    I've been wanting to work up a round ball load for grouse shooting. A .375"-380" ball over about 3 or 4 grs Red dot may be the ticket. Anyone try this in the 375?

    I've loaded similar loads in 30-30 and 348 with good results for grouse and small game. Very little noise or meat damage. I slew a mouse in the yard once with the round ball load in 30-30, the "little meat damage" comment doesnt apply in that case. Works wonders on rattlesnakes heads also.

  7. #7

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    I haven't done it in 375 because I don't have a mold the right size, but I've done it in lots of other rounds. The trick for lots of shooting is to beat leading, even at low vels due to the bare lead. I've settled on casting from wheel weights, then seating the balls so their top edge is flush with the case mouth. Then I fill the gap around the ball with bullet lube like you do with a cap-and-ball black powder revolver. Nothing fancy needed for the lube. I settled on Crisco, just as used in the C&B revolver to prevent leading. Kinda messy, but easy to clean up after a shooting session.

    LEE makes double cavity molds for .375 and .380 round balls that sell for $19, so you're not out much money for the experiment. Just follow the instructions for mold preparation and care, and the molds will last a long time. I'd be inclined to go with the .375 mold for ease of loading in a 375 case. You might have to bell the case mouths very slightly to seat them.

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    I have a 265 grain cast bullet mould that I'm working on loads for, and I haven't had much luck using powders that give me good results in other cartridges like the .30-06. Powders like IMR 4227 and IMR 4895 (at reduced loadings) have given me hangfires and wide swings in velocity ES. I haven't had time to revisit it, but my next plan is to play with bulky flake powders like Unique. Probably starting with something like 12-14 grains and work up to about 1500 fps. I may have to pick up some Trail Boss, since that sounds perfect for this.

    Mike

  9. #9

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    Unique has been my go-to powder with cast bullets forever, and it's dandy in the 375. I just tip the bore up to settle the powder near the primer rather than messing with fillers. Never a misfire or hangfire in close to 40 years. Back when I had lots of it laying around, Herco was virtually as good.

    I haven't tried Trail Boss, but I agree that it looks really interesting.

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    I use a bit of dacron fluff when using Unique for extra light loads. I don't always have the luxury if tipping it up. Bunnies, snakes and packrats are usually downwards, along with the occasional rampaging mouse. The loads are much more consistant when the fluff is used. Red Dot is supposed to be less tempermental regarding powder position and no fluff/filler. I'm starting to try some Red dot loads in various light loads and see how it does.

    I've been using the Lee Liquid Alox lube for the round balls. I put about half a box of .310"-.315" round balls in a butter tub, and drizzle some of the lube over them. I then roll them around to coat them all, then dump out on plastic, or just leave the tub open until dry. The slightly oversize balls seem to work fine, they seem to squeeze down alright when seating, and I think they may give better grip in the rifling. I usually use a Lyman 310 tool to load the light loads, and do a little belling with the "M" die, seat to the major diameter is just below flush, and lightly crimp to lock the balls in place and close the gap that can accumulate grit or dirt. I think I've been using unsized cases for the light loads.

    Will have to look into the Lee molds. I need a .380 ball for a Navy percussion pistol anyway.

    You can buy .375" round balls for black powder pistols to try them out before buying a mold. Not much in the way of .380" balls available.

  11. #11

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    Track of the Wolf sells .380 balls and sells the LEE double cavity .380 mold.

    You can also get both from The Gun Works in Oregon, IIRC, and Log Cabin almost certainly sells both.

    Edit- Forgot to mention that when I cast .375 balls with wheelweights, they drop at .377.

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