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Thread: Basic Information Needed

  1. #1
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    Question Basic Information Needed

    I realize I am asking for pretty basic information but here goes:
    My wife and I will be treking through Alaska starting in late July for approx 60 days. We will have a travel trailer and will be starting our trip via the Alaska Marine Highway with many stops (including some days on Prince of Wales via another ferry line). We are not skilled fishing people, I have done some coastal salmon fishing here in California. We were thinking of bringing a couple of poles and doing some fishing along the way as we go through what promises to be beautiful country. However the reality of doing this is getting a little complex, so a few questions:
    1) What would be required in the way of licenses. I have a lifetime license in Calif which I'm sure is useless in Alaska or Canada, I am 68 yrs old, my wife is 57. I read somewhere that a 14 day license is $80 each plus salmon stamps etc., making the cost pretty steep to occassionaly fish during a 60 day trip.
    2) Assuming the license was handled, would novices get enough enjoyable fishing through Alaska and the Yukon to make the non-resident level fees worthwhile?
    3) Does digging for clams also require the fishing license?
    4) Another option is to not do the leisurely fishing from our campsites along the way but try to schedule one or two charters and only pay for a few days of license fees etc. (with high probability catches). Is this our best option?
    Thks in advance for some general advice. I just posted this on the salt water forum also. thks, Ed

  2. #2
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    Default

    Yes, you will need a fishing license to dig for clams.

    You will still need a fishing license if you go out with a charter.

    If you do not fish for king salmon you will not need any stamps in Alaska.

    You can also purchase a year long license for $145, 14 day for $80, 7 day for $55, 3 day for $35, and a 1 day for $20.

    Yes, you will be able to find some good fishing during your travels to Alaska. This sounds like a trip of a lifetime and I would say that the expense of a fishing license is worth it without a doubt.

    Hope you enjoy the trip!

  3. #3
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    Default kind of depends on

    how much you personnaly know about fishing.
    Ideal scenario - you've fished your entire life & know how to cast & fish. Buy a season license and when you hit an area you want to fish, hire a guide for a day to "learn the lay of the land".
    Less than ideal - you know which end of the line to tie the hook to (but not sure what knot to use). Buy the daily license & only fish w/guides.

    Have you checked out the fishing regs, yet? They can be pretty daunting for a first timer. Lots of regs that apply to specific drainages or streams. As an example - "fly" fishing doesn't have anything to do with the type of rod you're using, just your terminal tackle.
    There is some great fishing to be had here, but getting started on the various species and varying techniques can be frustrating.
    Gary

  4. #4
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    N'ern S.E. AK
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    Default

    I've got a map with road spots in Juneau.

    Shoot me PM. I'm on vacation the next two weeks so I won't be checking in here much, but I can send it to you when I get back.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    how much you personnaly know about fishing.
    Ideal scenario - you've fished your entire life & know how to cast & fish. Buy a season license and when you hit an area you want to fish, hire a guide for a day to "learn the lay of the land".
    Less than ideal - you know which end of the line to tie the hook to (but not sure what knot to use). Buy the daily license & only fish w/guides.

    Have you checked out the fishing regs, yet? They can be pretty daunting for a first timer. Lots of regs that apply to specific drainages or streams. As an example - "fly" fishing doesn't have anything to do with the type of rod you're using, just your terminal tackle.
    There is some great fishing to be had here, but getting started on the various species and varying techniques can be frustrating.
    Gary
    Though I'd say even if you are a rank amateur I'd still buy the "season" license and just fish whenever you feel like it. If you just fish 7 times either by yourself or in combination with charters you'll pay almost the same ($20 per day) as you would for the $145 season license. There are plenty of places you can go and get free advice like the sporting goods shops that are in the area you will be in. They are usually quite helpful and especially if you help support them and purchase some equipment from them. The first time I fished in Alaska I didn't have much of a clue what to do, but I went to a tackle shop right next to the Kenai River, bought some Pixees from them, went down below the Soldotna visitors center and had a nice 12 lb. silver on the bank about half an hour later. If you were in the Homer area and wanted some personal help I'd be more than willing to get together with you and show you how to do things. I'm sure there are people in other areas that would do the same.

    And you aren't likely to need a king stamp. In most places in the southcentral area there aren't any kings in the rivers you can catch. In fact in some places king season closes July 13th and in others July 30th. So if you're here after those times it would be a waste to buy a king stamp. Saltwater has some king opportunities, but they are pretty limited around here.

    If you like to fish at all I would just go for broke and get the season license. You'll only find yourself wishing you had.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

  6. #6
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    Default thanks to all

    Wow, a wealth of info, thanks, I certainly got on the correct forum. Some comments/responses: (from both freshwater and saltwater info)
    -I am aware that the price of the license (esp now that I know there is an annual non-res as opposed to many $80 14 day fees) is a small part of the budget of this trip. The ferry fees alone are significant with my truck and trailer on board. However, the lic fee is only justified if we have the passion to fish as there are a lot of things to do and see in 60 days ---I realize you can't answer that question but your info is helping us answer it.
    -the suggestions on books and info will be taken, thks
    -thks also for the guide suggestions as we will try a few of those even if we don't go the annual lic route
    -my wife read about Alaska and the fishing and now she wants to try fishing on the trip---could double the lic fee situation
    -maybe the best thing to do is realize the annual lic fee is similar to the cost of a real good dinner with a fine wine ---and could result in some even finer dinners

    We live on a lake that is one of the premier bass tournament lakes in the west --the pros frequently fish off my property with their $80K bass boats. However our lake doesn't have fish that I like to eat (other than an occassional crappie with the grandkids). And I am not a catch and release fan, I like to eat what I catch. Thks again for the info, very useful.
    (although I am not sure what is meant by the cheap Ralph Lauren post? Ed

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