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Thread: Starting out in bush flying?

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    Default Starting out in bush flying?

    I'm pretty new to all of this but I'm at the age for a decision. I've been wanting to get into bush flying, but what/how should I start? If you had to give some advise to a budding young aviator wanting to get into bush flying, what would it be?

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    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    no comment,.. whoops

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

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    If you come from a VERY Wealthy family, go for it. If not, consider another pursuit.

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    Don't worry about becoming a bush pilot, rather worry about becoming a really, really good and safe pilot. Start with learning to fly. Find somebody to follow around to learn the ropes. Then buy an airplane and try not to wreck it! You got to learn to crawl before you can walk, then run, then win Mt. Marathon. It's going to take some time.

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    Hello Tippacanoe,

    Congrats on your desire to become a bush pilot. It is something that so few actually get to do and such an amazing opportunity to enjoy the last great wilderness places in North America.

    Do you have your private pilot license yet? That's the first step obviously.

    Where do you live? Canada is a big place... :-)

    You didn't state whether you wanted to be a recreational pilot or fly for a living. If you're doing it for recreation, no need to get a commercial license, spend the $$$ on hours in the plane. If you're in an area where there is bush operations going on, hang out with some of the guys. Hanging out on the airport ramp and talking to guys with big tires on their planes can open some doors. If anything you'll here some good stories (some may even be true) and you can tuck the lessons learned away for future reference.

    If your wallet can handle it, buying a small bird like a Champ, Cub, or T-Craft can really help you grow your skills and flight hours. There is no substitute for flight time.

    The internet is so full of information too. There is a bush flying book by F.E. Potts that has many free excerpts online, and can be bought as well.

    For some of us life is not about making it rich, but quality of life and satisfaction with your job is huge. I fly jets now and think every day about how to make it back to the Alaska bush.

    Good luck!!!

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    JRB is right! I'll only add that you will have to learn - - - HAVE TO LEARN - - - to slow fly an airplane. When you think you're slow flying, and can still make a turn without stalling the plane, you're not yet slow flying.

    AKAVIATOR is right about the small, affordable airplanes such as an old Champ, a Taylorcraft, or some other. Any of these "underpowered" airplanes will give you hours and hours of meaningful experience. While they may not be suitable for mountain ridges or sand beaches, you can find plenty of gravel bars out in the bush.

    Higher performance airplanes will ony allow you to use shorter strips and bars or lakes. Become a GOOD airplane driver, and then look to the bush planes and true bush flying. It's lonely, it's hard, and it doesn't pay much. But nothing else in the world approaches its satisfaction!

    Mort

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    I agree with all the advice given so far. If you are in the education phase of your life, try for an A&P ticket as well. It will open up more opportunities and if you go on your own someday will be very valuable to the operation of your own aircraft. Find an instructor that has really been there, not just a kid building hours.

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    Thanks for all the advice so far! I guess I should have given a bit more insight as to who I am. Right now I'm working on my private ticket, if all goes well, I should have it done by early July. Right now I have my mind set on flying for a living, so I'm trying to plan my next few steps forward. Being an avid outdoors person (at least in my books :-) and having a love of flying brought me around to the idea of a Northern Pilot. Thanks for also not tearing apart my question as a newcomer!

    Tipp


    "Experience is what you got by not having it when you need it."

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    Speaking of bush flying, I came across this video and thought I would share it. Not the most difficult by any means, but still entertaining to watch.

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    Thad video clip is awesome!

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    The video has been around for a while. Don't let it fool you into thinking that it is possible any day of the week. Turn up the volume and listen to the wind, it's blowing hard. Wind works on a wing the same as airspeed, more wind less ground speed , shorter roll. In a no wind situation he would have rolled 200 feet instead of 10.

    The Cub fly's just fine with airspeed just off the peg when configured properly. When modified with V/G's and wing tips it fly's even better. Add a 25kt head wind and you get a 5kt ground speed.

    Anyway, very cool flying and without a doubt a good pilot but very deceiving for average Joe when thinking about landing out in the field.

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    So did you get your private? If so, congrats. But you got a long way to go. Concentrate on the next step, a commercial or instrument rating. You have to build time now. Going to be a while before you can really earn much as a pilot. Get to where your employable and see where that takes you.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    Just remember to set limits for yourself and the equipment you are flying. If you go out and ball up an aircraft early on it may be real hard to get a job as employers will look at you a someone W/ poor judgement. If you find that you are scareing yourself everyday you are either over your head on ability or the A/C isn't up to what your doing. Good luck

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