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Thread: Bailing arm getting tired

  1. #1
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    Default Bailing arm getting tired

    I'm new to powered freighter canoes and looking for some advice. Sorry if this question's been covered elsewhere.

    I just got a 19' Grumman, circa 1980, and clamped a five year old 15hp Suzuki 4-stroke on the transom, in order to get to town on the upper Yukon. Well, I made it to town, but a fountain of water would gush over the transom whenever I got near full throttle. Up to half throttle or so it was okay. There was one lighter person in the bow, and what little weight we carried was up there too.

    I tried putting the trim at different angles by shifting the pin on the mount around, but it didn't make much difference, except letting the motor go lower (so the propeller pointed down more) seemed to cut back on the gushing slightly. So I plugged up the freshets (they shoot in where the motor meets the mount) with some junk foam, and bailed on up.

    Can I solve this with mounting adjustments, or do I just need to come up with the best skirt I can, and go slow if I want to be dry?

  2. #2
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    Default

    too much HP for that craft unless heavily loaded.

  3. #3
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    Default leveling out the freighter

    Yes, these are all your friends to help solve this:

    spray rails
    spray cover snapped on over top
    stingray (horizontal fin) mounted on motor
    milk crate full of rocks in front, if still not level
    tiller extension so your weight moves forward
    extend the gas line so all gas is in front

    And yes, a 9.9 would be better. I'm running a 15 HP in my Scott of same length as yours (and technically I'm running too much HP), but I bet my canoe is just about twice the weight and a bit wider, with a transom double the width of yours.

  4. #4
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    Default over flow

    this will happend with the rig you have, what you can do is build up the transom an seal well bring the sides near the transom up some also,
    raze the transom up about 4 / 5 /6 inches with a 2 x 8 bolt it to the transom out side of canoe works best, then seal with good RTV that sticks to the canoe, after that you will still get some around the sides, the way to fix that is RTV a side board from the transom extension to the canoe, forward for about 8 / 10 inches will stop most of it, an use a sponge to get the rest,
    use a car wash, type as it will soak the water up with out pushing on it
    the side sheld can be wood but alum will work best it don't have to go to the top of the rizer just up about 2 to 3 inches use pop riverts on the canoe side an screws on the rizer side an seal with RTV sealent or good cocking compond that will grip the canoe an not leak A 15 HP is not to much motor a little heavy thow enjoy

    my 2 cts sid

  5. #5
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    Default bailing....

    Most 9.9 hp and 15 hp motors from the same maker are the same motors in different level of tune ... they weigh the same. I believe you are referring to a 4 stroke; they are about 20# heavier than a 2 stroke 15 hp. My relatively recent 15 horse Yamaha weighed 78#, prior to installation of a RockHopper motor guard, and a StingRay planning fin. When shopping I considered a 15 Honda and Suzuki. IIRC, they weighed 101#, without adding accessories ... RockHopper, StingRay, Klingel lift. My points are ... some of us prefer 15 hp motors ... they are just as light as 9.9 hp motors, with exceptions ... 2 strokes offer weight savings over 4 strokes ... (I'm a Honda brand loyalist, but their 15 was too heavy, IMHO.)

    You didn't mention a lift. You should install one. They are the frame for you to install an effective skirt.

    Shifting weight forward will improve your trim, as well as using an articulated tiller extension so you can get out of the 19'er's skinny rear and move a bit forward.

    The StingRay works well, and actually lifts the rear of the boat as speed rises above approx 10 mph. I like it. I haven't clocked my top speed with the StingRay on, but my max GPS speed without was 16.5 mph. I'll clock it sometime soon ... perhaps the StingRay, reducing the wetted area, will up the speed a little, although I think that's fast enough for what I do.

    The 19' Grummans require you to adapt the boat to your needs. Sounds like you're on the learning curve .... keep at it.

  6. #6

    Default

    Back in the mid-late '70s I bought a 19' freighter. I added three more keels to each side of the main keel, made from either 1/2" or 5/8" extruded aluminum (T shaped). I power riveted them on just like the center keel. This made the canoe way more stable. I also added a "jackass" lift on the stern. With an extended throttle in one hand and an extended lift handle in the other, I stood up to drive it, my weight being forward a little more than if I was sitting. I used both handles to stabilize myself while underway. Visibility was way better also. If I came to a sweeper in the water, and it wasn't sticking up, I could go right over it, not tipping because of the multiple keels on the bottom. I used a 15 hp Evinrude.

  7. #7
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    Default on bottom of canoe

    Attachment 26301 this is channel but it works hope it comes out {it did work}
    but this is a lot more work what the man wanted, all he wanted was to stop the boil of water from coming it an with out spending a lot more money, the transom rise out of a 2 X 8 an a few bolts an RTV to seal out some of the water an a little rise on the each side of the transom will work for him with out to much expence, plus with the 5 inch rise will help him travel in less water then before, there is always a better way but but also more money to do so,

    good luck on what ever you do to fix your problem

    SID

  8. #8
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    Default skirt

    Thanks for the suggestions. It sounds good to raise the motor up a bit, but what I think I'll try first is to keep the motor mounted the way it is, but to make a skirt out of some heavy tarp, clamped under the motor and on the rear gunwales, but propped up in front of it a foot or two by some sort of frame, enough so that the water can mostly drain off the back or sides instead of coming into the boat. As much water as I can reduce is an improvement.

    Generally speaking, should the motor be set so that the prop's thrust is angled down as much as possible, or should it be somewhere between that and level?

    The Stingray's an interesting idea too which I'll look into. I probably won't go for a lift at this time mostly 'cause I'm always in deep water.

  9. #9
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    Default Angle

    try both ways an use the one you like, you can talk angle of the dangle but what ever works for you best, it all works, some a little better that others,
    but you will be tipping the motor up after you use a up a few props on the rocks / gravel ,

    by razeing the transom up it will save the props some with out the lift, an still get aroundin fairley thin water still need a tiller extension handle,

    I used a fixed extension it worked best for me, there is a flex extension as well [have tried both]
    PS there is a short an long extension I like the long one with the lift as I stand up in the thin water [ need to see what is up front of canoe an what is coming at me ]

    if you put the motor on the canoe an see how far the the motor hanges below the bottom you will have a fit,
    I know I did an went about fixing it,

    SID

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