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Thread: Would you anchor like this.....?

  1. #1

    Default Would you anchor like this.....?

    Saw this in Surprise Cove this weekend. Drop anchor, let out some line, figure that's about the right amount and tie it off. That's it. There was little to no wind and the forecast was for more of the same, but I've always dropped anchor, backed up (usually toward the closest shore), made sure the anchor caught and held, and then tied it off. Looked like a new boat, so maybe he's new at anchoring. Hope it doesn't come back to bite him some day when the wind kicks up. Stranger yet, I saw a guy on about a 32 foot boat do the same thing. I don't think this was his first time out.

  2. #2
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Never done that personally but depending on the bottom and how long I was anchoring up for I may consider it but mostly likely not.

  3. #3

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    Sure I would. I do it when fishing all the time as I really don't care if the anchor is set or not as it is only temporary. Sure don't want to draw bottom, but never have either. Now would I do that and then go to bed? I don't know I could sleep knowing that anchor isn't really set. But, I suppose in a quiet cove with no winds and no real tide action it probably does matter one bit as long as thing continue to be that way.

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    Member Maast's Avatar
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    If its calm thats the way I anchor when I stop for fishing and all I want to do is not drift - I could drop a bucket full of rocks and it'd be effective for what I want to do. I'm on deck to monitor any possible movement.

    When I want to actually stop for an extended time to sleep/nap/eat I'll drop the anchor and start backing the boat down-current or down-wind (depending) and set it at a min of a 3 to 1 scope. I'll also set the chartplotters anchor drag alarm.
    My chartplotter has a nifty feature that tells me which way the tidal current is going if it isnt obvious.

    On the other hand, I've only been anchoring the new big boat for a few weeks now so I'm no expert.
    2696 Sea Raider Pilothouse
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  5. #5

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    He was anchoring for the night that way. My thinking is that if you just drop your anchor and line in the same place your line could get caught on the anchor and you could essentially end up with little to no scope. Plus if you don't back up until the line tightens, how do you know how close to shore you will be if you swing that way. Maybe I'm overly cautious.

  6. #6

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    "Setting" the anchor doesn't mean just dropping it overboard plus a little extra line for scope.

    It means SETTING the flukes in the bottom, just like setting a hook with a fishing rod. Scope is all about adjusting the angle so it stays SET, but you have to SET it first. If there's no current, that means using horsepower and the little R on your shift lever to pull on the anchor till it bites bottom. Pulling towards shore gives you some impression of how close to shore you'll swing, but as you know, doesn't account for tide changes and submerged stuff that's will try to wreck your bottom or running gear.

    I'm a fanatic about good anchoring (PITA maybe?).

    Here's another good tip. It's best to have two people to SET the anchor- one on the controls and the other on the anchor line or winch. When you think the anchor is SET, put the boat back in R and let the boat pull on it a little. The person at the anchor line should put their hand on the line and feel for vibrations or bouncing. You can feel an anchor slipping on bottom to surprising depths. I've done it on everything from 86-foot boats down to 13 foot zodiaks.

  7. #7
    Member polardds's Avatar
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    Default Everyone is different

    I feel the weight of the chain is what should hold me in place where I anchor. The anchor is just a back up. I am trying to anchor in protected places. Obviously if the wind picks up unexpectedly I can move, but I try to be in spots where that will not be a problem.

    I like to anchor in glassy areas that will stay that way. If I know some weather is coming I will "set" the anchor.

    I have twice the length of the boat in chain.

  8. #8
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    There's an element of truth in everything I've seen in this thread. I most closely align myself with Brown Bear on the matter of application.

    However I will add something not previously mentioned! We absolutely hate that swinging thing and want to see the same piece of shore when we look out the window so, after following the Bears setting techniques we then drop the "stern" anchor straight off the back. Now, for the nit picker theres plenty here to chew on as all them books say this or that about stern anchors BUT once your confidence builds thru experience all them books become more of a guide than a Bible! A certian amount of swing still takes place which will set that stern anchor EVEN WITH little or no scope out. I allow no more line than necessary to acomodate the tidal swings.

    And, on occasion I have just dropped both straight down, thrown the dingy over the side and gone to shore. So far it's all been there when we returned! I think the important thing to remember is that all of this is subject to change, be aware of your surroundings and adjust if necessary.

    That ole boy in Surprise could have been Noah and anchoring boats for a long time!
    Mike

  9. #9

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    One concern I would have with also having an anchor off the stern is if you are in a crowded anchorage and only one boat is anchored that way. Then someone could swing into or near you. If everyone is anchored with just the bow anchor then everyone should all be swinging the same way. I haven't seen anyone anchor like that just yet and what I'm saying here is just based on what I've read or heard.

  10. #10
    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    We also toss off a stern anchor, mostly for privacy but also in unprotected bites so we donít get sideways to the swell. Once we figure out where to set the wife drops anchor, when itís on the bottom I back up, we let out more line then we need so I can toss out the stern anchor close to shore after the anchor sets, than I have her pull in about a 3rd of the line. This works ok most of the time except when backed into an un-sheltered shore where wind can come from; this will usually cause the stern anchor to drag and Iím the one who has to get up in the middle of the night and retrieve it. We always anchor up with plenty of swing room in case the stern anchor looses its hold.
    Jay
    07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser
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  11. #11

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    I like these "anchor" threads. It seems everyone has there own way. I'm not in PWS and I've only anchored and stayed overnight away from my slip a few times. Quite honestly, though I didn't move a bit, I didn't sleep for ****. I have a 22# Bruce anchor on the bow. For those of you that use a stern anchor, what type and how big, and how much chain do you use. I can save some of you the trouble by saying I know it depends on the boat, or I shouldn't anchor from the stern. I'm just trying to get an idea from those that do. I've read in the past where "spoiled one" has said he "sleeps like a baby". I don't know if I could ever get that comfortable, but I'd like to.

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    Actually, for a stern set up none of that "boat size thing matters".
    I'm holding a 25 ft C-dory with a 16lb Bruce on the Bow, 30 ft of 1/4 chain then my 1/2 inch braid. During the deployment of the bow anchor the wife drives and right at that golden moment when we get a grab up front, she goes to neutral and shut's er off. At the same time I drop the stern rig off the back. My stern anchor is a Bruce wannabe that I made off the original and it weighs 11 lbs. To that I have fastened 5 ft of 1/4 chain and 3/8 braid. I also have a 3 lb bruce and a dozen ft of chain on a piece of fish gear that would work fine as well.

    As previously mentioned, that stern hook WILL be set 75% of the time when I pull it next morning!
    If you are apprehensive about tossing all you stuff in the water and going to bed, think about this. We come in around 5 ish, anchor up and take gus to shore, set up the grill, take a little spit bath, eat, watch a movie etc. During that time 5 hours has gone by and you've seen the tide go thru almost a half cycle by now. As long as your not too tight on your lines, all that you'll notice is the wonderful scenery!

    Now my old tired arse can't handle that ground tackle in very deep water and we never set up in water over 50 ft, prefering 30 ft. Try it sometime, you'll do fine.
    Mike

  13. #13
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    I normally just drop my anchor off my bow throw out some extra line for some scope and get ready for bed or whatever activity I have planned. Oh and I sleep like a baby except when passengers can't sleep and are constantly moving about checking on things. I always pull off in a protected cove or bay for the night so that helps A LOT plus I am running a jet boat and am able to get into some more protected areas as well as shallower which helps in my mind. If I had a larger boat and was anchoring in a current storm etc I would drop anchor and set it. The stern anchor does sound interesting to me but not worth the extra weight to me at this time.
    http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o...0junk/reag.jpg

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    Before taking any of my advice for granted on here research the legal ramifications thoroughly I am not the Troopers nor am I the Judge that will be presiding over your case/hearing. Please read the hunting and sportfishing regulations and feel free to interpret their meaning on your own.

  14. #14
    Member bhollis's Avatar
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    If I'm overnighting, I always set the anchor. I also usually try to anchor several hours before I go to bed. That way, I can watch things for a few hours and be pretty certain that I'm not going to drag during the night.

    If you don't set the anchor, you really have no way of knowing how far the anchor might drag--and how close to the beach/rocks your boat may get--before the anchor sets. For that matter, if you haven't tried to set the anchor, you really have no way of being certain that it will set at all. There have been number of occasions where when I tried to set the anchor, it never set firmly, and just dragged. I'd hate to have that happen while I was asleep.

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    Default Stern anchor caution!

    Be very cautious when using a stern anchor; there have been lives lost when stern anchor (lines) have fouled props and/or turned a boat stern-to the prevailing seas/winds. Boats are typically designed to face waves bow first and anchoring from the bow is the preferred method. I have personally witnessed a 22' boat capsize when anchored both stern and bow; luckily there was no one aboard. Generally speaking, anchoring (properly) from the bow will allow the boat to swing as wind/current conditions change, keeping the bow into the wind and minimizing the potential for capsizing....especially with smaller boats (under 30' or so...) Bow first also helps minimize the strain on the anchor/rode and proper scope (7:1) with a healthy shot of chain keeps the anchor to stay set. Many areas in the Sound and around Seward can be difficult to get a good set and a good set is crucial to a good night's sleep! Boat Safe! Mike

  16. #16

    Default Sleep like a baby...

    I have lots of chain and a truck size anchor, it will hold my boat plus two others rafted to it during williwa conditions, this has been tested. I stopped backing down on it after weathering a few storms. The Homer test and Seward test prove it holds in 100ft plus depths.

    It is my opinion that your anchor should be big enough and chain long enough (and scope) that you don't worry when you sleep, if you do re-evaluate your gear.

  17. #17
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    It is my opinion that your anchor should be big enough and chain long enough (and scope) that you don't worry when you sleep, if you do re-evaluate your gear.
    Ditto what Myers says. I will add that I also carry a complete setup as a backup. It is a pain to store an extra 600' of rode, 40-50' of 3/8" chain, and another 33 pound anchor, but I would hate to cut a trip short due to donating my terminal tackle.

    I do sleep like a baby on the boat as Homertime stated, but it is because of where I anchor in addition to how I anchor. My wife has an extremely demanding and high stress job. She sleeps like the dead when we are on the water. This is priceless to me!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  18. #18
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
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    Default all makes sense EXCEPT 7:1 ???

    Quote Originally Posted by CG Boating Safety View Post
    Be very cautious when using a stern anchor; there have been lives lost when stern anchor (lines) have fouled props and/or turned a boat stern-to the prevailing seas/winds. Boats are typically designed to face waves bow first and anchoring from the bow is the preferred method. I have personally witnessed a 22' boat capsize when anchored both stern and bow; luckily there was no one aboard. Generally speaking, anchoring (properly) from the bow will allow the boat to swing as wind/current conditions change, keeping the bow into the wind and minimizing the potential for capsizing....especially with smaller boats (under 30' or so...) Bow first also helps minimize the strain on the anchor/rode and proper scope (7:1) with a healthy shot of chain keeps the anchor to stay set. Many areas in the Sound and around Seward can be difficult to get a good set and a good set is crucial to a good night's sleep! Boat Safe! Mike
    A 7:1 scope? so you have 280 feet of rode out in 40 feet of water, 700' in 100' depth? Maybe for a tanker, but a 26'-30' boat

  19. #19
    Member dbull66's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    Saw this in Surprise Cove this weekend. Drop anchor, let out some line, figure that's about the right amount and tie it off. That's it. There was little to no wind and the forecast was for more of the same, but I've always dropped anchor, backed up (usually toward the closest shore), made sure the anchor caught and held, and then tied it off. Looked like a new boat, so maybe he's new at anchoring. Hope it doesn't come back to bite him some day when the wind kicks up. Stranger yet, I saw a guy on about a 32 foot boat do the same thing. I don't think this was his first time out.
    Are you talking about a red Hewescraft? It is a new boat , but not my first.. I had plenty of chain for the conditions.
    I cleaned fish and shrimp for what seemed like a couple of hours before we went to sleep. All went well till I pulled out of the cove in the morning and suprized a zodiak that was out there pulling my pots . He dropped one and took off in a hurry, when I got to them i saw that 2 of them were within 10 feet of each other. One had lots of shrimp and the other was empty. I had one other that was empty in line with full ones. If I had just got up eirlier.............

  20. #20
    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alasgun View Post
    Actually, for a stern set up none of that "boat size thing matters".
    I'm holding a 25 ft C-dory with a 16lb Bruce on the Bow, 30 ft of 1/4 chain then my 1/2 inch braid. During the deployment of the bow anchor the wife drives and right at that golden moment when we get a grab up front, she goes to neutral and shut's er off. At the same time I drop the stern rig off the back. My stern anchor is a Bruce wannabe that I made off the original and it weighs 11 lbs. To that I have fastened 5 ft of 1/4 chain and 3/8 braid. I also have a 3 lb bruce and a dozen ft of chain on a piece of fish gear that would work fine as well.

    As previously mentioned, that stern hook WILL be set 75% of the time when I pull it next morning!
    If you are apprehensive about tossing all you stuff in the water and going to bed, think about this. We come in around 5 ish, anchor up and take gus to shore, set up the grill, take a little spit bath, eat, watch a movie etc. During that time 5 hours has gone by and you've seen the tide go thru almost a half cycle by now. As long as your not too tight on your lines, all that you'll notice is the wonderful scenery!

    Now my old tired arse can't handle that ground tackle in very deep water and we never set up in water over 50 ft, prefering 30 ft. Try it sometime, you'll do fine.
    Mike
    Now I know my setup is overkill because my 22 ft C-dory has the same setup. 16# bow with 30ft chain and 1/2' line, 12# bruce stern with 5 foot chain and 3/8' line. Stern is my also my backup and fish anchor
    Jay
    07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser
    OurPlayground.


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