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Thread: Grayling lake fishing

  1. #1
    Member Theone2's Avatar
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    Default Grayling lake fishing

    Going lake fishing for Grayling tonight.
    Got all the right tackle etc.

    Anyone have any good tips on where to find these Grayling and how to catch them in lakes????

    I do catch some big bows all the time but i want to try something new.
    thanks

  2. #2
    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theone2 View Post
    Going lake fishing for Grayling tonight.
    Got all the right tackle etc.

    Anyone have any good tips on where to find these Grayling and how to catch them in lakes????

    I do catch some big bows all the time but i want to try something new.
    thanks
    FWIW; I haven't done much lake fishing targeting grayling. However, in the little that I have done, I have found them along shelfs. Where there is a stretch of shallow water near the shore and a decent drop into cooler water. I have caught my biggest lake grayling by standing near the edge of the shelf and stripping a big bugger lengthwise right on the edge of the shelf where the deep/cold water meets the shallow/warmer water. Of course if you're lucky you'll find them popping the surface and elk hair caddis of all sizes never fails me.

    Keep in mind that 80% of all my lake fishing for grayling has been in one lake only. So.. maybe good advice, perhaps not. It's a starting point though. Outflows/inflows are always a good bet as well.

  3. #3

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    I'm sitting down here in central Idaho and the ice has just gone out from most of the lakes here so the water temps aren't going to be much different than AK..... IF I were going to fish these lakes that are basically trout only, I'd fall back to my old standbys..... terrestrial flies. Beetles and ants.

    There simply CAN'T be much bug activity going on in those lakes up there or down here... in fact there never really is much in my lakes here.... so my fish rely heavily on terrestrials blowing into the water...

    Fish a black ant or a beetle pattern that you can see... I like a touch of white or red yarn on top of my beetle patterns so I can see the dam things.

    Two bits says a black ant will catch fish.

    L

  4. #4

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    Just for pure fun, I like to use a oversized hair dry- on the order of a size 10 or so Deerhair Caddis or Elk Hair Caddis- with a nymph on a dropper about a foot below it. Just tie a piece of leader onto the bend of the dry (clinch knot is fine), then tie the nymph to the end.

    I fish this rig pretty actively, making the dry wake and wiggle around on the surface. It will drag a grayling up from surprisingly deep water, and if they hit it, they're going 100 miles an hour. Three times out of four though, the dry just disappears as they hit the nymph below. I'm making a strong guess that the large size and activity of the dry is more attention getter than anything, but in any case I double or triple my catch on the nymph, compared to fishing the nymph by itself. It just seems to help the fish find the nymph. They come looking at the dry whether they hit it or not, then take the nymph wiggling around right in front of them. It's the same kind of arrangement we use in Montana and Wyoming on summer trips to "hopper" fish.

    BTW- This rig works just as well in the shallows when the fish move up there on a sunny day, but I don't move the dry very much at all. Just enough to move the nymph once in awhile, kinda "bobber" fishing if you see what I mean.

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