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Thread: Shelf lives?????

  1. #1
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    Default Shelf lives?????

    Any input much appreciated.......

    How long is the shelf life of the following when stored appropriately? How do you store appropriately?

    Corn pellets? Unleaded gas in 55 gal barrel or otherwise? Diesel fuel in 55 gal barrel or otherwise?

    Any one else with shelf life questions please feel free to chime in. I know I have more questions concerning this topic but cannot think of right now.
    “There's a humorous side to every situation. The challenge is to find it.”
    George Carlin

  2. #2

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    I've stored gas in drums for as long a 3 years it lost a lot of it kick but was still usable. I didn't use any thing like Stabil but that might help. I've never stored Diesel but I would thing it would store about the same an gas.
    Chuck

  3. #3
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    Default I always figured......

    .........gas would last one or two years max. I always thought diesel was supposed to keep a lot longer than unleaded, but I may be wrong. I do wonder what you mean by "lost a lot of kick." Engine sputtering, backfiring???
    “There's a humorous side to every situation. The challenge is to find it.”
    George Carlin

  4. #4
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    Default

    Diesel will gel if it sits at cold temps as the wax precipitates out. you can add kerosene to thin it out as it gets old / cold. there is a ratio, i forget, add 1 gallon kerosene per 20 or something like that and let it mix well.


    I would not use fuel older than 1 year (at most two) unless it was all I had. Especially in an outboard or a chainsaw I like using new fuel (like 1-2 months old) a lot more than I like cleaning carbs.


    The difference in the quality of the crude refined to produce fuel has a big influence on shelf life, and you have no way of knowing this. The additives in our fuel and diesel now make the shelf-life considerably shorter. At least we don't have to deal with ethanol in AK, yet.

    bottom line is fuel goes bad quickly, but it will still burn, just with less energy per gallon, and increased maintenance costs/time on the equipment burning it.

  5. #5
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    I would recomend a stabilizer if you plan on keeping fuel for any amount of time over one month as it degrades quickly and can produce really bad consequences on motors. The shelf life of gasoline with a stabilizer is one year.
    Fish when you can, work when you have to.

  6. #6
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    I've used untreated gas that was up to 5 (maybe 6?) years old with no noticable bad effects. The oldest stuff I mixed about 1/2-1/2 with fresh gas. I've used up to 3 year old untreated gas, and not mixed with fresh in my Suburban with no noticable bad effects, and 2 or 3 year old untreated gas in my Stihl chainsaw. The problem comes from gas that evaporated in a carburator, not the old gas, in my experience. The crud that can (but not neccesarily does) accumulate in a carb or fuel injection system is more of an issue than the old gas itself. My fuel was stored in drums, some of it outside uncovered, in weather 100+ deg to 20 below temps.

    At this point, I just try to rotate it out within 2 years and call it good. Just in case. My hand pump has a filter, but otherwise no treatment has been used.

    On a couple occasions, I know I've fired up my Sthl saw with gas that had sat in it for at least a year, and filled it with gas that had sat mixed for that long or longer in the plastic can I mix in. Never had the slightest trouble with the saw, other than it took a few more pulls to fire it.

    YMMV, but that's my experience.

  7. #7
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    I've used my own gas from plastic drums that was 3 years old and never noticed anything different from fresh gas. I used that fuel in 2 strokes and 4 strokes without a hiccup. I got a barrel of diesel from a friend who had moved after it had been stored for 6 or 7 years. Same story. That same friend gave a barrel of 6-7 year old gas to another friend. Three of us burned it in the snow machines, on the bar the entire day. We all filled up empty tanks, no mixing with newer gas. No problems.

  8. #8

    Default old gasser still using it !

    still using gas from two years ago . getting better gas mileage ,not using as much.
    Last edited by RUSTY PUPPY; 06-14-2010 at 22:08. Reason: type error

  9. #9
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    Didn't that stuff get pumped up from underground after sitting for millions of years?

  10. #10
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    Default

    I agree that gasoline is 2 to 3 years maximum. I think the two big issues are the vapor pressure of the light ends, (how easily the stuff that goes boom evaporates) and the slow oxidation of the fuel. Gasoline slowly oxidizing is what creates the gummy residue.

    To prevent the light ends from evaporating, keep the fuel in an air tight container in a cool place. To prevent it from slowly oxidizing, fill the container full, (as little air in it as possible) and add a stabilizer like Stabil.

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