Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Happy Memorial Day to Everyone

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    In an easy chair in Cyberspace
    Posts
    2,316

    Default Happy Memorial Day to Everyone

    Memorial Day is upon us and the weather looks nice. If you travel, I hope you travel safe and maybe get some rounds downrange that give you such a good group that you feel free to come and post it.

    Memorial Day is so full of trite platitudes from the chattering classes and Im tired of listening to that. We do honour the dead, but we must also to honour the living.

    Right now our boys and girls are fighting for us. My goal this Memorial Day is to give something back so I am gonna find a soldier and buy him something, where a beer, a coke, or dinner.

    Maybe we should all do the same.

    Have fun on this holiday, especially from our vets (and current serving soldiers) we have here working for you. Lets thank them all.

    God bless our wonderful country and the folks who serve

    Wild West Guns

  2. #2
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    Memorial is for our dead warriors and Veterans day for the living.Both are days of respect and Honor and thinking about what we lost or are willing to lose to live free. Memorial day is for sure a day of sadness and retrospect never happy.Many honor the vets here and gone everyday but too many today are just going to be pissed the bank is closed monday

  3. #3

    Default

    everyone have a safe weekend and be carefull this week when out on the roads ..

  4. #4
    Member arizonaguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Arizona/Alaska
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    Thank you for the wishes WWG! You as well.

    Anyone know who's laying the wreath on the tomb of the unknown soldier at Arlington this year? I wish I could be there.

    Stay safe, everyone.

  5. #5
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    Not the prez as it may make him look to American

  6. #6
    Member jkb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,466

    Default

    Thanks WWG hope to pick up the tab for a military family myself.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

  7. #7
    Member arizonaguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Arizona/Alaska
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Not the prez as it may make him look to American
    Well put. I wish I could do the honor...but, I hope they decide on someone deserving. Someone who would appreciate what it signifys.
    More than just a "photo op".

    God bless and look after our young folks wherever they may be.

    We call your attention to this small table...

    It is set for one, symbolizing the fact that members of our armed forces are missing from our ranks.
    They are referred to as POW's and MIA's. We call them warriors.

    They are unable to be with their loved ones and families tonight, so we join together to pay our humble tribute to them, and bear witness to their continued absence.

    This table (set for one) is small, symbolizing the frailty of one prisoner, alone against his or her suppressors.
    The tablecloth is white, symbolic of the purity of their intentions to respond to their country's call to arms.

    The single red rose in the vase, signifies the blood they may have shed in sacrifice to ensure the freedom of our beloved United States of America. This rose also reminds us of the family and friends of our missing comrades who keep the faith, while awaiting their return.

    The yellow ribbon on the vase represents the yellow ribbons worn on the lapels of the thousands who demand with unyielding determination a proper accounting of our comrades who are not among us tonight.

    A slice of lemon on the plate reminds us of their bitter fate.
    The salt sprinkled on the plate reminds us of the countless fallen tears of families as they wait.

    The glass is inverted - they cannot toast with us this night.
    The chair is empty - they are not here.

    The candle is reminiscent of the light of hope (which lives in our hearts) to illuminate their way home, away from their captors, to the open arms of a grateful nation.

    Let us pray to the supreme commander that all of our warriors will soon be back within our ranks.
    Let us remember and never forget their sacrifices.

    May god forever watch over them and protect them and their families.

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default Understanding

    Memorial Day Update 01: Three years after the Civil War ended, on 5 MAY 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country. The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

    Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., 25 APR 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well. Today, cities in the North and the South claim to be Memorial Day’s birthplace. Both Macon and Columbus, Ga., claim the title, as well as Richmond, Va. The village of Boalsburg, Pa., claims it began there two years earlier. A stone in a Carbondale, Ill., cemetery carries the statement that the first Decoration Day ceremony took place there on 29 APR 1866. Carbondale was the wartime home of Gen. Logan. Approximately 25 places have been named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, many of them in the South where most of the war dead were buried.

    In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on 5 MAY1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were either informal, not community-wide or one-time events. By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on 30 MAY throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities. It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May, as were some other federal holidays. Many Southern states also have their own days for honoring the Confederate dead. Mississippi celebrates Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of April, Alabama on the fourth Monday of April, and Georgia on 26 APR. North and South Carolina observe it on May 10, Louisiana on June 3 and Tennessee calls that date Confederate Decoration Day. Texas celebrates Confederate Heroes Day January 19 and Virginia calls the last Monday in May Confederate Memorial Day.

    Gen. Logan’s order for his posts to decorate graves in 1868 “with the choicest flowers of springtime” urged: “We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. ... Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.” The crowd attending the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery was approximately the same size as those that attend today’s observance, about 5,000 people. Then, as now, small American flags were placed on each grave — a tradition followed at many national cemeteries today. In recent years, the custom has grown in many families to decorate the graves of all departed loved ones. The origins of special services to honor those who die in war can be found in antiquity. The Athenian leader Pericles offered a tribute to the fallen heroes of the Peloponnesian War over 24 centuries ago that could be applied today to the 1.1 million Americans who have died in the nation’s wars: “Not only are they commemorated by columns and inscriptions, but there dwells also an unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone but in the hearts of men.”

    To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in DEC 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance. The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.” [Source: www.military.com/memorial-day May 2010 ++]

  10. #10
    Member arizonaguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Arizona/Alaska
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    Great post, Will.

    "Let us, then, at the time appointed gather around their sacred remains and garland the passionless mounds above them with the choicest flowers of spring-time; let us raise above them the dear old flag they saved from dishonor; let us in this solemn presence renew our pledges to aid and assist those whom they have left among us a sacred charge upon a nation's gratitude, the soldier's and sailor's widow and orphan."

    Grand Army of the Republic-(my favorite part of) General Orders No.11, WASHINGTON, D.C., May 5, 1868

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wildalaska View Post
    Memorial Day is upon us and the weather looks nice. If you travel, I hope you travel safe and maybe get some rounds downrange that give you such a good group that you feel free to come and post it.

    Memorial Day is so full of trite platitudes from the chattering classes and Im tired of listening to that. We do honour the dead, but we must also to honour the living.

    Right now our boys and girls are fighting for us. My goal this Memorial Day is to give something back so I am gonna find a soldier and buy him something, where a beer, a coke, or dinner.

    Maybe we should all do the same.

    Have fun on this holiday, especially from our vets (and current serving soldiers) we have here working for you. Lets thank them all.

    God bless our wonderful country and the folks who serve

    Wild West Guns
    I own some rental property and one of my renters is a Korean war vet. You better believe the landlord[me] is going to give him a case of his favorite beverage today.

  12. #12
    Member Smokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    3,334

    Default Nice Posts Members..

    Kingfisherktn has a post under Global Discussions ALL should read for sure...

    This is our local Cometary - almost 400 flags representing fallen hero's that have donated their flags to our VFW - they go out before daylight to make sure and catch the rising sun!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13

    Default

    Thanks good thoughts.

    I expect to suit up in my service dress blues and go to Fort Rich for the ceremony to think about Seabee's like CS2 Clark, UT3 Bollinger E03 Knot, LCDR Wolfe and the others who did not make it home from Iraq..

    and Senior Chief Westfall, CN Briscoe, and the others who and were wounded...

    My father in law, WWII, Korea and Vietnam is buried at Fort Rich.

  14. #14
    Member arizonaguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Arizona/Alaska
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    And also thoughts of old Vet's that DID make it home...and have since passed, like most of my Dad's buddies, and folks like Lieutenant Commander Roy H. Boehm, RIP. Not many Marines from the Pacific are still around. We are losing a wealth of knowlege and experience everyday.

    And, I think the current administration could use some SERIOUS advice from the folks down at the VFW. And, I'm not kidding. Many lessons seem to have been lost/forgotten. But that's an argument for another day.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •