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Thread: Flipped Float Plane in Figure 8 Lake?

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    Default Flipped Float Plane in Figure 8 Lake?

    I saw this when flying over figure 8 lake this afternoon. Poor guy. Anyone know what happened?
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    That is a Civil Air Patrol Beaver. They were practicing cross wind landings and flipped over Sunday evening. Three on board, no one hurt. They are working on getting the plane out of the lake.

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    And they were just getting over the other Beaver that was wasted during ski landing instruction near Kenai.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
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    Glad no one was hurt! Talk about a 1/2 million dollar lesson in how not to perform a cross wind landing on floats. I wonder what exactly happened that caused the aquatic inversion.

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    Default Salvage Crew

    Interesting how on May 27th (my 42nd birthday) a submerged float-plane salvage project of this nature falls in my lap.

    A touch & go training flight ended up a splash-dunk & sink. They hit hard!!! Must have been some horrifying noises as she went in... surprised no injuries. The plane came to rest on the mud bottom, upside down, out in the middle of the lake.

    The floats looked half way between a crushed over-ripened banana and one of those messy burritos with ingredients spilling out through multiple cracks in the tortilla. Floats were half torn off. Front cowling blown off. Wings (particularly one) were significantly damaged/torn. Prop and spinner where good.

    The project took day of 27th, all night, into morning of the 28th, and was successful from our dealings. We submerged then strapped full-sized Catarafts and raft thwarts to the plane then inflated them underwater with a Carlson barrel pump. Spent the daylight/moonlight hours and it took 8 Catarafts plus 14 thwarts to raft it from the middle of the lake to the shoreline. The rest of the time was spent deflating, retooling and fastening hand winches, then flipping her back over.

    Three determined guys with the right stuff in a 24hour window.... we gotter done!!!
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    Member mit's Avatar
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    Now fly it out.
    Tim

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Does anyone know the actual wind conditions from the day they flipped her over?

    Brian, did your dad used to fly Chinooks?
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Does anyone know the actual wind conditions from the day they flipped her over?

    Brian, did your dad used to fly Chinooks?
    Back in the '50s Dad Kenneth Richardson was stationed in Sitka for Public Health service as a Doctor flyin' mostly Goose and PBY to vilages of southeast back when Tuberculosis was a real problem. He later served as doctor in the Coast Guard on patrol Cutters between Honolulu and Tokyo.

    Mostly he is well known as an eye doctor and now retired.

    Another Ken Richardson worked for many years for Regal Air - flew me on raft trips all over the State... great pilot --- super experienced bush flyer... heck of good guy!!! Not sure if he flew Helicopters?

    Winds were not torquing by any stretch out there the day and night we were working --- like maybe 5 to tops 15 (supposedly much the same conditions out there the past few days).

    Not making any real assessments as I'm no expert flyer nor eye-witness: Aftermath 'looked' to me like pilot error on too fast a touch/go... basically airspeed at a good clip like flyin' way too low & tippin a wing in from crosswind or whatever, plus too much downward angle of floats on entry... whatever the case - Bottom line - scary wreck! Darn lucky to all get out and away. Mid summer-like warm/calm water and weather conditions, plus having the close proximity to Anchorage likely helped survivability.... just as it aided our part of safer, better prepared, and more efficient salvaging op.

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    Default Couple pics

    These are pics when we were done and one toward the end of our part of the op.
    You can see the moon setting on the horizon.

    Nobody is flyin' this one out...
    This Beaver has some really serous damages!
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    First class salvage!

    Excellent techniques and great photographs.

  11. #11

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    I'm guessing this student isn't going to get signed off in the beaver for a while. I hope he was a sport and purchased a round of Fuit of the Looms for his passengers. I am glad no one got hurt. It always hurts when you see a beaver get messed up since there are finite number of them in service.

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    That sucks! hopefully she will fly again someday.

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