Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27

Thread: Kenai rainbow techniques

  1. #1
    Member Ripface's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    320

    Default Kenai rainbow techniques

    I was hoping some of you would share with me some techniques for catching rainbows in the Kenai. I haven't fished for them there yet, but I'd like to this summer. Do they pretty much just hit on flies, or can I use a traditional setup. What baits should I use? What structure should I look for? Is it best to float the river, upriver? I'm pretty much clueless so any and all tips would help. Thanks in advance.
    "Wine can of their wits the wise beguile, Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile." - Homer, Odyssey

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    516

    Default What time of year?

    Be carefull using baits. There are times and places it's regulated. I want to say bait for rainbows is almost not allowed. Not 100% sure though check the regs. All sections have good spots. Two lures to always have are a egg pattern fly and small vibrax spinner in variuos colors. It also depends how you will be fishing. good luck
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

  3. #3
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    I'd fly fish its vastly suyperior. No bait in the middle or upper river and no bait in the lower river before july. Don't use bait unless you plan on keeping fish, and don't plan on keeping fish so don't use bait. It all depends on timing to know what to use.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  4. #4
    Member Ripface's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    320

    Default

    By baits, I mean anything used to catch fish, I wasn't even considering organic baits when I originally typed "bait." Maybe you could elaborate on different setups for different times of the season.
    "Wine can of their wits the wise beguile, Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile." - Homer, Odyssey

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,073

    Default

    That is a much bigger question than you may realize. Time of year, place on the river all matter, and most importantly an EO (emergency order) usually directed at King fishermen also affect rainbow fishermen. Let's start small and pick a section of river and a time and we can go from there!

  6. #6
    Member RMiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    1,736

    Default

    Whatever you choose for an offering just remember that you may hook into one of these. So be prepared with a little heavier gear.

    36 length x 24 girth @ 24-27 pounds.
    Last edited by RMiller; 02-19-2008 at 00:20.

  7. #7
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Aberdeen WA
    Posts
    4,516

    Default

    There is a time and place for bait-slingers to target trout. And yes, it can be done responsibly. A future article in STS magazine will be addressing that very topic soon.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

  8. #8
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post
    There is a time and place for bait-slingers to target trout. And yes, it can be done responsibly. A future article in STS magazine will be addressing that very topic soon.
    I agree completely, stocked lakes and ice fishing come to mind, I've caught a lot of trout on bait and bait kills probably 10 times as many trout as flies or even spinners do. So when I only fish with bait when I plan on keeping fish which is never for trout, the exception to this is pike which tend to not swallow herring for some reason.

    Back to the origonal question hire a guide and do what he tells you and take notes otherwise theres a pretty long learning curve to do well on the kenai, it only took me about 6 years to get bows to hit consistently.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  9. #9
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ripface View Post
    By baits, I mean anything used to catch fish, I wasn't even considering organic baits when I originally typed "bait." Maybe you could elaborate on different setups for different times of the season.
    I bet you fish a lot of bass eh? I hooked a nice 25+ inch bow on a silver spinner bait once while pike fishing. Up here bait means anything that has a scent.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  10. #10

    Default Hell I'll answer the question...

    In the early part of summer, (After June 15) I like big patterns that mimmick flesh or big leeches. Also smolt patterns that look like floundering salmon smolt work well. I catch alot of huge bows while backtrolling for kings actually. Some of these crazy trout will actually hit a K16 kwikfish, so pulling smaller plugs can be very effective. The smaller Storm lures in blue colors are deadly, make sure they rattle!

    Later in the summer it gets tougher. I ussually switch over to beads or egg patterns when there are some salmon on reds, but big leech patterns still work then. Early fall is all about the egg.

    Go get em!

    -sc

  11. #11
    Member Ripface's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    320

    Default

    Thanks Sockeye Charlie, you actually answered some of my questions, and helped me to learn how to fish for them. I know I could hire a guide, but I thought I'd post here and try to learn a bit, since we don't have much else to do this winter. It seems like this might be a big secret, like trying to get someone to tell you where they caught a muskie in MN.
    "Wine can of their wits the wise beguile, Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile." - Homer, Odyssey

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Ripface-

    Sockeye Charlie has it right. Ditto on the large flesh patterns, I like to try to dead drift them, sometimes using an indicator, just like you would a nymph. Beads are effective after the salmon start to drop eggs. I'll usually start with an 8mm or 10 mm about mid-august to mimic a king egg, then drop to a 6mm or 8mm a few weeks later as the sockeye start to spawn. Check with Troutfitters in Cooper Landing for current sizes and colors.

    I'll add a few things that have surprised me about the Kenai and helped me learn. Most of the time I'm flyfishing, so this will be of limited use if you are pulling plugs or spinfishing.

    The trout seem to be in the current more than in the slack. It's a surprise to me coming from Wyoming, but most if not all of the largest rainbows and dollies I've caught have been in much deeper and much faster water than I would have expected. So, that means that I find myself using a 10-12 foot leader a lot of the time, and also a bit more weight than i think I would need. It seems like 2 of the bb size splitshot 8"-18" above the bead are about right. Make sure the splitshot are occasionally bouncing on the bottom. Don't forget to check the regs to make sure your set up is legal, it varies a bit between the upper and the middle river.
    Right when I started fishing the Kenai, a guy that I work with suggested the '10 minute rule'...if you are using a particular color bead and don't produce a fish within 10 minutes, try a different color. I seem to stretch it a bit longer, but different colors work best on different days, probably due to some variations in egg age, ambient light, etc. Switch 'em up and keep trying. Scott Haugen's book Flyfishing Alaska has a good writeup on bead fishing, too. Finally, and especially when fishing around spawning kings, location, location, location. It seems like redd/spawning sites are relatively consistent year after year. If you find a good spot, it'll probably keep producing.
    Good Luck!

    Tom

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Wink For what it's worth. . .

    Take this for what it's worth because having never done it, I've only gathered the following from reading.

    It seems a popular technique for Kenai rainbows is a combination of bobber-fishing and lining. One pegs a plastic "bead/lure" simulating a salmon egg some inches above the hook, about 2-inches more or less as I recall. A small bobber (called a "strike indicator" by some) is placed on the line above the hook according to the depth of the water to be fished. Sinkers in the form of lead shot clamped on the line above the lure are usually needed to keep the lure near the bottom more or less depending on the current

    One casts above the fish's suspected lie, letting the lure drift through, and when the bobber stops, the line is jerked back, disengaging the bead/lure out of the fish's mouth and lining the fish, hopefully setting the hook in the region of the fish's mouth.

    Check this method with someone more experienced than I before giving it a try. I may be mistaken on some details.

    Tight lines. . . !


  14. #14
    Member arcticfox77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    191

    Default marcus has a good idea of it

    i usually like to fish the russian river with beads but let me elaborate, i tie a small ginger colored tuft of rabbit skin to my gamakatsu circle hook to hide the hook. it looks like a piece of decaying flesh, i then pin a bead no more than two inches from the hook, usually a 6mm bead on my leader and attach enough splitshots to feel the weight tapping the bottom(anywhere between 8-12 inches from the bead) find some reds and toss your line into them, the rainbows are either mixed in with them or directly behind them. you would be suprised what color beads will work, sometimes they get tired of seeing the same thing over and over.

  15. #15

    Default

    be careful using beads on the Russian. Check your regs on it, beads aren't allowed until sometime in late august. But that being said, beads will work great in the russian, especially considering they only see them part of the year.

  16. #16
    Member arcticfox77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    191

    Default late in the season

    yeah cmo i fish there pretty late in the season, usually early sept. all the crowds are gone but the fish are plenty.

  17. #17
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by cmo1977 View Post
    be careful using beads on the Russian. Check your regs on it, beads aren't allowed until sometime in late august. But that being said, beads will work great in the russian, especially considering they only see them part of the year.
    Bead are always legal in the russian if you take the time to melt them to hooks
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  18. #18

    Thumbs up NICE fish

    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    Whatever you choose for an offering just remember that you may hook into one of these. So be prepared with a little heavier gear.

    36 length x 24 girth @ 24-27 pounds.
    That is the biggest rainbow I have ever seen. How did you land such a thing. That thing had to be one strong fish and with that kenai current. I think I would be afraid to hook into one of those.
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

  19. #19
    Member RMiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    1,736

    Default

    A friend from work caught it this last November. I believe he fought it for 40 minutes. There was fish biologist present who estimated its weight at 27 pounds. I ran it threw a fish calcultor which put it at 24+ pounds. I belive it was caught on a bead fly also.

  20. #20

    Default Kenai Trout

    95% of the fishing is with a strike indicator (called a bobber in the rest of the world) w/ a 9 or 10 foot leader on a floating line. Either a bead if the salmon are dropping eggs or a fleshfly. Short casts upstream and dead drift back through. Experiment with different colors of both beads and flesh until you find out what's working. If you can fish a dead drift, you'll catch fish. Sometimes it can be real frustrating, seeming that nothing is working though. Its ridiculously easy later in the summer/fall and quite a bit more challenging earlier. Hooking up w/ a guide is a great $180 or so spent. Maybe its more now. There are other techniques that work, sometimes real well, but that's how most people do it.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •