Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Totally new at this

  1. #1

    Default Totally new at this

    Okay, so I am new to Alaska and really new to bear hunting. I was told it is illegal to bait bears and hunt them (looks pretty much on here like the same thing we do for deer down south) - so I am wondering if it really is illegal but just for some bears or was I misinformed?

    And what (besides a rifle and regular hunting license) does someone need to bear hunt? I am sure there is a tag for it, but is there anything else? And what are the bear seasons?

    And after killing a bear, then what? Any special rules?


    Just wanting to do it right. Thanks.


    Also, do you have to get hunting permission, or can anyone bait and hunt on public lands? Don't want to hunt the wrong place. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the 907
    Posts
    2,326

    Default

    Can't kill Grizz over a bait. Blackies are fair game as long as they don't have cubs.

    Spring April 15-June30. Here where im at anyway.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,892

    Default

    Sir with all respect here have you picked up a copy of the the fish and game reg. Please do. After you read them if you have any question we would all love to help you out thanks Mike.

  4. #4
    Member AK145's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    640

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Explorer View Post
    Okay, so I am new to Alaska and really new to bear hunting. I was told it is illegal to bait bears and hunt them (looks pretty much on here like the same thing we do for deer down south) - so I am wondering if it really is illegal but just for some bears or was I misinformed?

    And what (besides a rifle and regular hunting license) does someone need to bear hunt? I am sure there is a tag for it, but is there anything else? And what are the bear seasons?

    And after killing a bear, then what? Any special rules?


    Just wanting to do it right. Thanks.




    Also, do you have to get hunting permission, or can anyone bait and hunt on public lands? Don't want to hunt the wrong place. Thanks.
    Kinda yes to all the above.....get a hold of a reg book and the baiting requirements and restrictions are listed and pretty easy and straight forward to understand.

    There are restrictions on say what you can use for bait, or hunter ed requirments for certain units, what meat has to be salvaged depending on the time of year....etc.

  5. #5

    Default 1st time

    AK explore,
    When ever i have started hunting in a new place, i have found it best to ask hunters if they need help. Have them take me out and show me the ropes. although you might not get to "hunt" shoot, you will at least get a good idea of what you need to do and how to do it. When i got up here ten years ago i tried on my own for the first few years, and it was slow going, the rules alone take time to get right, then i asked for help and many hunters took their time and shared ideas and thoughts, they took me out and showed me the ropes. I do my best to repay this every year, i am taking two "new" hunters to my bait stand this year. Ask, help, and learn, alaska is like many other places yet very different at the same time. Get the regs and read them, hang out at your local Fish and game office,, ask them questions (remember we pay them, and they are there for us, most are very nice and helpful). If you have any questions just pm me. And let people on here now what part of Alaska you are in, Hunting around Anchorage is very different then Fairbanks.

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,416

  7. #7

    Default

    Thanks for all the responses. I found that link yesterday after looking through a lot of threads, but thanks for sending it. It was very helpful and informative.

    Hillbilly, thanks for the help offer - I may take you up on that.

    Last thing though, if you can't use bait for brown bears, are you still allowed to hunt them just without bait or how does that work? I looked around on AK Fish and Game site and didn't find the answer. I am sure it is there, but I didn't see it.

    As to getting regs, I will do that as soon as I can get by the F&G office.

    I am in Palmer/Wasilla area, btw. Would prefer to hunt here or north-east or -west of here. Don't want to get around Anchorage and doubt I'll drive down Kenai way that much for bear hunting.

  8. #8
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    1,450

    Thumbs up print them off online

    You can just go to the ADF&G site and print off the regs, as they are in PDF files and you can pick and choose the portion of the regs you want to print off. http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...ations.hunting
    I don't print off the whole book of either the fishing regs or the hunting regs. just the area I intend on hunting or fishing.
    I also enjoy being able to look at the regs online and being able to enlarge the print on my screen and also the maps.
    No reason to print off a pile of paper you won't need or use.
    you can buy your license online too.
    one thing also to remember is that this state has several different managers of " public Property"... State and federal parks etc. the rules within the different management areas will oft times have well,,,,, different rules for use. such as the Kenai national refuge has baiting of bears, but have different registration rules etc. than say the state managed land nearby..
    Be careful to always know what unit # you are in, and who manages that exact area you intend on hunting , or even just pitching a tent on.
    For example.... I once many years ago decided to float a river over in the Wood river area near Dillingham.. I planned the trip, got all my maps, hired a pilot,, and when I showed up.. found out that the river I wanted to float required a permit to float, and that they let only so many permits to float out..
    I had to hustle to change to plan B and float a different river.
    Sometimes the people managing their area get confused too, so know where you are at all times.
    Once I was cutting firewood on Native owned land that was bordered by a National refuge... I had permission to harvest the wood from the Native Corp, but was approached by a Naitional refuge person and the officer attempted to ticket me. I let them write the ticket and let the fellow give me a scolding about using a chainsaw on his land.., then when he was done and handed me the ticket.., I invited him to show me on his map that I was actually on refuge property..
    I was over a half mile away from the refuge, and where we stodd he didn't have enough power to pull his hat off concerning the use of a saw..
    I have also seen problems with hunters and trappers having to cross different property management lands to access their traps or hunting or fishing areas. One fellow I know had his traps pulled and confiscated by the officer. A note left at a trap site told him who to contact..
    He took his maps, and GPS cords, and after a few minutes of discussion with the fellow, got his traps back and a sheepish "sorry"...
    Also,, Its a good idea to do extra homework on the area you wish to use in other ways... such as this..
    Once I got a call from a customer of mine that was paddling a canoe down the Moose river here on the kenai.. he and his family had just picked up 3 people that were attempting to walk out the Moose river.. they were covered in swamp mud and were hungry and more than thirsty as they were out of drinking water and would not drink the tanic stream water for fear of Beaver Fever..
    Seems a nice young gal working the counter at the wildlife refuge suggested a nice half day paddle from Watson lake down the east moose river to the main moose and to the bridge out..
    the stream was so low that the folks tired of dragging the canoe started walking the swampy stream.. ended up spending the night in the tall grass with mosquitos to many to endure, so they rubbed mud on their faces and exposed body parts... made it to the main moose the next morning and tried to walk out.. almost impossible..
    that is where our custiomers came up on them and loaded them in two canoes and brought them out..
    The group was still several miles up the moose when I got cell phone call.
    I hurried to the moose with a small aluminum boat and motor and headed up stream.. When I got to them and relieved the canoes of the extra people, these poor Nimrods were too exhausted to even talk..
    when I got them back to my place, showered and fed and watered up.. it took a bit of convincing from me to stop them from going over to the refuge and making a scene..
    I told them that oft times the refuge hires college age kids from outside for summer help.
    I ended up taking my son and his friend down the east moose to retrive the canoe for them ... REI was happy to get it back

    So what I am saying is..... Read alot, and do searches before you just ask.. this site has a great archive of information, and often times you will find the answer you are looking for in one of those threads from the past..
    If you can't find much info in the search, then bounce it off the respective group..
    ,,,, and oh yea,,,
    Welcome to Alaska and the Forum..
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks, Max - for both the hospitality AND the info. I will definitely do my homework! Just spend the weekend down in Homer and took a long time coming back to stop and see the area.....absolutely wonderful - love it!

  10. #10
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I didn't see anyone mention it but you have to be an AK resident before you can hunt brown/grizzly bear. That takes 1 year of living in the state. That is 12 consecutive complete months so after the anniversary of your arrival (if applied for residency on 5 Sept 2009 you could hunt 6 Sept 2010). There are special regulations regarding military residency that are available in the regulations as well.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •