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Thread: Kenai dipnet questions

  1. #1
    Member
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    Sep 2007
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    Anchorage, AK
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    Default Kenai dipnet questions

    So, I'm totaly new to dipnetting, but I just bought a 14' Zodiac and two 4' short handle dipnets and I'm anxious to give it a shot, but I've got a few questions.

    1. Where is the best place to launch the boat? I'll be using a tilt bed ATV trailer and launch wheels.

    2. Where is the best (most quiet/ secluded) place to car camp (in tents) within 30 minutes or so of the boat launch? I don't like campgrounds much, but if that's my only choice, can you recommend a nice one? Do I need reservations in advance?

    3. How exactly is dipnetting from a boat accomplished? I've never even seen it done. Do you motor slightly faster than the current with the bow pointed downstream?

    4. What else do I need to know? I intend to get as much practice as possible with the boat before I go and I know I need a permit. Any helpful advise would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks folks,
    Zeb

  2. #2
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    May 2009
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    Default

    what model outboard powers your zodiac?

  3. #3

    Default Kenai boat dipnetting

    1. Launch site: We launch our skiff at the Warren Ames Bridge wayside. Because it's little, it saves us fighting with the big boys at the city boat launch. We stay clear of them period.
    2. Check the tides. If you launch around high tide, you won't have to slug all your gear through the muck and carcasses to the water.
    3. Check the tides. Your best fishing is often two hours on either side of high and low tide. During slack tide, the fish are still there, but milling all over the river. Your best fishing is when they are making deliberate upriver progress in bunches.
    4. When you find a bunch, stay with them by looping steadily upriver. Sometimes your loop can be fairly tight as you sift through a bunch that's not moving upriver very fast.
    5. Balance your net load on both sides of your boat. Have a designated non-fishing driver until you're experienced with the shifting dynamics of current, differential net drag, catching and de-netting fish, keeping nets out of your prop, looking out for other boats and buoys, staying clear of shoals, and river/tide influences on speed.
    6. Tie a line from the bow to your net/pole attachment and roll it around the pole a few times so you can adjust the length when your net is in the current. You should not be fighting to hold your net perpendicular to the line of travel. Let the rope do the work.
    7. Your motor speed will be influenced by whether you're floating down with the current or fighting the incoming tide.
    8. Keep the floor of your boat clear of miscellany. You may quickly fill your cooler and have to start filling your boat.
    9. Prepare your mind for a king. They happen.
    10. WEAR YOUR PFD and demand that everyone else does too.

    Hope this helps.
    ~tr

  4. #4
    Member TR's Avatar
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    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
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    391

    Default

    Nice boat load of fish.

    One thing I saw that looked pretty slick, some people have a 32 gallon garbage can standing in the middle of the boat with ice. Dump the fish in there.

  5. #5
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    Sep 2007
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    Anchorage, AK
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    Jisler: Motor is a 20hp Tohatsu short shaft tiller (114lbs), boat is an Alaska Series Alaskan Ranger 13'9".

    gr8fl: Thanks for the helpful tips!

  6. #6
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    May 2009
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    a-town
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    Default

    i was just checking to see if you're using an old 2-stroke. they won't let you on the river with one of those in july

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