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Thread: Revolver vs. Pistol vs. Ammo Cost?

  1. #1

    Default Revolver vs. Pistol vs. Ammo Cost?

    Will the revolver regain some of its old popularity due to the cost of factory high performance ammo?

    Would it be accurate to use $1.00 per round on average to calculate the cost of this ammo?

    Unless one handloads, the cost of the hundred plus (300 min. ?) rounds thru a pistol to prove its reliablity with any given load (and all the magazines), now becomes a significant cost of owning a pistol as opposed to a revolver.

    Especially, for the average buyer that does not shoot as a hobby. With a revolver, I can get by with checking my zero. Any other issue will most likely become apparent during the relatively few rounds it takes to zero it.

  2. #2

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    The $300 (300 rounds at $1 each) buys a real credible reloading outfit.

    With reloading though, that makes the choice easy for me. It's revolver all the way. I do about 2% of my shooting on a range and the rest is all in the field. And there's nothing that knocks up your reloading cost faster than losing half your brass every time you go shooting. I'm not a semi-auto fan specifically because I'm not a range shooter and don't have much chance to recover my brass. With a revolver, I never lose a round. Along with casting my own bullets, I doubt I've got 10 cents a round tied up in my ammo. That's pushing it down toward 22 rimfire prices.

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    Default Training training training. Reloading reloading Reloading...

    Great point Bukshot! Not only the cost, but the limited number of manufacturers that make certain ammo have almost convinced me to setup RELOADING for the .38special. The thought of my own wadcutters, 158grain HP's, etc...and I've got lots of old brass.

    But are pistol primers still $75/hundred? (kidding...kinda).

  4. #4

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    i reload a few diff rounds for my personal weapons in the following calibers ..308 for the rifle in the fmj and hunting wieghts of 165 and 180 grain bullets weights and the 38 special and the 45.acp and the 460 revolver rounds for hunting and self defense and target pratice..the self defense loads are really want i call the same load as the remington 230 grain golden saber load that the company makes for the 1911 pistol.. the rest are pretty much pratice rounds for the 38 special and i not been able to make a round up for the 460 for hunting just yet but iam working on it ..

    the only rounds i do not reload for is the 12.ga shotgun which i need to start to and the 22.lr cal rimfire..

  5. #5
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    Default Finding brass....

    ....that's been ejected on the ground from the autoloaders is one reason to shoot the revolvers. It is harder and harder today to find components even if you have a good reloading setup. Hanging on to the brass from a pistol when you're out in the woods or fields is tough to do. I have a good supply of brass for my pistol calibers but still hate to abandon it in the fields.

    Also from my main supplier I find primers listed at about $25. per 1000 but they have been out of stock for months with no signs of changing. I have a standing order in but must wait for primers and powder. With wholesalers out of stock so much this drives retail shelf prices up. I've never seen $75 per 100 prices but per 1000, yes.

    I have an array of handguns, pistol and revolvers and shoot my revolvers more now because they seem to be my choice in field guns in a belt holster. I have been doing a lot of range work with some auto loaders too but have a good brass catcher for them at the range and a good recovery rate for brass. I have some pistol calibers which are difficult or impossible to get brass for so I must save every piece.

    As for the requisite 300 rounds to "break in" a pistol, that could be debated. There is no magical number of rounds required for any particular pistol. Personally, I think, after the first few rounds you should have a trouble free gun. I would not trust my life to this but in my experience if a handgun fails to feed reliably after the first box of ammo, it probably is a poor design or a real lemon, given proper grip, etc.

    Some designs are so sensitive to lack of strong grip or certain ammo that they cannot be trusted, day in and day out, for general use. The Beretta 92 is one such candidate, as was the old Walther P38 and of course there were others.

    The now defunct H&K model P-7 was such a unique design and was a very well made pistol but that funcky, gas retarded, recoil operated system was ammo selective and required short interval cleaning cycles to be reliable. I always liked the old squeezers but when prices went up I sold both mine because of the tempermental traits.

    Other autoloaders I've owned have shot the first 2000 rounds with no fail to feed or fire. Guns such as all my Glocks, (Just now got 2000 rounds in the new 10mm but still have the G30 with about 1100 so far no failures). Both Kahrs I've owned, my S&W 356 TSW, an H&K USP compact in 40 S&W, my Wildeys, my Sphinx (CZ 75 clone form Switzerland) my CZ-75b SP01 version that has never failed to feed or fire after about 5000 rounds of 9x19. I have a Dan Wesson Pointman Seven that has 1200 rounds form out of the box with no failures. There are some good pistols out there that, even though the manufacturer recommends a good break in, they didn't need it.

    My revolvers almost never fail to cycle.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  6. #6
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    Entirely GREAT post Murphy!
    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    ....Also from my main supplier I find primers listed at about $25. per 1000 but they have been out of stock for months with no signs of changing. I have a standing order in but must wait for primers and powder. With wholesalers out of stock so much this drives retail shelf prices up. I've never seen $75 per 100 prices but per 1000, yes.
    And, Holy crap, I was just kidding because I remember the story about pistol primers at the shop last year during the "panic"...but I hadn't realized they DID get up to $75/1000 in places. I think instead of investing in GOLD here in the near future...it's SPAM and PISTOL PRIMERS for me!

    (and I'm only 1/2 kidding...I already stocked up on Shotty primers and canned foods)...

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    Default because I enjoy shooting

    It doesn't matter to me what I shoot, to enjoy it .
    Two factors made this the most practicle investment.
    being able to shoot any time i wanted and for the most economicical price.
    I picked up on air guns and eventually air soft as well .
    I have pellet guns and air soft guns that resemble and function similliar to the fire arm they represent. lacking is the noise the price and the velosity,the kick, but not the accuricy, at close range. Some of them are as accurate as any fire arm I have ever had up to 60 feet, air rifles up to 200 feet.
    Now I love the smell of gun powder as much as the next guy ,burnt and unburnt, and load my own .357, .44 special /mag and so on . but they are to expensive by comparison, and require a shooting range to enjoy as I would like. the fun is almost the same though , infact the air guns require a little more skill for the longer range shooting .Some have velosities up to 1200 fps.Some day I'd like ti get a few of the larger caliburs rifles .32, .40, .45, and .50 And just for some of you
    who Poo Poo the idea of air guns, Lewis and Clark came across the continant with an air rifle. Check it out, people are taking big game with them, even thought their velosities are significantly lighter than fire arms most of you carry. Accuricy and bullet placement are criticle and require greater skill, but these people are successful, none the less killing both bear and buffalo.
    they don't need a primer.

  8. #8
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    Default

    And many folks laugh about it...but some of the BEST tactical guys are training with air...because it gives a chance to practice on REALISTIC moving targets...without expensive simunitions.

    I LOVE paintball for that reason. It's way FUN for an old dude (approaching 50) like me...and it's GOOD training.
    My darned heartbeat get's pumping (from the adrenaline) like you wouldn't believe.

    Can be very realistic depending upon the type of paintball you play, and who you shoot with.
    Our field out at "Cowtown" is pretty cool.



    Way too much fun! And, keeps ya young!

  9. #9

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    does cowtown still do the cops vs firemen and then cops and firemen vs anybody teams for the fund raiseing for the fallen officers and firemen deal out there at cowtown with the big fund raiser drinner and shoot after the dinner

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    Quote Originally Posted by henry2 View Post
    does cowtown still do the cops vs firemen and then cops and firemen vs anybody teams for the fund raiseing for the fallen officers and firemen deal out there at cowtown with the big fund raiser drinner and shoot after the dinner
    I hadn't heard about that one Henry, but that sounds like Cowtown. There's a bunch of charity and teambuilding events that go on there. TOO much FUN!!! The place is like a big family. I got hooked up with a buddy of mine when we brought a bunch of building materials to donate for new barricades, building, etc.

    There's an old bus, and an "Alamo" building for "seiges", and an old Aircraft for "pilot rescue/warhead recovery". Lots of pretty cool "tactical" scenarios. LOTS of fun. Kinda like paintball Beirut/Blackhawk down.
    I'm still waiting to cross paths with a rattler out there though.
    I wish it was more..."in town". (<<< yup, big snake wuss here!)

    Not to hijack the thread...just to agree that there are other options for inexpensive "training".
    Great thread Bukshot!

  11. #11
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    Default

    Another inexpensive training option I plan on using (soon) is this from LaserLyte:
    http://laserlyte.com/Laser_Training_...RO/LT-PRO.html
    The Laser works with anything over 2" barrel. The new snubby will have a 3" barrel.
    I've heard good reports on them. Perfect for "living room" training drills.
    Pay for itself in ammo AND gasoline savings.

    Should be FUN in front of the TV with all the campaign adds coming up soon.

  12. #12

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    Due to the higher cost of ammo these days, I prefer revolvers over autos for the reason that I shoot less. Autos = high shot capacity = $$. I picked up a Colt Python & a Smith 642 as my primary & carry guns, and I find myself working more on accuracy rather than volume. No more unleashing a magazine of 9mm on a target for me.

    Paintball's still pretty expensive. It's good for close-range realism, but I never figured on saving money whenever I played. It's just for fun. About a decade ago I sold my ICD Desert Fox blow-forward for a CCI Phantom pump-action, all so I could focus more on skills and spend less on paint & air. It seems I'm doing something similar with handguns.

    While .22 lr is still pretty cheap, I've thought of picking up an airgun for small game. I don't know how the cost of a good airgun compares to an equally serviceable hunting pistol; I figure that has to factor in with cost as well.
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

  13. #13

    Default Cartridge selection vs. Ammo cost

    There is another factor to consider besides pistol vs. revolver to keep down costs for the non-handloader. This factor is the availability of the cheaper generic ( "white box" ) ammo using bullets other than full metal jacket ( and similar ). I seem to recall that the only cartridges at one chain store meeting this criteria was limited to the .357 Magnum, .357 Sig, .40 S&W, and .44 Magnum. A proper survey regarding this would be worthwhile to prospective handgun purchasers.

  14. #14
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bukshot View Post
    Will the revolver regain some of its old popularity due to the cost of factory high performance ammo?

    Would it be accurate to use $1.00 per round on average to calculate the cost of this ammo?

    Unless one handloads, the cost of the hundred plus (300 min. ?) rounds thru a pistol to prove its reliablity with any given load (and all the magazines), now becomes a significant cost of owning a pistol as opposed to a revolver.

    Especially, for the average buyer that does not shoot as a hobby. With a revolver, I can get by with checking my zero. Any other issue will most likely become apparent during the relatively few rounds it takes to zero it.
    I don't buy the argument that you only have to shoot enough ammo through a revolver to check the zero. Unless you practice frequently, you won't be competent with a handgun. I've done a fair bit of handun shooting over the years, some years alot, some years almost none. Your ability to hit goes out the window with a handgun when you don't practice. So you have to factor in the cost of ammo and range time if you plan to put a handgun to use. A handgun is of little use when you can't use it competently.

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    Default Revolver vs semi auto

    revolver= gives you 6 some time 9 shots ,depending on the gun
    auto= 9-15 or more
    revolver= must be emptied of it's spent shells
    auto =swap clips
    revolver,= double or single action
    auto= dual or single ( parabelum)
    revolver= shoots any thing, minimum loads max loads
    auto= narrow load window , type spicific
    revolver= select / chamber different loads, rotate cylinder to apply
    auto = one load
    revolver= cleaned in 5 muinets
    auto = cleaned in 1/2 hour
    revolver= drug in the dirt,blow it off and start shooting
    auto=very dirt sensitive.composits make it appear better, but the dirt just getts imbedded in. (microscopic)
    revolver=can be dropped and still work
    autos= well, good luck
    These are my own views from my own expirences my own weapons

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