Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Bear Meat Cooking Suggestions???

  1. #1
    Member germe1967's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska
    Posts
    151

    Default Bear Meat Cooking Suggestions???

    Hey All,

    I have been very careful to teach my kids never to kill something you aren't going to eat. This, of course, excludes self defense but if you're here, I'm sure you understood that.
    What I am hoping for is to get a number of suggestions as to how to cook the meat so that it doesn't taste bad. This is a task I have had absolutely no success with so far. I saw one guy said "cook it slow" and use "spring meat, not fall"
    Recipes, spices that work, any information would be nice! Thanks all!

  2. #2
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,599

    Default

    Cook like a pork roast. Its very good corned like beef or made into sausage,also smoked like ham.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Soldonta, Alaska
    Posts
    315

    Default Spring Black Bear

    Every black bear I have harvested in the spring has a very mild flavored taste. I grind most of it up and make burger, breakfast sausage, and polish sausage. The roasts are good and you can make pulled "bear" sandwhiches that are like pork. I have feed alot of people bear burgers off the grill that everyone liked. I like to add 10-15% pork butt roast meat to the bear meat when I grind it up. If you dont want to do that you can add some beef suet. Enjoy!

  4. #4

    Default

    I did bear for the first time this week. I always grill a few chops right away. I marinaded some with tabasco, garlic, butter, and paprika. Not bad, maybe a little chewy.

    Then did a few more a couple days later with same marinade but lightly browned and then baked for an hour with cream of mushroom soup and wild rice over the top. (Real good)

    The rest I ground and added 25% pork and used two different high mtn summer sausage flavors and three different personal mixes and stuffed some of each into summer sausage, ring, and pepper sticks and smoked with plumb wood. (Very good)

  5. #5
    Member bushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Now residing in Fairbanks from the bush
    Posts
    4,363

    Default

    germe,

    Main thing about bear meat is that since it can carry trichinosis (like pork) it has to be well cooked, never medium.

    So if you do a roast, ensure it is all the way cooked thoroughly, same with steaks or burger.

    We like to can bear a lot because we can't always keep it. And in doing that I've found I really like the ground bear meat (we jar it ground). It's great in spaghetti sauce and any other dish you'd use ground meat in, or burgers. Chicken fried steaks are real good too. Not sure why you are getting bad-tasting meat, could be in the way it's handled.

    One other thing we like to do is smoke a whole bear ham or part of, over alder. Smoke for a couple days then make that into roasts, great flavor. Go the spaghetti route with ground bear and that may disguise the flavor of bear.
    Good luck,

  6. #6
    Member Toddler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    556

    Default

    What Will and Chinookee said!

    I also try to take a younger bear in the spring before they have gotten to the fish. I take as many roasts as I can and make the rest into Italian Sausage (three words Black Bear Pizza). As for the roast I marinade them as follows:

    Cup Red wine (Cabernet any)
    Cup White vinegar

    Marinade overnight turning once or twice. In the morning add 4 cloves of crushed garlic, black pepper, and Marjoram to taste and marinade 4 more hours. Remove roast from marinade and retain marinade.

    Salt
    Pepper
    Allspice
    Fresh crushed garlic
    All to taste

    In a HOT pan sear roast on all sides. (use bacon grease if you have it)

    Add 1 cup of marinade to roasting pan and then bake at 325-350 for 30 min per pound or until temp reads 150 on an instant read thermometer. Remove from oven and let rest and the carry over will bring the temp to 160 (pork setting). Do not overcook! If the meat is gray lifeless and dry you have gone way to far- I say this because different ovens cook at different rates.

    Serve with a baked potato and a fresh baby spinach salad.

    Just my nickel,
    Drew
    Normal people believe that if something ain't broke, don't fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet.

    Scott Adams

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,635

    Default

    We cook it Slow , Low and Long, no matter how you apply the heat, tender that way.
    We eat 'em quick, 'cause we cant dry the meat and we like room inthe freezer for birds and berrys.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,283

    Default

    I turn a lot of my bear into sausage such as Summer Sausage and Salami...

  9. #9
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,749

    Default

    Some friends of ours cooked two black bears, whole, in a pit Hawaiian style last year; they were amazing!
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    895

    Default cured and smoked hams

    I just cooked up my first two black bears this year. I did all the other things mentioned: Burger, sausage, steaks, roasts.

    I took some of the hams and cured them in a salt,sugar type brine that I bought at alaska butcher supply. I was instructed to inject the meat several places and let it sit in brine for a couple of days. I then alder smoked it to 170 degrees (about 4 hours).

    They turned out REALLY good. I think I overcooked them a bit though. Also, some places were not cured deep inside the ham. My guess is I needed to inject them more. Still, it was a great 1st try. The hams make great sandwiches. I may take some down to my family in OR for Thanksgiving.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    SW,Ak
    Posts
    182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    We cook it Slow , Low and Long, no matter how you apply the heat, tender that way.
    We eat 'em quick, 'cause we cant dry the meat and we like room inthe freezer for birds and berrys.
    Aunt cooks bear the same way and is one of 2 people i will eat cooked bear from.
    She makes some real tasty bear.
    Family friend would have black bear turned into sausage.

  12. #12
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default Sausage

    I've got a batch of smoked polish style bear sausages being delivered in 30 minutes. It's been mixed with pork butt. The maker says they are excellent. I can't wait to try em.

    I didn't do any roasts with my old spring bear. He just needed to be ground up really well.

  13. #13
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default Great

    I had sausage in a bun last night. This morning I chopped it up and fried it with eggs.

    It's good and I'll be eating it all. I've still got some hot links yet to come but so far the breakfast sausage and Polish style are great.

  14. #14
    Member Smokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    3,334

    Default Fall Bears!

    Have shot several fall blackies and all tasted good to me and my family. They are fat from blueberries and I think that helps!
    We tenderize ( pound ) the cuts and then bread them and slow fry them, for quite some time like Stranger said, and they turn out like breaded pork chops! Never have any left over for sure! Season with whatever you like.

  15. #15

    Default Sausage and Roasts

    You can never go wrong with bear sausage in the freezer. We did a roast a few weeks back and added a can of coke, with the other fixins, and it tasted great. Good Luck.
    "Shoot straight and keep your powder dry"

  16. #16
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daved View Post
    I just cooked up my first two black bears this year. I did all the other things mentioned: Burger, sausage, steaks, roasts.

    I took some of the hams and cured them in a salt,sugar type brine that I bought at alaska butcher supply. I was instructed to inject the meat several places and let it sit in brine for a couple of days. I then alder smoked it to 170 degrees (about 4 hours).

    They turned out REALLY good. I think I overcooked them a bit though. Also, some places were not cured deep inside the ham. My guess is I needed to inject them more. Still, it was a great 1st try. The hams make great sandwiches. I may take some down to my family in OR for Thanksgiving.
    Daved, just a tip but i get better results smoking mine over a much longer period... i made two hams las fall with the honey brine cure. i put them in white trash bags and tie them tight after injecting all along the bone about every 1-2 inches. the bag hold the brine to the meat well also and aides in mixing and turning. i never let my smoke get past 225deg and do the smoke at 160-165 usually 12-14 hours in the smoker and creates a nice tender ham. brine is minimum 72 hours. when i plan on making hams i cover the meat in brown sugar and salts and let the deep freeze work on that until i am ready to get to work on them for real... 3-4-5 months somtimes.... never had any complaints

    cooking bear meat for dinner... thing to keep in mind is that it has a much denser mussle fiber then moose or beef... look at the rings in the meat like those in a tree... you will see the bear has a ton more rings per inch then moose or beef does... it takes much longer to break down to a chewable state.. I love bear breakfast sausage with sweet pork fat, and regular burger fried up and spread with mirical whip on bread... YUM!
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  17. #17
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    Spring bear makes for a fine yankee pot roast or sauerbraten
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    552

    Default

    My wife always cooks it slow in a tomato sauce in the crock pock. The acid from the tomato sauce breaks downs the fibers in the muscle tissue and adds a little flavor. After slow cooking till it is well done she will then prepare it like any other meat (roast, stew, pulled pork, etc...).
    I love it.

  19. #19

    Default

    I think there are two aspects that have to be considered:

    First is how the bear is handles, if the weather is warm the fat on a bear will quickly go rancid and make the meat slimy and tangy ( I hear this complaint a lot from hunters). At 60 degrees the fat can start to go rancide in a little as 12 hours and if warm the hide and all the fat has to be removed as quickly as possible or get the animal to a freezer where the temperature can be drought down quickly.

    Second, all wild game flavor seem to benefit when the recipe calls for tomatoes, pork and green peppers and the best recipes have all three.
    Although it does not affect the taste, I highly agree with cooking it slow and if in doubt cook it slower. Also, bear meat is tougher, so I personally do not do steaks, just hamburger, use it in stews and do roasts.

    Hope this helps.

  20. #20
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Willow, AK
    Posts
    3,357

    Default

    We use bear like beef. Its a very sweet, delicious meat. Use the meat thermometer, so it doesn't overcook. Depending on roast size, it can usually be cooked to 150 and removed, and the heat will continue to rise inside for a little while. Our inventory usually goes Boneless hams, roasts, breakfast, italian and andui sausage, summer sausage, ribs, backstrap and tenderloins. If its a fat bear we add some back into the sausage, and render the rest.

    If the bear is already bad when you shoot it, good luck! I'd grind all into summer sausage or pepper sticks, which are highly seasoned with smoke added to help blend the bad flavor in with the good.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •