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Thread: slot limit

  1. #1
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default slot limit

    Was just reading about the slot limit restriction form 46" to 55'' and wondering where, and how much that cuts out your catch? What weights is that generally eliminating?

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Talk to Doc. He has posted alot of info on that and can tell you everything you need to know. It is really protecting some good gene pool fish. I am not an expert by any means on the weights but id guess 45 to 60 lbs. Im sure doc will chime in on this one. He is a big time advocate of the slot limit. After reading his post and info I let a very NICE slot fish go in 08 when it was after you were allowed to keep them. It makes sense like the spike fork or 50 rule in moose.
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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Statistically 5 out of every 6 fish encountered will be a legal keeper.

    The latest rendition of the slot limit protects the physically biggest 1/6 of the early run from a dose of wood shampoo.

    An early run fish larger than the slot limit is an incredibly rare beast. Since the inception of the slot limit regulation in 2003, NOT ONE has been documented.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post
    Statistically 5 out of every 6 fish encountered will be a legal keeper.

    The latest rendition of the slot limit protects the physically biggest 1/6 of the early run from a dose of wood shampoo.

    An early run fish larger than the slot limit is an incredibly rare beast. Since the inception of the slot limit regulation in 2003, NOT ONE has been documented.
    I thought they went to "grill camp".

  5. #5

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    Weight is going to depend a lot on girth, as well as length. We got two last year that illustrate this beautifully. One was 49 inches and hit the scale after bleeding at 55 pounds 9 ounces. The other was an even 50 inches, but weighed less at 50 pounds 2 ounces after bleeding. I'm betting a 55" fish won't have much trouble topping 60 pounds if it's got shoulders.

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    Here is the link to the latest Kenai River early-run king salmon report.

    http://www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/FedAidPDFs/FDS10-19.pdf

  7. #7
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post

    An early run fish larger than the slot limit is an incredibly rare beast. Since the inception of the slot limit regulation in 2003, NOT ONE has been documented.

    I'll have to retract that statement...

    Got my facts mixed up.

    The slot limit was enacted to conserve ER5-o kings. To that end NOT ONE 5-ocean king has been documented in the creel sampling since the inception of the slot rule.

    There has been ONE documented early run king exceeding the upper size of the slot limit. Scale analysis showed it was a 4-ocean male.

    Was just reading about the slot limit restriction form 46" to 55'' and wondering where, and how much that cuts out your catch? What weights is that generally eliminating?
    Fish bigger than 45-50 pounds will generally be eliminated from the harvestable pool of fish.

    A 46" Kenai fish with typical 3 x 5 proportions is gonna weigh about 46-47 pounds.

    A 55" Kenai fish is going to be a male typically weighing between 75-85 pounds depending on how long it's been in the river. A rotund tide-fresh chromer will be closer to the 85 end of that range, while a snooty, ridge-backed, slabbed-up, black-bellied, fire engine is gonna be closer to the 75 end.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

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