Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: Why do American's think.........

  1. #1

    Wink Why do American's think.........

    Alaska is the mecca of the Hunting and Fishing world?

    After all, it offers no snakes, gators, doves, quail, whitetailed deer, carp, catfish, lions, bass or hogs whatsoever.

    It has a Dept of F&G that has proven over and over again it lacks the ability to manage fish and game, as evidenced by the number of species on limited draws, closed fisheries and relinquished control to Federal Authorities.

    Most visitors to Alaska cannot access prime hunting and fishing grounds within a few minutes of their hotels or campsites. More often than not, it requires an extended stay at a remote location, air travel and no amenities, at an absurd cost.

    A Yukon Bull Moose, Dall Sheep Ram, Caribou and Grizzly Bear are fun to hunt, but way over rated as being a worthy quarry. None are wary and all are easily taken without the hunting skills, equipment and high tech camo and scent blocking clothes, that even a novice hunter needs/has in their quest for turkey's or whitetailed deer. You just simply walk up them and shoot them, that's it, hardly what most would consider a "hunt".

    Perhaps a few will recognize the reality and realize what they have in their own back yards is adequate and stop dreaming of Alaska. Seems to me people down south would be much happier if they wanted less and accepted what they have and not worry so much about what they don't have.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  2. #2
    Member AK DUX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    251

    Default

    I'll add that our hunting season last about 3-4 weeks, depending on what you're hunting. Down south, you can hunt something from Sept through January...then there's spring turkey and snow geese.
    I will disagree though that sheep or bear (even moose at times) is not worthy quarry. Yes at times...if you find a moose in rut, you could wave the American Flag and draw them in...the hard part is finding a legal bull anymore. But sheep and bear takes a tremendous amount of effort, skills (wind, sight, etc), and patience. Especially since we don't have the numbers like deer where you can sit in a stand and see a dozen or so in one sitting....then walk to your truck and drive home.
    "We're all here cuz we're not all there"

  3. #3
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,749

    Default

    Geez, Res- love it or leave it
    "Ė Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  4. #4

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Geez, Res- love it or leave it
    Thought I'd give it another month or so and see how things pan out.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Valley trash.....and proud of it.
    Posts
    813

    Default

    I think its more the mystique (spelling). after hunting up here, folks learn that there is not a bear or moose behind every tree.

  6. #6
    Member roughneck6883's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    188

    Default I love it here

    I have lived in georgia colorado montana and alaska and I will say I liked montana and alaska I hunted georgia and the hunting was pathetic and the public land is elbow to elbow and it offers very limited spot and stalk hunts I took a few animals 3 hogs 5 deer, (if they should be counted) timber rattlers in georgia and went turkey hunting though it was challenging it isnt the same as big game.I hunted colorado it was expensive even for residents and the seasons are very short but the country was beautiful but very crowded. Montana was very nice the big game season lasts about five weeks with a spring bear season tags are set at a good price for residents and there is alot of public land.
    as a long time hunter there has only been 2 locations for dream hunts africa is one and alaska is is the other......... I have enjoyed my time in alaska and will probably stay forever

  7. #7
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    717

    Default

    I grew up in Missouri where there were whitetail and turkey everywhere you turned. Sure you could hunt whitetail from Sept through December but the fact of the matter was you were still just sitting in dang tree. You give whitetail way to much credit. Sure bowhunting makes them a wary adversary but sitting on the edge of a field shooting a buck at 200 yards with a rifle doesn't take much skill. Spring and fall turkey can be fun and challenging but if a couple of fifteen year old kids sitting in a blind can call in a turkey than pretty much anyone can.

    There was no physical or geographical challenge to any of my Missouri hunting. It all came down to sitting on the edge of a field. The enjoyment of hunting Alaska is the challenge and adventure of getting to your hunting local. Then there's the scenery of Alaska. Last weekend I hiked two seperate mountains in pursuit of black bears just to not be able to locate the bears when I got up there. To me that's hunting, not sitting for four hours in a tree stand staring at a 50 acre field.

    Just like I tell all my buddies back in Missouri, after hunting in Alaska I've come to the conclusion that whitetail hunting is for wimps.
    Last edited by Alaska_Lanche; 05-24-2010 at 06:05. Reason: making it more family friendly ;)

  8. #8
    Member akula682's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    1,187

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Wonderer View Post
    I grew up in Missouri where there were whitetail and turkey everywhere you turned. Sure you could hunt whitetail from Sept through December but the fact of the matter was you were still just sitting in dang tree. You give whitetail way to much credit. Sure bowhunting makes them a wary adversary but sitting on the edge of a field shooting a buck at 200 yards with a rifle doesn't take much skill. Spring and fall turkey can be fun and challenging but if a couple of fifteen year old kids sitting in a blind can call in a turkey than pretty much anyone can.

    There was no physical or geographical challenge to any of my Missouri hunting. It all came down to sitting on the edge of a field. The enjoyment of hunting Alaska is the challenge and adventure of getting to your hunting local. Then there's the scenery of Alaska. Last weekend I hiked two seperate mountains in pursuit of black bears just to not be able to locate the bears when I got up there. To me that's hunting, not sitting for four hours in a tree stand staring at a 50 acre field.

    Just like I tell all my buddies back in Missouri, after hunting in Alaska I've come to the conclusion that whitetail hunting is for pussies.
    I agree totally, i hate sitting around waiting on the chance that a deer will walk to you, but my friends in NY think that whitetail is the best and is hard to take... even now that they opened the use of rifles... it was alright with bows and slug guns... but now you can sit on in a tree stand and shoot them from hundreds of yards away...
    Josh
    Back in Afghanistan, I hope for the last time.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    2,127

    Default Now Now guys

    There's something to be said for being able to hunt before and after work. Just gettin up early, watching the world wake up. Seeing all the different animals scurry around a treestand. I often went out for whitetails with a bow with no real intent to draw a string unless it was a whopper, and usually took a meat deer if my timing was right. It was no pressure kind of hunting, peaceful, productive and simple. I love AK and it will be my home for the forseeable future. Living in the bush I have little else to do but go out and fish/hunt and love it...I gave up a lot to be up here, and it's worth it, but I don't begrudge myself and others the different kinds of hunts that are out there, or the hunting culture I came from. Not everyone can or wants to live in AK and that leaves more room for us. Many of the seasons are short, and somehow they always end up being large expeditions and expensive (even with my own boat). It's a different and unique lifestyle up here and it works for many of us.

    When it comes to whitetails....most spot and stalk methods wouldn't work even if you had room to roam and the right cover. I've spent hours on my face crawling up to one I was lucky enough to spot just to watch it bolt at 50 yards out. Those suckers are just spooky and as such a challenge to hunt. There is an art to reading sign and finding nice bucks consistently, placing a stand (I usually used ground blinds or stillhunted), playing the wind and even getting the hammer back without them runnin away. Some areas just don't have decent bucks (the farm i grew up on never saw a buck wider than 12") and I've met guys in Illinois with 55 gallon drums of antlers larger than anything I took in my 15 years of chasing them. The smartest way to take em is to wait for them to come to you. And turkeys...well, they are just a real good time.

    And no, most Alaskan game would not be considered wary, but they are often in rough and hard to get to places and that's part of the beauty of it. Long story short, I don't think Alaska is the "hunting" mecca but it is more the "adventure" mecca. Last year I was fortunate enough to wack a beauty of a moose with a great hunting buddy. The hunt, calling, and shooting were not particularly challenging (but exciting...I love moose trashing a tree and grunting back at me) but on top of those fond memories was packin up the boats with enough gear for a week, headin 60 miles into system in my own boat, running low rivers, setting up a decent camp, packin that sucker more than a half mile to the boat, and a nice glass of scotch with friends as the sun set on a gorgeous mountain view.

  10. #10

    Default

    The thing that really sucks about AK is that they put all the food plots for deer all the way on top of the mountains! And then they had the balls not even to make an atv trail or even a regular trail to get up there! No heated blinds, bathrooms, etc.. I'm moving to Texas!

  11. #11
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default Adventure

    I know...all these access restrictions, geeze!

    Yesterday I was going over training and access issues in my head planning for my first week of August goat hunt. I think I'm going in preseason with my inflatable kayak to the head of the creek and stashing gear. That way I can load up my big billie on a boat and paddle out rather than carry it six miles to the salt water.

    If only I could drive an ATV back in their.

    Oh wait.....that would mean restricted access to hunting.

    With all this wild country we've got good hunting!

  12. #12
    New member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    alaska
    Posts
    13

    Default

    I'm with you on this one Res, I'm tired of killing all these dumb animals. After all the ten foot bears and seventy inch moose, forty inch sheep, I need to try something a little different to make it more sporting. Now I'm going to touch these critters first before I kill them with a knife to make it more interesting. Also I'm going to hire a lawyer to come with me to make sure I'm in a legal area.

  13. #13
    Member akula682's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    1,187

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fnspotter View Post
    Also I'm going to hire a lawyer to come with me to make sure I'm in a legal area.

    now there's an idea... a lawyer season.
    Josh
    Back in Afghanistan, I hope for the last time.

  14. #14
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Those that think Alaska's hunting seasons only last 3-4 wks need to get out more often. Sheep start on Aug 10th and moose season for me this year ends on Sept 25th. That's six weeks alone. Then I could head down to Kodiak and hunt deer from Aug 20th through sometime in December if I wanted. Many areas of the state have nearly year round caribou seasons and you can drive to one up the Haul Rd. I can hunt bears from mid-April through den up in October. Long seasons on wolves, coyotes, fox and other critters too. No upland birds to speak of, but enjoy hunting grouse with my kids. If you were a waterfowler it sure sounds like it's a few weeks of fun. Yes, it's more expensive and difficult to hunt up here, but it's worth it to me.

    I love Alaska. I love the whole package, even the cold weather. I like to trap when I get the time and ride snowmachines. I like to ride my ATV's, fish both salt and fresh, and hunt in the warmer months. It is also a good place to raise kids and has excellent economic opportunities.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  15. #15
    Member Bushpilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The Valley
    Posts
    152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    You just simply walk up them and shoot them, that's it, hardly what most would consider a "hunt"..
    "Hunting" is overrated. I'm looking to put meat in the freezer to eat, and working smarter, not harder is the name of the game.
    I refuse to tiptoe through life, only to arrive safely at death.


    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

    Thomas Jefferson

  16. #16
    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,939

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akula682 View Post
    now there's an idea... a lawyer season.
    Yeah, but we shoot back.

  17. #17
    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,939

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Wonderer View Post
    ... Just like I tell all my buddies back in Missouri, after hunting in Alaska I've come to the conclusion that whitetail hunting is for pussies.
    I don't agree that it's for pussies, because it depends on how and why you do it. I enjoy squirrel hunting in the woods. It's not very difficult. But I also have nearly-religious experiences--sitting there still as a rock for the first 15-20 minutes until nature finally forgets I'm there. Then, big hawks start flying right by me. Sometimes a wood chuck will walk right past. Then a squirrel shows itself and "bam." Then, wait fifteen minutes for nature to forget about me. The fact that I can do it conveniently and often is nice. Whitetail hunting can be similar or not, depending on how you do it. Squirrel and whitetail hunting are not like carribou hunting, but they're not supposed to be.

    And aside from whitetail hunting, you can hunt black bears, elk, mule deer, mountain lions, etc ... in the lower 48. Some guys I know trek 10-20 miles a day near treeline many days when elk hunting in the Rockies. It's real-man stuff. It's hard.

    I've walked 15 miles a day easily when javelina hunting in New Mexico. when I've hunted withetail in kansas and virginia, I've sat on my butt in the morning and late afternoon, but, in the middle, I've quietly hiked around pretty good distances, certainly many miles. Last January, I went to a giant farm in Maryland to hunt whitetail in temperatures in the teens. It was not as demanding as many alaskan hunts. But the seven framers who also hunted, got nothing. I did. It wasn't easy.

    And I occasionally like going on a "*****" whitetail or squirrel or pig hunt or whatever. When I lived in Colorado, I loved climbing the 14ers. But some days, I preferred a relaxing day fishing a river or camping with friends. I don't think every hunt has to be nearly physically-impossible to be worth enjoying.

    There is a lot to do down here if one wants to. I have read through the other thread, but I think that was Murphy's main intended point. Alaska arguably has better big game hunting options on the whole than any other state. But Colorado arguably has better big game hunting opportunities than Virginia (or nearby). But I'm stuck here for the time being. and anyone who wants to, can push the envelope even here or in WV. Next year, I am going to black bear hunt miles into a Wilderness Area in the national forest where no one can go except on foot. We likely will be completely alone and can push ourselves as hard as we want. Success rates are lower, by far, than the frankly easier (to succeed) bear hunting in Alaska. I don't know if we will get one or not, but we likely will have to work harder to get one than most people who hunt the much more densely-populous black bear in parts of Alaska.

    I am going on an Alaskan brown bear hunt this September, because it's a great place to go. But there are a lot of great hunting and a lot of great hunters in the lower 48. Maybe you guys will correct me if I am wrong, but I can't imagine many Alaskan hunts much more demanding that some of the brutal elk hunts people go on in the Rockies (from New Mexico all the way up to Montana) near treeline hiking all day almost every day.

    It's easier to go on more-adventurous and challenging hunts more often in Alaska than elsewhere. But there is a lot of challenging and fun hunting in other states to be had if one decides to do it that way. Hunting largely can be what you make of it.

  18. #18
    Member akula682's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    1,187

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MarineHawk View Post
    Yeah, but we shoot back.

    Well if youíre the type that knows how to use a firearm, and is not afraid of it... you are a different species and are on the endangered list and canít be hunted.
    Josh
    Back in Afghanistan, I hope for the last time.

  19. #19
    Member Hoyt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Those that think Alaska's hunting seasons only last 3-4 wks need to get out more often. Sheep start on Aug 10th and moose season for me this year ends on Sept 25th. That's six weeks alone. Then I could head down to Kodiak and hunt deer from Aug 20th through sometime in December if I wanted. Many areas of the state have nearly year round caribou seasons and you can drive to one up the Haul Rd. I can hunt bears from mid-April through den up in October. Long seasons on wolves, coyotes, fox and other critters too. No upland birds to speak of, but enjoy hunting grouse with my kids. If you were a waterfowler it sure sounds like it's a few weeks of fun. Yes, it's more expensive and difficult to hunt up here, but it's worth it to me.

    I love Alaska. I love the whole package, even the cold weather. I like to trap when I get the time and ride snowmachines. I like to ride my ATV's, fish both salt and fresh, and hunt in the warmer months. It is also a good place to raise kids and has excellent economic opportunities.
    No upland birds? Not to be tooooo picky, but grouse and ptarmigan are upland birds. This state has 4-5 species of grouse and 2 species of ptarmigan. Thatís 5-6 different species of upland birds to hunt. We don't have pheasant or quail, but nowhere in the lower 48, can you get into Ruffie numbers (like those of the by-gone years in the Northeast) like Alaska. Alaska has great upland hunting, and beyond the normal practice of trail slaughtering, grouse can be a very challenging target once air bound (and a hoot when hunting with a dog)! So I hope this adds support to your already great post on why Alaska is fantastic!

  20. #20
    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,939

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akula682 View Post
    Well if youíre the type that knows how to use a firearm, and is not afraid of it... you are a different species and are on the endangered list and canít be hunted.
    Our Anchorage office almost shuts down during various times during the fall, as almost all the lawyers are out hunting.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •