Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 54

Thread: Jet Boating Tips/Advice

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    33

    Default Jet Boating Tips/Advice

    Just got my first jet boat its a 18ft alumacraft with a 115 mercury. Took it out for a short run for the first time today and i loved it. I know there is no substitute for experience and having someone with you who's been there done that, but any advice would be great. How to read the river and best ways to tell where the chanal is at those types of things. Thanks for any info!!

  2. #2
    Member skybust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    alaska
    Posts
    2,426

    Default

    High bank most of the time means deeper water

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    211

    Default

    The search button is your friend, there are a bunch of threads on here with good info. Remember, throttle means steering, no throttle no steering, always save 1/4 throttle to get out of bad situations.

  4. #4
    Member skybust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    alaska
    Posts
    2,426

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishslayer View Post
    The search button is your friend, there are a bunch of threads on here with good info. Remember, throttle means steering, no throttle no steering, always save 1/4 throttle to get out of bad situations.
    If in doubt throttle out

  5. #5

    Default

    Listen to Skybust in his posts above.. also, if you have the chance, run the rivers following someone to see how they take the channels, etc. It helps. Pack a dry bag in case you swamp your boat (thanks Mike) and get ready to get stuck - its a part of the learning process.
    "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kenai, AK
    Posts
    150

    Default

    All ears here. Thanks for starting this thread.

  7. #7
    Member Jimw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    453

    Default

    I started out following some one. Ask every and all questions, why did you go that way, what made you go this way. No gas no stearing. Practice in a lake to get the feel of how the boat drifts and feels when power is cut or just idealing. The current can be your friend or your enemy when putting in to the bank. (Dont ask how i learned that) More power is your friend when you have to do a slide job and then a point and shoot

    this will be year 6 for me and I'm still learning..... getting stuck happens
    2005 20' Weldcraft Sabre XL 350 MP
    SD309 AT
    2009 Polaris Dragon 800 163
    Custom Mod's

  8. #8
    Member Shum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Wasilla AK
    Posts
    30

    Default

    Coming from a non jet world when you hit something you kill everything, I found quickly in the jet world it is best to power through... Odds are you'll come out the other side. If you don't try your stuck anyhow so you might as well try...

    Prepare to be stuck, it happens, large linebacker sized friends are good to have when you are stuck.

    River current adds to your "bank speed" when going down and reduces your "bank speed" when heading up, meaning you enter a turn differently upstream vs downstream.

  9. #9
    Member jkb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,466

    Default

    The worst is a stretch with no high bank and the river widens out. It hard to know where to go. I planted a Jon boat dead center of the kantishna at just such a spot.

    On a slow moving river the flat water is often the most shallow if you can see circles of what looks like the water is boiling that's deep.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Great info keep it coming

  11. #11
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    Going up river is your friend, ( you can always back off) Down river you are stuck with your first choice.

    I took a guy out last year and let him drive the boat for his first time. Even though the river looked fine as to where he wanted to run, I kept him from running aground just because I knew said river. He asked me how I knew where to go, and I told him of the times that I had spent on this bar and that bar. ( and wished that there was a BAR that I could walk over too and get a drink. )

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Thanks for all the good info so far. I can't find any literature or websites with info on reading rivers. if Anybody has any sites or books I'd appreciate a link or even old threads would be good. Thanks again!

  13. #13

    Default River Runing

    This time of the year as the water is coming up you will find that there is a lot more trash in the water by that I mean sticks and logs ect. I have found over the years that during these times if it get to bad then I get in close to the bank and there appears to be less trash there. Some times I do mean close . Another thing about all of the trash is if you have had your boat tied up along the bank it will gather trash it is a good idea once you have moved out in the stream shut off the moter for a few seconds and if you had anything pulled against the grate it will give it a chance to drop off. Like others said live and learn as school goes on forever.Good luck

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,022

    Default

    What I learned about reading water I learned by fishing my whole life, that knowledge I apply to my jet boating skills. The most difficult water to read is when going downstream and those broad flat areas of "slow" moving water. Look ahead of where you are or, as I tell my wife when snowmachining, " look where you want to go, not where you are at".

    So always be looking well ahead of where you are and have a route planned before you get to the next bend. I am scanning the water and deciding on a route for as far as I can see at any given moment, especially when running a skinny river.

    Those broad, flat areas... look for current, or faster moving water relative to water around it, swirls and eddies are an indication of deeper water most of the time. There are a couple of places/rivers I run that have dead straight, broad and flat sections about a half mile long that would have many thinking they could shoot straight up the center, that tactic would leave them stuck and cursing. The channel snakes from one bank to the other and back again before the next bend and cut bank.

    Try to remember how you negotiated the river on the way up so that the return trip will be a bit easier ... remember, going downstream the water is more difficult to read and controlling the boat is as well.

    Do not hesitate... this took me a bit to learn. It is amazing how little water a jet boat can scoot through. If you think the water looks thin it probably is and you likely will zip right on through, if you see rocks poking up, well, something will hurt.

    If you have doubts, and this goes right along with the above, I take serious heed to a doubt when I run my boat. Usually I am in such a spot that the water is deep enough I can throttle back and go barge speed to get a good long look at what is ahead and make a decision or, if the water is too shallow to shut down and climb back on step, nail the throttle, spin it back the other way and get to a place to bank it or idle and scan the route.

    If you choose incorrectly on a route and see that you will get stuck (and this applies to silt bottom, not gravel) keep the throttle on and hit the kill switch when you ground it. Pulling the foot off to free a jammed motor gets tedious and time consuming.

    Put some time into learning throttle and boat response on a lake. Learn how to power slide, learn how to stop a slide. Put some weight in it and learn how long it takes to get on step in deep water, one thing you will notice when loaded heavy is that shallow water can/ may be how the boat gets on step as the water pressure beneath the hull wedges the boat up on step. I have left moose camp more than once loaded so heavy that I have to take a bit of a run upcurrent into some shallow water to gain plane and crank/slide turn it back downstream, it is quite noticable when traveling over the skinny spots just how much, or little water is beneath the hull.

    Be sure you have chest waders in the boat or better yet wear them ( I have never needed them when wearing them, funny how that works ).

    A shovel... it can be used as an anchor by stabbing into a soft river bottom to ease pulling the foot free of a jammed motor. It can also be used to dig a channel to that boat you just parked on the silt-bar and not least of all, it can be used to aid those calls of nature. I find the "construction spade" shortened with a handle on the end type convenient.

    A rope-a-long with 200' of rope is always in my boat and I have a 90' bowline to attach to. I have yet to need it but I have seen more than a few boats that could have used such a device. If you stick the boat hard aground and it is too heavy to be moved off by manpower alone, a rope-a-long is the ticket. I bought mine along with the correct rope at AIH. Also a great moose in the water removal tool .

    Some things I have learned in the 6 (I think) years of jetboating.

    Have fun, be safe and I hope this is useful.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kenai, AK
    Posts
    150

    Default How about a Z drag for getting unstuck?

    I'd use an "Alpine Butterfly" knot tied directly in the rope instead of a prussik but... Same concept. I've already got some lightweight mountaineering type pulleys, tubular webbing and carabieners. Anybody use this?

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi.../43/Z_drag.png

  16. #16
    Member jrogers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,539

    Default

    Be careful about following other boats to learn the river unless you know who they are. They may not know any more then you do. This is how I got stuck on the Deshka, following another boat. He didn't know where the channel was, and I followed him. He was lighter and smaller than me, and made it through when I got stuck. If following another boat that you don't know, pick one that is bigger and draws more water than you do.
    2009 Seawolf 31'
    www.seawolfmarine.com
    Fully Loaded

  17. #17
    Member jkb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,466

    Default

    +1 338wm good advice
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

  18. #18
    Member Crumm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    505

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    Be careful about following other boats to learn the river.
    The boat in front of you can also blow all the water out of skinny spots and leave you stuck. Stay a little farther back and the water will have time to flow back in but then the wake rebound off the bank makes it hard to read the water. I find it much easier to be in the lead.

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wyobohunter View Post
    I'd use an "Alpine Butterfly" knot tied directly in the rope instead of a prussik but... Same concept. I've already got some lightweight mountaineering type pulleys, tubular webbing and carabieners. Anybody use this?

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi.../43/Z_drag.png
    I have a similar set-up.. few weeks ago bear baiting I ran up a slough, lost water, and landed on a gravel bar in about 3" of water - UHMW or not, I was stuck and there were no trees within 400'. Luckily I was with another another boat and he had a chainsaw winch from AIH and one heck of an anchor. I added my 200' of Amsteel rope to the mix and it was less than 30 minutes before we were on our way (including walking time to set-up).

    I'm saving up for my winch from AIH now. The $800, IMO, is well worth the money and my back will live to fight another day.
    "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,892

    Default

    Is this were i say im sorry

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskanOutdoorsman View Post
    I have a similar set-up.. few weeks ago bear baiting I ran up a slough, lost water, and landed on a gravel bar in about 3" of water - UHMW or not, I was stuck and there were no trees within 400'. Luckily I was with another another boat and he had a chainsaw winch from AIH and one heck of an anchor. I added my 200' of Amsteel rope to the mix and it was less than 30 minutes before we were on our way (including walking time to set-up).

    I'm saving up for my winch from AIH now. The $800, IMO, is well worth the money and my back will live to fight another day.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •