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Thread: Beulah Switch

  1. #1
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    Default Beulah Switch

    Do many people have experience with these, and like them? I own the 7wt guide series, and love it, and I was thinking about building a 5/6 or 7/8 switch to get into spey. I know that its easier to learn on a real spey, but I just dont see myself getting any use out of a 13' rod here in SE. The 7/8 looks like a great rod to swing big flies to silvers and chums, but the 5/6 would be great for when I go to the kenai or for swinging sculpins to dollies around here. I could just go with the 6/7, but Im worried as to whether it would have the backbone for landing big silvers in brushy SE streams.
    Also, I know a heavy reel is needed for most switch rods, but is a Lamson Konic 3.5 heavy enough? I really dont want to spend too much on this, and a new reel would likely put me way over the top.
    Thanks for any help.

  2. #2

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    ak powder monkey should be able to answer your questions on this subject. akpm you listening to the good vibes.

  3. #3
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    The Beulah classic series are great, "true switch" rods...meaning their action lends itself well to both two-hand overhead and spey-family casts. The 7/8 is enough rod to deal with about every situation you might find.

    As for the reel, you don't "need" a heavy reel for a two handed rod - there is some slight benefit from a tip-light setup when casting, but otherwise, "balance" is a myth, and the balance point is altered with every foot of line out the tip. Balance while swinging is mainly for ease of hold, and is adjusted simply by moving your hand until you find the balance point of your rig.

    If you are interested in learning the spey family casts, stop by the fly shop (Juneau Fly Fishing Goods) and ask about the next available "introduction to switch and spey casting" class - you can teach yourself, but unless you have a good handle on loop and plane theory as well as single-hand casting physics, you can struggle for awhile or develop bad techniques that might take years to overcome.

  4. #4
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    my 5/6 is pretty sexy and is my go to Kenai rod.. The 7/8 my buddy has is also pretty sexy, sweet rod for swinging.. Have only thrown them with skandi lines though. I imagine they skagit well too.

    I'm not sure they are too useful for SEAK though. My 5/6 handles coho fine. So I'd imagine the 6/7 would too. Honestly I really wish I had a 13 foot 8 weight here for beach fishing kings...
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  5. #5

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    Lamson reel is plenty for the rod. I have the Lamson Velocity for my 7wt St. Croix switch and it balances it perfectly. Although balance doesn't make much difference in spey casting, it is a sweat single hand over head caster with a 7wt line. The longer rod also gives you a fish control advantage so I think the 6/7 would be enough for silvers. With long rods you really get to direct your fish.

    Riley

  6. #6
    Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    I hate a tip heavy rod, rear heavy is ok and neutral is great! Since switch rods have shorter uppper cork, it's sometimes hard to find the balance point if your reel is one extreme or the other on the weight scale. It also depends if the reels seat is up or down locking and the amount of line out. If the Konic is too light for your taste, just wrap a base layer of LC trolling line, lead tape or T-14 if your pocketbook allows. I have the Beulah 7/8 switcher and have used reels as heavy as a Speyco Symmetry Skagit G/P or Nautilus CCF 12 drag reel! Seeing your totals in your sig, I would go with a 5/6 or 6/7!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyatt View Post
    Seeing your totals in your sig, I would go with a 5/6 or 6/7!
    Believe me, thats only because its May. Once July rolls around, Im chasing chums and silvers 90% of the time.

    Though, their 4/5 would have its uses for June dollies...

  8. #8

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    Char:

    Take a look at the big TFO reels... I've got one and I also have a Lamson... I like the Lamson but the TFO reels are great and much more inexpensive.

    I started my spey casting last fall..... probably fished for steelies close to 90 days this last fall/winter/spring. Having plans for the Naknek last month I put together an 8wt switch so I could cast from a boat... broke's in newness in fishing the Bitterroot in March. I was using skagit spey casts fishing with "junk"... i.e. an indicator, some shot, a nymph and a smaller trailing nymph... a real potential for a not so fun day. Anyway, using a skagit double spey cast it was simply a delight to throw all that junk.... I subsequently built a 5wt for throwing junk (again with a skagit head) and am a FIRM BELIEVER that the spey casting is a much improved form of casting "junk" than traditional overhand casting...

    My point is... when you get that rod, jump into the spey casting learning curve and it's not something you want to try to learn from a book. It's complex....

    Best wishes,

    L

  9. #9

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    Mossy's Fly shop has Beulah switchers instock that you can look at.
    "The Tug is the Drug"

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by akgloomis View Post
    Mossy's Fly shop has Beulah switchers instock that you can look at.
    I might have to do that when come up in June.

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