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Thread: Boat plugs inside or outside

  1. #1
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
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    Question Boat plugs inside or outside

    On another thread about "stuff you forget" a guy mentioned reaching behind the boat to put the plugs in after he ran it on step to get the water out...

    SO ~~~~ when I was buying my new boat the salesman took me to a river and put the plugs in from the outside....I thought he was crazy and wrong, he said they always put them in that way.

    I've been putting my plugs in from the inside (PITA) thinking that if a plug came out I would still have it, and could put it in again. But, really, with the plugs outside, there is no pressure on them to make them come out, all the pressure pushes them in...or does it If being on step sucks the water out, could it suck a plug out if it wasn't real tight?

    What do you do? Inside plugger or outside???

  2. #2
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Inside

    With all the boats I have owned I have been and "inside" guy. I have never seen them done differently except on a Sea Sport with a tapped plug on the outside.

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  3. #3
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Default

    I am an inny, boat is an outie!

    I carry 2 spares.

    Mike

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    Default

    Outside here, also have a couple spares but never needed them.

  5. #5
    Member Maast's Avatar
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    Old 17 footer, outside - with the plug on a length of parachute cord tied to the motor mount so I cant loose it.

    New boat, outside but its a tapped plug - which is a bit of a PITA. I'd do another snap plug but I'm afraid that the threads will allow water past it.

    The tapped plug is also a smaller than the 17 footers opening.
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  6. #6
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Usage

    OK guys so let me ask this.

    When under way, for you outside guys, how do you remove the plug to drain the boat?

    With smaller skiffs and runabouts, we used to get up on plane, pull the plug and let the water drain out.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  7. #7
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Outside

    The floorboards and bilge pump in my Bay Runner make it very hard to get to the bung hole. So after having owned an Olympic with the bronze threaded plug removed from the outside, I decided to try it with the rubber tightening variety from the outside too. I have been doing it now for several years. No problems yet (fingers crossed).

  8. #8
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    OK guys so let me ask this.

    When under way, for you outside guys, how do you remove the plug to drain the boat?

    With smaller skiffs and runabouts, we used to get up on plane, pull the plug and let the water drain out.
    I am in the same boat as dirtofak.... Literally we have the same boat

    As far as draining it you just have to flip the switch on the helm and a little pump takes care of it for you. I am sure the bilge pump would clog if we used a cast net for bait like down in the south but for what we do I haven't had any problems.

  9. #9
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I am in the same boat as dirtofak.... Literally we have the same boat .
    Except mine is sexier.

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    As far as draining it you just have to flip the switch on the helm and a little pump takes care of it for you. I am sure the bilge pump would clog if we used a cast net for bait like down in the south but for what we do I haven't had any problems.
    What he said!

    Mike

  10. #10
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    On the inside always.

    To many things to knock them off when the plug is on the outside.
    Trees,gravel,nets and bunch of other junk floating around.

    Have cut floor board to be able to get to the drain plug and bilge pump.

  11. #11
    Member jkb's Avatar
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    My is an outy to much stuff to cut through from inside. If my bilge pump fails there's no other way to drain it though.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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  12. #12

    Default

    Good thread.........I never really thought about it till I was looking over our new boat (Custom Weld Storm) and realized what kind of contortions you have to do to get to the 2 drain plugs.

  13. #13
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Default

    On my trophy it is outside as it is a bronze threaded fitting and an I/O. I keep a couple of spares on hand and a handy wrench with a square hole that fits the plug.
    On my drift boat it is inside but it is on the bottom of the boat and that only makes sense.
    On my dads 20' Lund Alaskan we have always put it on the outside due to convience of reaching the plug area. We do keep a couple of extra plugs handy and use the screw tight type plugs vs the snap type.
    I have never had any problems associated with any of these configurations and the two bigger boats do have bilge pumps to take care of any water.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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  14. #14
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    Default Mine are inside

    I place the plug on the inside on all 4 of my boats. Several big inboards we have inserted them from the outside. On those normally there is a bit of a lip to protect the plug from getting snapped off if the boat backed into something.
    On all of my river boats there would be nothing to protect a plug if I slid over a log slowly, backed up, or drifted backwards down stream.
    In my smaller boats, all of the plugs, as mentioned by somebody else, are tied to the boat with a lanyard. That way I can't forget where I put them, and they are always in reach of the hole, especially when I launch and forget the plug.

  15. #15
    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Default

    I've done both. On the smaller skiffs without a bilge we use the inny approach so we can drain the boat. On my larger boats with bilges I've always put them on from the outside. Kind of interesting to consider though as if my bilge's go out on me I can't drain the boat. I also can't get to the drain plug without getting out and under the extended transom. Sure seems to make sense to put it on the inside so I could drain the boat in an emergency.

  16. #16
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    My preference is to install the plugs from the inside, but if that's not feasible (due to access, or whatever), then I install them from the outside. I make sure they are TIGHT, and I've never lost one.

  17. #17
    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    OK guys so let me ask this.

    When under way, for you outside guys, how do you remove the plug to drain the boat?

    With smaller skiffs and runabouts, we used to get up on plane, pull the plug and let the water drain out.
    +1! I was wondering the same thing.
    I may be slow, but I get where I'm going!

  18. #18
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    In my open jon boats I prefer the plug to the inside. With enclosed floors it would depend on access. The only time I ever lost a plug was in a 22' inboard Wooldridge. The inside plug was pushed out when backing into a muddy bank. What are the odds of that? The enclosed floor hid the problem until we tried to get on step and the water inside the transom was almost over the top.

    6 of one, half dozen of the other. The answer depends on the particular boat.

  19. #19
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    No plug is best

  20. #20
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Bilge

    If the bilge pump goes bad and the plug is outside or you can't get to it, you're out of luck. It has happened once to me.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
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