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Thread: Getting jiggy

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default Getting jiggy

    With all the discussion of jigs, I thought Id post up some pictures of the various jigs I use. First up lead heads, I mostly use 8-16 oz heads, but occasionally will find conditions that allow me to go lighter, or have to go the other way and drop a 24 oz to hold bottom.



    The jigs with stinger hooks have a 12/0 hook attached via 300# mono with crimps on the hook, run through the body, and then crimped on the eye of the jig.



    Im anxious to try these new monster shads that Boneyard baits came out with this year.




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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I really like all metal jigs, and here is a collection from 2 oz to 20 oz. As you’ll note, all treble hooks have been thrown in the trash and replaced with good single hooks. The only good thing I can say about treble hooks is they help you loose jigs to the rocks. I’ve mostly moved to the butterfly style of hook and just haven’t upgraded all the jigs.













    I'm a firm believer in having a good supply of jigs in various weights and colors, and if I'm not catching I quickly swap out jigs to try something different. More then likely if you aren't catching with jigs, there aren't fish around or they aren't biting. Adding a postage sized stamp bit of herring or Gulp never seems to hurt either.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    When you're running a jig with a single hook, you can make up a leader of 300# mono with an addtional hook and a small skirt or maybe a gulp pogy coming off the barrel swivel. I've made these in 18" and 24" length, though I can't say there has been a benefit from one length over the other.



    I've mainly moved away from these leaders beacause most of my jigs run two hooks, and that extra hook can be exceedingly dangerous when there isn't a fish on it, and the fish you've hook decides to dive while you are reaching for the leader. Somebody getting hooked just isn't worth the fish you might have caught. But, I have had instances where that extra hook with a small gulp pogy caught a rock fish before I even hit bottom with the jig.

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    Member sevenmag's Avatar
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    fantastic info on jigs. ty much paul

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    Default Leader with metal jigs?

    Paul what do you run for a leader when fishing the metal jigs in the med/small sizes?

    For instance, if your fishing with braid/spectra, say 100#....do you run a mono leader or use the lighter gagnion line?

    Something Iv'e been struggling with lately.

    Great pictures and post! Love it

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    Default Adding special attractant

    I found that buying the fuel absorbant pads cut in 6-8" vee strips added to the hook are a bonus. I keep a pan in the boat soaking several in Herring oil. The oil soaks into the fuel absorb material (water will not absorb) the material is white and will soak up alot of fish oil. That vee strip of oil soaked material adds an action and smell to the jigs that really works. There I go giving away my secret weapon

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The heaviest braid I use is 65#, I can't see any reason to go with heavier line, the larger line requires a heavier jig when fishing in a current, so is counter productive.

    I use 80# mono for 50-65# braid and 50# w/ 30-40# braid as a leader or top shot. A 8-12' length is all you need and has many advantages. You get a little bit of stretch to lessen the shock, mono is much more abrasion resistant than braid, and when the fish is at the boat you have a larger dia line to grab vs. getting your hand buzz sawed by braid. You can either attach the mono by melting a small ball on the end then tieing a nail not with about 20 wraps, or you can make up a wind on leader. I've even used uni-uni to connect the lines. At the end of the mono I use a 2/0 or 4/0 corkscrew swivel for quick changes of jigs.

    Don't let your line go slack when dropping the jig, most bites occur on the drop and if the line is slack, you won't feel the bump or be able to set the hook.

    PS, attractants can mess up the action of the all metal jigs, but are definately a good idea on lead heads.

    PPS, the 2-4 oz all metal jigs work very well for king and silver salmon.

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Don't let your line go slack when dropping the jig, most bites occur on the drop and if the line is slack, you won't feel the bump or be able to set the hook.
    I do on the metal jigs, especially the big Crocodile spoons. A limp line will allow them to flutter and provide a more enticing action. The fish usually hit 'em on the drop, so you feel them on the next jigging motion. Fish on!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan in Alaska View Post
    I do on the metal jigs, especially the big Crocodile spoons. A limp line will allow them to flutter and provide a more enticing action. The fish usually hit 'em on the drop, so you feel them on the next jigging motion. Fish on!

    Yep, some jig designs (butterflies) require a free-fall to perform their intended action...not an issue with the leadhead grub style. After a drop I stall before raising and this is when I get most of the fish...I just don`t let it lay on the bottom anymore due to the already noted fact that they (halibut) will lay on it if your into a school...which results in some snagged fish.

    Nice collection Paul.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I don't mean to retard the drop when jigging, each jig will require a different cadence depending on the jigs action and your rod. I've seen my kids drop a rod so fast that line is coiled on the water, and that is too fast.

    Here are some videos that show a vastly different cadence, and some nice fish.







    PS, those are my "A" list jigs, I've got a few more stashed in tackle boxes and in the garage.

  11. #11

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    Have you ever tried "floppers," as I hear them called in Puget Sound? Some of the best old time halibut fishermen use them (quietly) when dogfish are bad. Not useful in high currents, but when I've tried them up here, they are dy-no-mite.

    I've never seen them for sale, so you have to make your own. Use a 8-10" piece of 3/8" or 1/2" copper pipe, depending on the weight you want, and drill 1/8" holes at the mid-point, at the top-quarter and at the top. Put a cotter pin (ring out, of course) through the mid-point and quarter-point holes and plug the bottom with tin foil. Hold them upright with the bottom on something hard with pliers and pour them full of lead, then put a split ring in the top hole and on each of the cotter pins once it cools.

    The guys like them to make a dull thud on bottom rather than a metalic "tink" so they wrap them in duct tape, leaving the rings of the cotter pins exposed. Now put hoochies of your choice on two 7/0 or 8/0 siwash hooks and crimp them onto the mid-point and quarter-point split rings.

    To use these, you don't jig them up and down in the conventional sense. You need a stout, sensitive rod for the right feel, but the idea is to let them flop flat on bottom, then stand them upright without lifting them off bottom. (See why you can't use them in currents?) Get those hoochies waving and swimming right off bottom.

    I've had better luck with these on reluctant, slow-hitting halibut than any other kind of jig. Sounds crazy, but they'll make a serious believer out of you when they save the day. Can't beat the price either!!!

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    Wow! That's an impressive array of jigs. Where do you purchase those hooks with the red wraps on them?

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Some of the jigs came rigged with the assist hooks, others I got from B&J in Anchorage. It's been a few years since I've been to the K-bay gear shed in Homer, but I'd expect they'd carry them as well. You can get them on flea bay, and other on line sources.

    Speaking of flea bay, sometimes you can get some good deals on jigs in bulk. The butterfly jigs run $10-20+ ea, so when you find a 6 pack shipped to your door for $6 ea, it's worth getting one. http://cgi.ebay.com/speed-Knife-Jigs...item2a07175e42

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    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Sweet jig arsenal! That's all I gotta say about that.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

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    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
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    Default Jigs over bait anyday...

    And you've got a fine arsenal there, PH! I was going to ask where you found the great jig bags, then saw they were combo wrench bags...great idea, and sometimes those wrenches are cheap and worth buying just for the bag!

    Some of your jigs look homemade...like the 16 oz ones with "teardrop" sinkers for a head...could you tell us how you set them up? pre-made jigs are so expensive, and hard to find in Valdez.

    Also like the idea of the "flop" jigs (Thanks, Brownbear) and making my own, I've seen that several times on the forum and gotta try that. But, where do you get bulk lead, how do you melt it and are there toxic fumes to worry about?

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    Member oldmil007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cap'n Ron View Post
    And you've got a fine arsenal there, PH! I was going to ask where you found the great jig bags, then saw they were combo wrench bags...great idea, and sometimes those wrenches are cheap and worth buying just for the bag!

    Some of your jigs look homemade...like the 16 oz ones with "teardrop" sinkers for a head...could you tell us how you set them up? pre-made jigs are so expensive, and hard to find in Valdez.

    Also like the idea of the "flop" jigs (Thanks, Brownbear) and making my own, I've seen that several times on the forum and gotta try that. But, where do you get bulk lead, how do you melt it and are there toxic fumes to worry about?

    Give Ron an email. ron9616@aol.com

    He makes a lot of jigs for us here in the Gulf of Maine for groundfishing.




    As I recall he told me he likes using wheel weights, melts 'em outside on a gas grill in a steel pan. Probably would'nt be a bad idea to wear one of these :
    http://store.pksafety.net/asledu.html . Use them myself when grinding/repairing lead keels on boats.

    Another good source on making them yourself is Dennis Lavalley at lavjigs@yahoo.com

    Tell those guys that Oldmil said to call them. They'll either be real helpful or hang up immeadiately

    - Jay

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cap'n Ron View Post
    Also like the idea of the "flop" jigs (Thanks, Brownbear) and making my own, I've seen that several times on the forum and gotta try that. But, where do you get bulk lead, how do you melt it and are there toxic fumes to worry about?
    Always cast your lead outside and no prob with fumes. Just don't do it on a wet day, because a drop of water into a pot of molten lead is downright explosive, at least it seems so when the water turns instantly to steam and blows molten lead all over you.

    I scrounge lead when I can, but when I need some right away I hit the recycle operations. If you have an indoor range anywhere near, you've stuck gold. Ours sells the stuff in 5 gallon buckets for 10 cents a pound. And I'm here to tell you that a 5 gallon bucket weighs far more than 100 pounds. You lose about 10% as jackets and range dust, but it's dandy for jigs and weights.

    I got most of my molds from Do-It. Google them and you'll be amazed what they have available, and they're exceptionally well made for the price. You'll pay a whole lot more for custom molds of similar quality from other sources.

    On the filled pipe trick, here's a variation that will have you running back to the recycle center, if not buying new from a builder supply. Use the chrome plated pipe from bathroom installations to make your jigs. Cut the ends off at 45 degrees and drill a hole at each end for split rings. They're at least as effective as dart jigs you buy, and waaaaay cheaper.

    Can't find the chromed pipe? Use plain copper and spray paint it. Any color and combo you want that way, too.

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    On the pipe jigs, it ain't the color or shape or skirt that's working. When you fill a copper pipe with lead and put it in saltwater, you've created a battery of sorts, and that's what they're biting.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cap'n Ron View Post
    And you've got a fine arsenal there, PH! I was going to ask where you found the great jig bags, then saw they were combo wrench bags...great idea, and sometimes those wrenches are cheap and worth buying just for the bag!

    Some of your jigs look homemade...like the 16 oz ones with "teardrop" sinkers for a head...could you tell us how you set them up? pre-made jigs are so expensive, and hard to find in Valdez.

    Also like the idea of the "flop" jigs (Thanks, Brownbear) and making my own, I've seen that several times on the forum and gotta try that. But, where do you get bulk lead, how do you melt it and are there toxic fumes to worry about?
    A few years back I was in Moutain View Sporting Goods and saw they had a 16 oz hilts teardrop sinker mold clearence priced, I figured it'd work for slack water halibut bait rigs, and also figured I could modify it to make lead heads. I drilled through the eye portion of the mold to hold a hook shank, and used a dremel type tool to make a pocket to hold the eyelets. Boondocks had bags of old pre-circle hook long line 12/0 hooks fairly cheap, and so I was set. I had traded into several 5 gal buckets of wheelweights as I also cast bullets, so a decent supply of alloy.

    You can also cut the base of the jig to make a ~13 oz jig, but it's a real pita, so I've only cut a few of them. This dressing is way to delicate, but the lings seemed to like it.





    PS, regarding toxic fumes, so long as you don't get the lead super heated, you won't have issues with lead vapors. Melting down wheelweights, they are covered with dirt, grease, dog wizz and what else. Also there are valve stems that you'll end up getting in your melt. So do the work outside, wear a 1/2 face respirator and not really a big deal. I've cast at least 1000# of wheelweights and haven't had any issues with high lead levels. Just wash your hands afterwords and don't eat or smoke while handling lead.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    On the pipe jigs, it ain't the color or shape or skirt that's working. When you fill a copper pipe with lead and put it in saltwater, you've created a battery of sorts, and that's what they're biting.
    I thought about that, because I've sure seen the effectiveness of black boxes on salmon. If there was even a little electric current the dogfish would be all over it. But they ignore it completely.

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