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Thread: Fly Rod Setup for Grayling

  1. #1

    Default Fly Rod Setup for Grayling

    Any help on this subject would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member AlaskaIsCold's Avatar
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    For -just- Grayling I would say something like a 2-3wt would do it, since they don't get all that big and some dry flies, or nymphs.

    I'm not the expert though I rarely go after grayling.
    A bad day fishing is still better than a good day at work.

  3. #3

    Default midline or top of the line

    I have an echo 3 weight and a Sage 4 weight in Tlx. The echo is a 7.5' rod and the sage a 7' 10" rod. If you want to do creek fishing and that's it I would get a 3 weight in a short rod like 7' 6" and under. If you want to do lake fishing (longer casts) I would get a 4 weight in a longer rod like 8' 6" or more. The TLx casts real nice. It's my only sage rod wedding gift). I'm not for sure it's worth the money though. It's 3x more expensive than an Echo. Echo has a lifetime waranty along with Sage. If you want top of the line I would go Sage in the TLx series it does cast very nice, if you want mid-line I would go Echo or Temple Forks. Both have lifetime warantys and cast well for about 150. The sage is a 550 dollar rod.

  4. #4

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    Back in the year they first came out Howie at the Alaska Fly shop (Yeah, waaaaay back when) handed me demo outfits of the then-new Sage 0-, 1-, and 2-weights to try along with my 3- (8'3") and 4-weights (9 foot) in two long days of fishing on the China. I was after the biggest grayling I could find, and since it was late in the season, the big ones were downright smart.

    I looked kind of foolish packing five fly rods, but it sure gave me the right opportunity for comparison. Of the three demos, I ended up liking the 1-weight best, though it likely had more to do with how well it performed with that particular line. I formed the conclusion that those Sage lines SUCKED due to the tapers, and decided to wait for more lines to become available before passing final judgment the rods (and buying). Between my two rods, I preferred the 3 weight-wise, but was happiest with the 4 simply because it was a little longer. Ideal would have been a 9-foot 3 or maybe that 1-weight with a different line if I was going to use a shorter rod.

    I was fishing small dries almost exclusively, and doing some fairly complicated casting and line mending to reach smart fish in very tough spots. The biggest (and smartest) grayling would refuse flies with the slightest drag and often would rise up and follow right under the fly for a long ways looking it over and waiting for drag to start.

    My preference for the 3 I think was based as much on the line it wore as anything. I was using a Wulff Triangle taper, which is really tops for mending and line control, and if one had been available for the lighter Sages I would have liked them a lot better, I suspect. When I moved the line to the 4 (line was rated 3-4), that rod worked beautifully due to it's extra length along with the line, but it just felt "heavy" for fighting even the biggest grayling.

    If you're likely to get into smart fish and technical dry fly fishing, I'd strongly recommend a 9-foot 3-weight paired with the 3-4 Wulff Triangle Taper line. The few times I switched to streamers or heavy nymphs the line still handled them beautifully. With a conventional weight-forward line, I'm not sure you'd notice much difference between a 3 and a 4, because neither is going to mend well enough for fine drag control in tough fishing. Short rods are only going to make matters worse if you need to do serious mending, much less putting reaches or hooks into your casts.

  5. #5
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    For normal sized grayling in smaller creeks and ponds, 0-2wt rods in 6'-8' range. For bigger water, bigger flies, or bigger fish, a 3-4wt in 7.5'-9' should work fine. I you are fishing where you might hook into a large dolly or rainbow, I would go with a minimum of 4wt.

  6. #6

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    8'9 tfo 4wt pro series I think it is. Casts every bit as good as my spendy sage LL 3wt at 1/6th the price tag.

    Dont need much for a reel, something to hold line is about it.

    A quality fly line (dont go cheap here you'll regret it) Like BB I also bump up a line weight, 3wt rod 4 wt line
    some backing
    a leader
    some tippet material (5x is my go to, I do carry 6-8x)'
    and flies, which has been convered in great detail recently.

    I have a 0 wt, though rarely use it. U need to land fish quick to prevent killing them!!! Difference between being a purist and a preservationist. I love to fish and I love to go back and catch more fish later on, not find dead fish due to poor handling!!!

  7. #7

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    It depends on where you are fishing for grayling. I have had times where my 7'10" 3/4 seemed a little underweight for the fish I was catching. I had very little control over them in fast currents and lots of boulders. I switched over to my 8'6" 4wt and did just fine. If you aren't going to be fishing small streams, do not buy a short rod. Much less fish control and more difficult to cast. I think a 9' 3wt would be sweet for grayling.

    For lines, go with a Triangle Taper or a Steelhead taper WF line in the same weight as your rod is. Reels are less important, but if you want a really good reel for a lower price then get a Lamson Konic.

    Riley

  8. #8
    Member JediMasterSalmonSlayer's Avatar
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    Default Agreed...

    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    8'9 tfo 4wt pro series I think it is. Casts every bit as good as my spendy sage LL 3wt at 1/6th the price tag.

    Dont need much for a reel, something to hold line is about it.

    A quality fly line (dont go cheap here you'll regret it) Like BB I also bump up a line weight, 3wt rod 4 wt line
    some backing
    a leader
    some tippet material (5x is my go to, I do carry 6-8x)'
    and flies, which has been convered in great detail recently.

    I have a 0 wt, though rarely use it. U need to land fish quick to prevent killing them!!! Difference between being a purist and a preservationist. I love to fish and I love to go back and catch more fish later on, not find dead fish due to poor handling!!!

    I concur...
    http://www.myfishingpictures.com/watermark.php?file=133776
    Jedi Salmon Powers Activated!
    www.alaskansalmonslayers.com


  9. #9
    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JediMasterSalmonSlayer View Post
    I concur...
    I don't know....I had a Clearwater Grayling break my 5 weight once...

    I still need to send that rod in...

    Fish On!
    You know your not catching any fish when you start talking about the weather...


    http://www.alaskansalmonslayers.com/

  10. #10
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Light smooth and sexy, like bamboo or glass
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  11. #11

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    apm, my plan is a 4wt bamboo rod....maybe later this summer just for grayling. Got some of the stuff, need a little more.

  12. #12

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    Bc,

    Rookie ha! :P

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    apm, my plan is a 4wt bamboo rod....maybe later this summer just for grayling. Got some of the stuff, need a little more.
    Excellent choice. I'd take a hard look at the Wulff Triangle Taper for that rod. Much better than a standard double taper, and you WILL NOT like a weight forward line on bamboo, or at least I don't. They aren't fast enough to get the line speed you really need for a WF to do its work.

    BTW- If you can locate an original Powell Hexagraph, snag it immediately. I've got a couple and they're honestly better than any bamboo I've owned or tried. Same great feel but smoother and lighter. They haven't been made in years, but they're a score if you can find one on the used market.

    Edit--- Powell evidently spun off the company or technology. I just Googled hexagraph and came up with the Hexagraph Fly Rod Company. Looks and sounds like the same great rod, but probably a whole lot more available than the originals.

  14. #14

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    BB, do you know if they are hollow built? I think powell ground the inside flat and laminated cedar before tapering the strips, and then ground out hollows leaving dams every so often.

    I've got plans for a hollowing jig. Figured I'd hollow the butt section as the tip section is going to be to small diameter to mess with. I need to hook up with Chris C. if I can ever get to anchorage anytime soon.

    thanks for the advice on lines. I've got one bb rod, have never used it. Dunno what's possessing me to build them other then it sounds like a heckuva lot of fun (and work lol). Like I said I have most of the jigs needed, need some tools yet. Saving up money for a move in July (moving the fiancee up), after that it's build on. So hopefully I'll have one built before things ice up.

  15. #15

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    I've got a couple of Powell's hollowed cane rods, but no, these are completely different.

    The site I linked shows a cross section. They're actually foam-filled graphite, but you'll never know it to look at them, or especially to cast them. Powell's original versions were used for the casting in A River Runs Through It, if you need a demo of their capabilities. I love cane and have quite a bit, but once I got the Hexagraphs from Walt, my cane rods became wall hangers. I'll buy more Hexagraphs now that I found the company, but any future cane rods I buy will have to be cheap and expect a life on the wall. In my book, cane is for looking and Hexagraphs are for fishing. Not really, but I'll certainly push a Hexagraph a lot harder than I will cane.

  16. #16
    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    Bc,

    Rookie ha! :P


    Oooh...them are fightin words...

    What a fluke!

    Fish On!
    You know your not catching any fish when you start talking about the weather...


    http://www.alaskansalmonslayers.com/

  17. #17

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    lol haha! Sorry man, couldnt resist.

  18. #18

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    BB, I have to much invested at this point NOT to build atleast a few bamboo rods. The tapering forms are NOT cheap LOL! Most of the other jigs are home built.

    Those are neat looking rods, foam fill graphite, I'll admit I didnt look, was at work when I posted and didnt have much time surf.

    Not all bamboo rods are hollow....actually I dont think many are until more recent time though hollow rods in bamboo have been around awhile.

    I'd love a new graphite rod and I may have to buy one down the road for salmon should my current go to rods break. For grayling and atleast smaller trout, I plan on doing it with bamboo.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    BB, I have to much invested at this point NOT to build atleast a few bamboo rods. The tapering forms are NOT cheap LOL! Most of the other jigs are home built.

    Those are neat looking rods, foam fill graphite, I'll admit I didnt look, was at work when I posted and didnt have much time surf.

    Not all bamboo rods are hollow....actually I dont think many are until more recent time though hollow rods in bamboo have been around awhile.

    I'd love a new graphite rod and I may have to buy one down the road for salmon should my current go to rods break. For grayling and atleast smaller trout, I plan on doing it with bamboo.
    Powell was the only one I know of who put out any kind of production on hollow rods, and it was just the butt section. It only resulted in about a 15% weight savings and put a whale of a lot more stress on your joints. I broke two and Walt cheerfully replaced them, but acknowledged the gluing difficulty.

    I'll send you an offline note about a guy I know on the Peninsula who used to make his own, down to finding a batch of original pre-war Tonkin cane. He worked out a finishing technique you need to know about if he has time to tell you about it (he's busy). He has (had) machined planing forms, the works. Machined his own ferrules from German silver, and if I recall correctly also machined his own reel seats and other accessories.

  20. #20

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    Got the email, thanks a ton!!!

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