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Thread: Eqipment? Is it important when hiring guide/charter

  1. #1

    Default Eqipment? Is it important when hiring guide/charter

    I decided to start a new thread about fishing equipment and hiring a guide/charter operator. How important to you is the fishing gear that the guide/charter uses in deciding whether or not you will book with them? Is high end gear important or is functional gear alright with you? I'm not asking whether or not the guide/charter will put you on fish I just want to know if what they use is important to you before you book?

  2. #2

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    The problem I see with the question you are asking is that the definition of "high end gear" is something that is totally arbitrary. If you mean "the most expensive" that doesn't necessarily preclude gear that is better than that "most expensive" stuff that many people might consider "high end". Or not. Everyone has their own definition of what "high end" is obviously. Since it's obvious you are referring to the Ugly Stik vs. Lamiglass (etc.) debate you have to realize that there are some very "high end" Ugly Stiks. So your choice of adjectives I'm afraid is highly subjective. Who is it that defines what "high end" is?

    But, I do think if you limited the discussion to just, "How important to you is the fishing gear that the guide/charter uses in deciding whether or not you will book with them?" it would be a very valid question to ask. I wouldn't ever book with someone that uses old broken rods and/or reels, has a beat up and broken down boat or just that I might deem "unprofessional" from what I can find about them on the web. If I want to find out about a guide or charter service the first thing I do is read what they have to say about themselves on their website. That speaks volumes about someone. Then I would call or email that person and have a "discussion" with them---there is nothing like actually having a "one on one" with the person you are going to trust to give you the best fishing experience of your life. Are they passionate about fishing? Are they going to load up the boat with people that you don't know so they can maximize their "take" for the day?

    And certainly ask them about the gear that they use. I like a particular brand of rod as we all know, but there is absolutely no reason not to fish with someone just because they don't use the most expensive gear going. If that's important to you then make that your first question to the charter operator and if they don't give you an answer that you're happy with just give them a polite, "OK, but no thanks!" and leave it at that. If someone doesn't like my particular choice of gear I'll happily let them go to someone that stocks their boat with the most expensive stuff. I doubt I'd have a good time fishing with them, and to me the fishing experience is where it's all at. I provide "high end" fishing for my clients with what I consider "high end" gear. If you don't like my definition of "high end" please call anyone but me. Thanks!
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

  3. #3

    Default Yes

    Yes, gear is important when I'm spending money. I know good stuff and I know the stuff that is good enough. It's subjective but I don't want to be in a boat powered by a Tohatsu, I want a guy with a Yamaha. Likewise with rods, give me a GLoomis and not a $40 Okuma.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by penguin View Post
    Yes, gear is important when I'm spending money. I know good stuff and I know the stuff that is good enough. It's subjective but I don't want to be in a boat powered by a Tohatsu, I want a guy with a Yamaha. Likewise with rods, give me a GLoomis and not a $40 Okuma.
    That's a pretty good example of just what I was saying. I have twin Yamahas on my boat. When I got Yamahas years ago someone said to me, "I can't believe you got Yamahas! Didn't you know Hondas are much better!?" I've used Yamahas on two boats now and I love them. I sure would hate to lose a client because they don't consider Yamaha to be "high end".

    I don't use $40 Okumas so I can't speak to their quality, but I do know that Okuma makes some very good equipment. And I do know they make rods that cost a lot more than $40. I think if someone told me they only use Silstar "specials" that you can get at Walmart for $19.95 each I might wonder about the pictures they have on their website of the fish they have caught. So I'd certainly ask them about that.

    So once again you can see how subjective that aspect of this part of your question is tcman. I'll bet there are quite a few people out their that might consider a $40 Okuma to be "high end" and I sure won't put that person down because of that opinion. To each their own. One person's meat is another man's poison. Uhhhh, I'm sure I'm missing a few cliches there, but those make my point.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

  5. #5
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    Yes. Quality equipment is a extremely important when choosing a potential charter service.

    How long they have been guiding, referrals, and there reputation as far as "personality & attitude" are a couple of other things that would be important to find out as well.

  6. #6
    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    Knowing I was on a charter for salmon last year and broke a St.Croix rod that cost me a very large king ,,, yeah quality has some play in my future decision..

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    While the quality of the equipment is important, what is more important is it's condition. You can have a boat with high end gear on it that has damaged guides, non-functioning level winds, flashers and lures in a jumbled mess and a dirty boat. But in the same token you can have a boat with lower priced equipment that is properly taken care of that works properly and a clean well organized boat.
    What boat would you rather be on?

  8. #8

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    Quality and maintenance of gear is a good sign about the rest of a guy's operation. If you see problems with the gear, guess what?

  9. #9

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    I've been on a dozen or so guided/charter fishing trips (all in Alaska, I'm proud to say). What's important to me is good rugged, servicable equipment matched to the type of fishing I'm doing. The brand name or the price doesn't impress me much. In fact I can't tell you now the brand name of any rod I've used while fishing guided. I always check out my guides ahead of time, and am confident in their choices of equipment.

    As a client I don't need a guide all worried about me abusing his high dollar signature series/limited edition rod either. That's not fun for either of us.

    Probably the most important item would be quality fresh line. Nothing ruins a fishing trip faster than old worn out line. Any guide worth anything knows that too. On my own reels I will put fresh line on two or three times per season. Cheap insurance IMO.

    Eel

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