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Thread: Fishing Line in relation to kings.

  1. #1
    Member AlaskaIsCold's Avatar
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    Default Fishing Line in relation to kings.

    So I was talking to a few people as I was putting on my waiters, despite the fact that we were going fishing for trout and grayling the chat turned toward that of king salmon.

    King salmon in some rivers are bigger than others. a King on the kenai is most likely going to be bigger than a king in Ship creek. But I was wondering what kind of line is useful for what rivers. I'm thinking about trying 15lb Florocarbon tippet in the willow creek area. But i'm wondering if that is too weak of a line to be using.

    So yes lets make this a discussion! what kind of lines do you use on what rivers? Do you find yourself using lighter line and playing the fish more or do you find yourself using heavier line and muscling it in?
    A bad day fishing is still better than a good day at work.

  2. #2
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    I tend to use a heavier line when fishing from the shore in combat situations. I usually will use 40lb test on the Parks streams, and I haven't had any problems.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaIsCold View Post
    So I was talking to a few people as I was putting on my waiters, despite the fact that we were going fishing for trout and grayling the chat turned toward that of king salmon.
    Just wondering there AlaskaIsCold, how do you wear "waiters" (as opposed to "waders")??

    Sorry I could not resist!!

    ClearCreek

  4. #4

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    I'll be using 15 pound tippet on my fly rod.... about the only way you can break it off is to point the rod at the fish, as long as you have good knots. With the rod held up you will break the rod before it breaks.

    Somebody on this forum may disagree but tie your line to your bumper, put out 40 yards of line and walk backward with your rod tip up at about sixty degrees and try to break your line. You'll be amazed what the line will take. Make sure you have the keys and not your wife...

    Rock abrasion etc is a different story.

    L

  5. #5
    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    You don't have to worry about them being line shy, so I say go heavy. I can still hear that 15# test snapping and sounding like a .22 being shot on a small but decent sized king at the Kasilof (100% operator error because I thumbed the spool).
    If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction.
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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaIsCold View Post
    I'm thinking about trying 15lb Florocarbon tippet in the willow creek area. But i'm wondering if that is too weak of a line to be using.
    Are you talking about a "tippet" for a fly line, or just a 15 lb. leader on your bait or spin caster? I assume you're talking about a leader since asking about fly fishing tippets might be a question you'd ask on the fly fishing forum.

    I personally wouldn't use anything less than at least a 30 lb. leader, and usually 40 lb., and especially in a "combat" sort of situation. The quicker you can get that fish out of the water the better off everyone is.

    But if I had my fly rod and a bunch of bank to work from I'd be willing to give a 15 lb. tippet a try. It would be a lot of work, but a lot of fun, too.

    And sorry for chuckling at this one, but I was wondering about the "waiters" thing too. I prefer my waiters to bring me the food and drink I ordered as quickly as possible and not bog me down when I'm fishing. Though it sure would be nice to have someone out there helping me when I reel one of those big ones in. They'd get a very generous tip!
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
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  7. #7
    Member JediMasterSalmonSlayer's Avatar
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    I have always used 25lb test mono and have yet to have any issues.

    I can put a lot more on my reel, compared to using a heavier line.

    Using the reel drag set and putting pressure on the fish at the right time I believe are more important than heavy line or braided type line.
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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by JediMasterSalmonSlayer View Post
    I can put a lot more on my reel, compared to using a heavier line.
    That's one of the main reasons I use 50 lb. braid. It is the same diameter as 15. lb mono so you can put a lot more of it on your reel than larger diameter mono.

    Probably one of the biggest advantages braid has over mono is braid has almost no stretch while some mono will stretch almost 20%. So if you have a bunch of line out there on a spool ripping run with a big king that mono is acting like a big rubber band while braid allows you complete "contact" with your fish while you're fighting it. So let's say you have 100 ft. of line out there, then it can stretch as much as 20 ft.

    And braid will also will give you a much better hook set. Just ask yourself whether you'd rather try to set the hook with a big long "rubber band" or a direct connection with your fish. I personally prefer the direct approach.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
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  9. #9
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    If you're talking tippet on the end of a fly line, just make sure it isn't stronger than your backing

    If you're fishing in a crowd or planning on releasing a fish you ought to fish heavier line and get them in quickly.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by scott_rn View Post
    If you're talking tippet on the end of a fly line, just make sure it isn't stronger than your backing

    If you're fishing in a crowd or planning on releasing a fish you ought to fish heavier line and get them in quickly.
    More than that, consider that the cores of fly lines are either 20# or 30#, depending on the brand and line size.

    I have a hard time, as in nearly impossible, heaving on a 12-weight rod hard enough to break 16# tippet, and can't break 20# on a 12-weight. I can barely do it on a 14-weight. Good luck breaking either on a 10-weight, much less an 8 or 9.

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