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Thread: Halibut hooks set with jigs

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    Default Halibut hooks set with jigs

    This is the summer of the jig for me. I have a bunch of 16 and 24oz jig heads with 12/0 hooks and a bunch of Boneyard grub tails. My question is when you feel a fish do you hit them right away or let them take it a few seconds.

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    Member Larsenvega's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kgpcr View Post
    This is the summer of the jig for me. I have a bunch of 16 and 24oz jig heads with 12/0 hooks and a bunch of Boneyard grub tails. My question is when you feel a fish do you hit them right away or let them take it a few seconds.
    When you feel a fish, set the hook like you're trying to rip their lips off. Jigging is nothing like fishing with circle hooks. If you let a fish "taste" a jig, you've most likely lost the fish. I fish exclusively with jigs, and wouldn't have it any other way.

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    Default Set the hook~

    If you feel a bump YANK the hell out of it! If you miss it, return jig to strikezone. Deppending on where your fishing tides/depth you might try picking up a few lighter jigs. I really enjoy fishing with jigs and found that lighter gear all the way around is a blast!
    I try to keep jigs under 12Oz. This season my new weapon will be a Penn 330 LD with 50lb power pro line, attached to a Diawa jigging rod picked up at B&J's. I went with the lighter line to reduce drag during bigger tide changes. Now all I need is the time off!
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Also keep tension on the line when you have a fish on. Allot of fish you hook will come off. This is just the nature of the beast when it comes to jigging.
    Allot of times they will strike when the jig is down side side. What I mean by down side is when you left the jig and the you lower you pole the jig heads back to the bottom.
    You got Bone yard jigs. That is the ticket. Get ready for allot of fun and fast action.
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    Gary Keller
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Gray View Post
    Also keep tension on the line when you have a fish on. Allot of fish you hook will come off. This is just the nature of the beast when it comes to jigging.
    Lead heads will fall out of a halibut's mouth faster than you can blink if you give them any slack. don't know why, but especially if you give them slack when pumping a fish up, you'll be reeling up and empty hook. Shorten your lifting stroke, and don't drop the rod tip till you're already reeling.

    And sharpen those hooks! If they're not sharp enough to scratch your thumbnail with light pressure, they're not sharp.


    An awful lot of your strikes with grubs will come while your rod is down at the bottom of your jigging motion with the jig head resting on bottom. You won't even feel a hit, rather it just won't move when you start to lift it. BANG it! HARD, and as fast as you can do it.

    And 16 -24's are really heavy unless you've got lots of depth and current. You need a really stout rod to jig them right. Your typical roller-tip "halibut" rod isn't stiff enough for that heavy a jig. The rod doesn't have to be "heavy," but it does need to be lots stiffer, and the stiffer the better. I'd pick up some 12's, 8's and 4's, too.

    My favorite jig rod is the Okuma Speed Jig for around $120, but Penn has brought out a new one that looks at least as good without having fished one yet. Both are really light weight, but 6-6.5' and really stiff. Ideal.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Sometimes when you jig hits the bottom, halibut will swim right on top of it. So next time you lift you rod you foul hook them. Allot of times you can tell right away you fouled hooked one and just give it slack and they will go free!
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Sometimes on grubs you'll get a short strike and the hook set results in no fish on, but teeth marks on the tail. Lings seem to be notorious for this. Thus running a stinger hook has merrits.

    I don't consciously give a monster hook set, fish seem to hit jigs pretty hard, so my reaction is a good jerk on the pole and fish on.

    I've had problems with halibut laying on jigs, seems to happen when there is a school of them and they're trying to hide their find from other buts. A foul hook fish feels alot bigger than it is, and you don't that famous but headshake.

    I don't mind jigging 16 oz jigs, but 12's and 8's are alot more pleasent to run, and are typically more than enough for most situations. 24's are a speciality item, good to a have a couple of them, but not the first thing to start jigging.

    Also don't forget the all metal jigs, the butterfly style jigs work very well, as well as point wilson darts, cripled herring, diamond jigs etc.

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    Sometimes the fish will hit only when the jig is still. You can time when they will hit it after you are done with your motions. Sometimes they hit precisely a second or two after it stops and if you can get that down when you think he's gonna hit it, WHAM. It works from time to time.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    When the current is strong I have sent a jig down and relled up a couple feet from the bottom and just left it there. I have caught some really nice butts this way.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Yeah. Get that old tail to swimming just off bottom, and nice things can happen.

    Long as we're swapping stunts, here's a dandy. I put the jig 3' below a 3-way swivel, then put a firecracker herring with a fair bit of curl on a 2' mooching rig on the extra leg of the 3-way. More than a few kings have snacked on that herring while I was waiting for halibut.

  11. #11

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    I do the opposite of most when it comes to jigging for 'buts..

    First off, jigging is the greatest thing in the world to keep from reeling up small halibut.

    If you are going to give a slam hook set with every tap you feel, you are going to foul hook a lot of small halibut, who can't even get the jig in their mouths anyway. IMO, that is not an ethical way to fish. You damage a lot of young halibut, unnecessarily.

    I've never caught a big fish on a jig that didn't eat the jig. One big gulp. (usually on the drop is when they hit)

    So.. I drop the jig to the bottom. I reel it up ten feet. I drop it again. Reel it up 10 feet, drop it again. Repeat again and again in your drifts. I'll feel all sorts of small fish slapping the jig. I DON'T set the hook, until I feel a halibut has eaten the jig, not just grabbed it from the side. A fish eating the jig feels completely different than a smaller halibut grabbing the jighead or the side of the jig and shaking it. It takes a 20lb+ halibut to get a good sized jig in it's mouth. Ling and Yellow have big mouths, and they easily eat it.

    I view that technique as win/win. I don't have to reel up scores of small halibut from deep water just to release, I can keep my jig down at the bottom increasing your chances at a bigger 'but, and the small halibut don't get their eyes hooked.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    I do the opposite of most when it comes to jigging for 'buts..

    First off, jigging is the greatest thing in the world to keep from reeling up small halibut.

    If you are going to give a slam hook set with every tap you feel, you are going to foul hook a lot of small halibut, who can't even get the jig in their mouths anyway. IMO, that is not an ethical way to fish. You damage a lot of young halibut, unnecessarily.

    I've never caught a big fish on a jig that didn't eat the jig. One big gulp. (usually on the drop is when they hit)

    So.. I drop the jig to the bottom. I reel it up ten feet. I drop it again. Reel it up 10 feet, drop it again. Repeat again and again in your drifts. I'll feel all sorts of small fish slapping the jig. I DON'T set the hook, until I feel a halibut has eaten the jig, not just grabbed it from the side. A fish eating the jig feels completely different than a smaller halibut grabbing the jighead or the side of the jig and shaking it. It takes a 20lb+ halibut to get a good sized jig in it's mouth. Ling and Yellow have big mouths, and they easily eat it.

    I view that technique as win/win. I don't have to reel up scores of small halibut from deep water just to release, I can keep my jig down at the bottom increasing your chances at a bigger 'but, and the small halibut don't get their eyes hooked.
    Don't be throwing rocks now. If you go back and read, I said stops, not taps. Big difference, and I don't bother with the taps either- usually as it's falling. I can't remember the last time I snagged a halibut.

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    When you jig for halibut, do you use scent or strips of herring or salmon bellies trailing on the hook? In 70-80 feet of water, is there a favorite color. Also, does UV liquid increase strikes?

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishinglonsalmon View Post
    When you jig for halibut, do you use scent or strips of herring or salmon bellies trailing on the hook? In 70-80 feet of water, is there a favorite color. Also, does UV liquid increase strikes?
    Yes I have done that in the past. Spray it with herrinng oil.
    As far as color
    halibut- white with a blue or red tail, soild white, chartruse.
    Lings- I like darker colors black, cinnamon with flakes. But the above jigs colors for halibut work great to.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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