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Thread: Hooligan Oil

  1. #1
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    Default Hooligan Oil

    The "Hooligan Crew" will be hitting the Susitna over Memorial Weekend and plan on loading up on hooligan...

    i'm really interested in rendering the oil in the tradition of the natives of the southeast and pacific northwest.

    but i'm guessing that fermenting hooligan in a pit in my backyard for a week is not going to make me popular with the neighbors...

    has anyone rendered the oil in a home process?
    are there shortcuts to the fermenting process?

    thanks for any help...

    cig

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    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Excellent question. I've thought about that, too.

    I bet it would be great for soaking or injecting into other baits.

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    I'm curious to see what others say about how it's done in a traditional manner.

    For high effieiency, I'm thinking that you'd need to press and/or centrifuge the liquids out...then separate the oil. Perhaps boiling/steeping them whole and in water and then skimming the oil off is simplest the way to go...you'd still be able to freeze and use the rest for shrimp bait/chum bag to maximize the utilization. I'd hate to see waste...

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    coho... i bet you're right :-)
    mrfish...great suggestions...thanks,

    as for traditional methods...here's some info i came across.

    i particularly like how they cooked the hooligan in dugout canoes with hot rocks... and the oil waterproofed the vessel.

    http://www.subsistence.adfg.state.ak...hPap/tp213.pdf

    http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/Smelt.htm

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    Default And that's how they did it...

    Quote Originally Posted by cigarro View Post
    coho... i bet you're right :-)
    mrfish...great suggestions...thanks,

    as for traditional methods...here's some info i came across.

    i particularly like how they cooked the hooligan in dugout canoes with hot rocks... and the oil waterproofed the vessel.

    http://www.subsistence.adfg.state.ak...hPap/tp213.pdf

    http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/Smelt.htm
    ... no fermentation necessary; just heat rendering... which is still bound to be a very aromatic process.

    When I lived in Sitka many years ago they called it "gleena" or something along that line.

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    thanks sayak...i'm going to give it a try.

  7. #7

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    I realize that this thread is an oldie but hoping some new info has come along and folks have gained experience since the thread was started. I too am interested in producing oil from the hooligan to use for various uses including ingestion. Since I have read several references that stated that oil extraction through fermentation creates a very aromatic product, I too am looking for producing the oil without fermentation. Does anyone have any personal knowledge on this subject? A friend who grew up out on the Yukon delta said to just heat the fish in hot water for a while and let it cool. The resulting oil will collect and harden on top as the the water cools. I will give something similar a try if no one else has any insight here.

    Thanks

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    Hi Mountain Joe,

    I was all over this a little while ago myself. There is no specific information about it. I contacted elders from my village in Hydaburg, all the way to Canada and the only thing I could get was to bury it for 7-14 days, boil it, breaking the fish up while it boils. Do this for about 2 hours. To kill bacteria, specifically botulism which is usually what happens with fermented fish, you have to boil it for 30 minutes at 240-250. The old timers typically boiled the oil for about 4 hours.

    From there they would skim the oil off the top and filter it about 4 times to remove any particulates. Store it in a glass bottle and put the excess in the freezer, one jar in the fridge. I'm digging my hole to bury mine now.

    To get the maximum health benefits from it, you do need to ferment it. Fermentation increases the absorption of EFA's 3,6,7,9 as well as increases the amount of A,D,E, and K found in the oil along with DHA. If you do a light ferment of 7 days (which is my favorite) it doesn't taste fishy at all. It's very mellow. If you are using this as a supplement, mix it with high vitamin pasture butter and some essential oil of cinnamon. That's what I do in my house. You mix 2/3 oil to 1/3 pasture butter and cinnamon oil to taste. The two work extremely well together and even remineralize teeth and bones. Dr. Weston Price is the one who figured that out.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    There's some great information on this topic at this link: http://www.nativeknowledge.org/db/files/tp213.htm

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    Thanks much for the info. Very informative.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by southeastgirl View Post
    Hi Mountain Joe,

    .........I contacted elders from my village in Hydaburg, all the way to Canada.........
    Thank you SouthEastGirl for this very informative post. I did not want to ferment the oil but after receiving this very informative in depth info I will at least record it for future if not use it now. In my searching of the web I did not find out near this much info. Thank you again. The Siberians traditionally made a mosquito repellent using about half fish oil and half birch bark oil. It would be my guess that this very well may be the fish oil that they used. I have used the birch bark oil straight and it proved to not be effective in the least as a repellent so the addition of the fish oil must be key.

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    Interesting about the mosquito repellent. I've heard about the birch oil but never the fish oil with it. I make one out of castor oil with water and essential oils and it works great! I've tried others with just dried herbs, skin so soft, old
    spice, blah, blah, blah. Nothing seems to work as good as the essential oils or deet for my house. Let me
    know how your experiment works.

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    I did forget to mention to not boil the fish, but keep the heat low to prevent froth. I did not do that and for one large white cooler of hooligan, I only got about 3 quarts of oil. I was skimming a lot of froth off the top and wondering about how much oil I was wasting. I went into this article I had seen about the Bella Coola natives and how they fermented their fish. While I reread the article, they did not ferment only for health, they also did it to get the maximum amount of oil out of the fish.

    https://www.mcgill.ca/cine/files/cin..._2_154-161.pdf

    Nowadays, we can't stand the smell of anything fermented, so we refine it. They use bleach, lye, charcoal, and other additives to make it tasteless and odorless for your repellent. I would say after all the work I went through for a little grease....I'm going to not complain about paying $50 a quart anymore, lol!

    http://www.inspirefood.dk/-/media/Si...ils.ashx?la=da

  14. #14

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    There are wild plants here in Alaska that do work fairly well but require frequent re-application same as the essential oils and olive oil. Labrador tea or Hudson bay tea leaves, wild geranium leaves, wormwood leaves and red elderberry leaves all work as a mosquito repellent. Each of those plants work better and last longer if cooked in olive oil. In a survival situation just rubbing the leaves in between the hands to help break them up, and then rubbing on exposed skin will help but needs very frequent re-application. I do not know when I will get around to trying out the birch bark/ fish oil combo but when I do I will try and remember to let you know how it works. Thank you again for the helpful traditional oil extraction method info.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountain joe View Post
    Thank you SouthEastGirl for this very informative post. I did not want to ferment the oil but after receiving this very informative in depth info I will at least record it for future if not use it now. In my searching of the web I did not find out near this much info. Thank you again. The Siberians traditionally made a mosquito repellent using about half fish oil and half birch bark oil. It would be my guess that this very well may be the fish oil that they used. I have used the birch bark oil straight and it proved to not be effective in the least as a repellent so the addition of the fish oil must be key.
    Is this an insect repellant or a "bug" repellant? I think anyone bugging you would be repelled by this...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by southeastgirl View Post
    Hi Mountain Joe,

    I was all over this a little while ago myself. There is no specific information about it. I contacted elders from my village in Hydaburg, all the way to Canada and the only thing I could get was to bury it for 7-14 days, boil it, breaking the fish up while it boils. Do this for about 2 hours. To kill bacteria, specifically botulism which is usually what happens with fermented fish, you have to boil it for 30 minutes at 240-250. The old timers typically boiled the oil for about 4 hours.

    From there they would skim the oil off the top and filter it about 4 times to remove any particulates. Store it in a glass bottle and put the excess in the freezer, one jar in the fridge. I'm digging my hole to bury mine now.

    To get the maximum health benefits from it, you do need to ferment it. Fermentation increases the absorption of EFA's 3,6,7,9 as well as increases the amount of A,D,E, and K found in the oil along with DHA. If you do a light ferment of 7 days (which is my favorite) it doesn't taste fishy at all. It's very mellow. If you are using this as a supplement, mix it with high vitamin pasture butter and some essential oil of cinnamon. That's what I do in my house. You mix 2/3 oil to 1/3 pasture butter and cinnamon oil to taste. The two work extremely well together and even remineralize teeth and bones. Dr. Weston Price is the one who figured that out.
    Botulism is a problem with modern methods: don't bury in plastic, anaerobic ferment, or "without air," will take place. Use breathable containers, like clay pots or bark pots. This allows aerobic ferment, which means "with air." Aerobic fermentation keeps the botulism organisms from growing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountain joe View Post
    There are wild plants here in Alaska that do work fairly well but require frequent re-application same as the essential oils and olive oil. Labrador tea or Hudson bay tea leaves, wild geranium leaves, wormwood leaves and red elderberry leaves all work as a mosquito repellent. Each of those plants work better and last longer if cooked in olive oil. In a survival situation just rubbing the leaves in between the hands to help break them up, and then rubbing on exposed skin will help but needs very frequent re-application. I do not know when I will get around to trying out the birch bark/ fish oil combo but when I do I will try and remember to let you know how it works. Thank you again for the helpful traditional oil extraction method info.
    Interesting. I have good luck with the castor oil, EO of tea tree, rosemary, citronella, eucalyptus.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    Botulism is a problem with modern methods: don't bury in plastic, anaerobic ferment, or "without air," will take place. Use breathable containers, like clay pots or bark pots. This allows aerobic ferment, which means "with air." Aerobic fermentation keeps the botulism organisms from growing.
    Not really just a modern problem. Typically to keep the insects away as best we could we would dig a hole and line it with tree branches, grass, or skunk cabbage leaves. Sometimes we got botulism, sometimes we didn't. My great aunt was one of the last ones I know of brave enough to try stink heads prepared the traditional way. That was the last thing she ever did. These have always been known in the villages as a "Russian Roulette" style food.

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