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Thread: "River Etiquette"

  1. #1
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
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    Default "River Etiquette"

    Just stumbled across this article while researching an upcoming trip to Northern Cal. Though most of us exhibit good beahavior already, it never hurts to have a refresher.

    I like the author's practice of doubling the downstream angler's casting distance to give ample room and not spook his fish.


    http://www.theflyshop.com/adventures/vise8.htm

  2. #2
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    That article needs to be printed on every launch and campground in South Central.....

    Good stuff.

    Rep if I can.
    ďLife has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.Ē ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  3. #3
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    They need that at every corner of every river in the interior as well. Too many "ME" folks ruining everyone else's fun some days. But there a lot of nice folks too.. argh. )

  4. #4
    Member LItoAK's Avatar
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    I especially like the first paragraph about putting your boat in the water. It seams that lots of people like lingering around the launch. I like pulling off to the side before the launch and setting up every thing i.e. fly rods, oars, anchor life jackets ect.

    The double the distance of the cast is nice also. thanks for the post.

  5. #5
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    It was a great read. It is called a boat launch, not boat prep area. I have "asked" more than one person to launch please and set their gear up off to the side or on the first gravel bar. I have gotten many responses as you can imagine. I usually let my wife "explain" to them how things are supposed to work.
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

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    While fishing the Situk a couple weeks back a drift boat guide showed some of the best river etiquette Iíve seen in some time. The 4 of us got out of are drift boat and were casting across the river at holding fish, I hooked up as he came around the corner with the steelhead going crazy, the guide pulled over got out of his boat and walk it passed us not in front where we were fighting fish and casting but behind us between the bank and were we were wading so not to spook the fish. Itís a small river compared to the Kenai but with all the people fishing the Kenai theses days (it can make it even smaller) Good thread.

  7. #7

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    The boat launch etiquette that's consistently abused on the Upper Kenai is at the pullout at Jim's Landing. For some reason, it is standard practice for rafts to dismantle their raft/frame/gear directly in the boat ramp, thus leaving no room for other boats to land or for other trailers to back-in the boat ramp area to pull out their boat. Why breakdown your gear directly ON the boat ramp?

    Please move your raft out of the BOAT RAMP area and move it to the downriver area to breakdown your gear.

  8. #8
    Member AlpineEarl's Avatar
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    Good article, the FlyShop is a first rate place too. I've bought lots of stuff from them. The article is missing one thing though; Actions to take when no etiquette or common decency is present. Like how big of a rock to throw in a hole after the guide boat lets it clients get out and stand next to you to fish, and nobody else is within 200yds. What to do when the guy across from you on a crowded river insists on casting at your waders, even when you were there first. What to do when the guy upstream of you pukes because he is drunk and his puke drifts on to your waders (happened on the Anchor). What to do when somebody's dog tries to chase a fish you just hooked and jumps in the water and swims after it (happened on Montana creek).
    I'd like to see some more solutions to some common and not so common situations.

  9. #9
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaBarbless View Post
    The boat launch etiquette that's consistently abused on the Upper Kenai is at the pullout at Jim's Landing. For some reason, it is standard practice for rafts to dismantle their raft/frame/gear directly in the boat ramp, thus leaving no room for other boats to land or for other trailers to back-in the boat ramp area to pull out their boat. Why breakdown your gear directly ON the boat ramp?

    Please move your raft out of the BOAT RAMP area and move it to the downriver area to breakdown your gear.
    I could not agree more. I have a small 2 person cat. I float by the ramp and land. Unload my rods and cooler and gear. Then walk my boat over and back the truck down. Im usually not on the ramp more than 5 minutes.
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  10. #10

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    River etiquette is right up there with 4-wheeler etiquette. It's always someone else who does the damage.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlpineEarl View Post
    Good article, the FlyShop is a first rate place too. I've bought lots of stuff from them. The article is missing one thing though; Actions to take when no etiquette or common decency is present. Like how big of a rock to throw in a hole after the guide boat lets it clients get out and stand next to you to fish, and nobody else is within 200yds. What to do when the guy across from you on a crowded river insists on casting at your waders, even when you were there first. What to do when the guy upstream of you pukes because he is drunk and his puke drifts on to your waders (happened on the Anchor). What to do when somebody's dog tries to chase a fish you just hooked and jumps in the water and swims after it (happened on Montana creek).
    I'd like to see some more solutions to some common and not so common situations.
    Had something similar on the Kenai last year. Two friends and I were fishing just around a little bend and downstream from an area where people felt like they had to stand shoulder to shoulder. We were a good hundred yards from the group and no one was downstream of us. A guide came around the corner in a boat and I heard him tell his clients, "I like fishing here, lets go here." He maneuvered his boat over and nearly took one of my friends out with his boat. My friend literally had to jog out of the water to keep from being hit by the boat. The "guide" proceeded to get his clients out and had them start fishing right where my buddy was standing. He didn't even acknowledge us until he made sure his folks were in the hole fishing. I said something to him about his river etiquette (I was nice) and I got the no one owns the river line. One reason I'm not real fond of fishing the Kenai.

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