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Thread: BrownBear vs Grizz

  1. #1
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    Default BrownBear vs Grizz

    Simple question; Whats the diff???
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    Simply where they live. B&C classify them differently than other organizations I believe. There used to be a theory that they were actually different, but I believe it's been disproved and they are exacly the same, they are just classified based on where they live.
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    http://www.nrmsc.usgs.gov/files/noro...ly_Chapter.pdf

    There ya go, Chip, plenty of night-time reading in that file if you want to delve into the science of it all <grin>.

    Basically it's a matter of size difference. Your (larger) brown bear is located in coastal areas whereas the smaller grizzly is more interior.

    As far as taxonomy and subspecies, there is the Ursus arctos horribilis (grizzly), the Ursus arctos middendorffi of the Kodiak archipelago, and another subspecies is proposed for the Alaska panhandle for brown bears, Ursus arctos dalli.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfoot View Post
    Simply where they live. B&C classify them differently than other organizations I believe. There used to be a theory that they were actually different, but I believe it's been disproved and they are exacly the same, they are just classified based on where they live.
    here is the BOONE and Crocket bounry line for brown vs Griz..

    http://www.boone-crockett.org/bgReco...area=bgRecords
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    Simple question; Whats the diff???

    If they are chewing on you, One will take BIG bites, The other HUGE bites........

  6. #6

    Smile Good question

    I was also think about how to tell the difference between a very large black bear and a say a grizzly.

    The only way that I think you can truly tell is to smell and view sample of the bears crap (feces) that they behind. What you'll find is that black bear crap will have a rougher texture with berries/grain in it and smells terrible. Grizzly crap will have also have a rough texture with silver bells and orange whistles in it and smells like pepper spray.

    Just wanted everyone to know the difference.

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    Way cool.

    I figured as much and the closest I had hered was tha Grizz live East of the Rockies and Browns live West, eating Salmon......and crossing the Divide would change any such bear, respective of his travles....but that was 25th hand info and I like details~~LOL!!~~

    Thanks!!
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  8. #8

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    I'm no bear expert but I have yet to see a "brown" bear that wasnt brown in color. Grizzlies seem to have several color variations, Why?

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    I've seen a lot of color variation in brown bears as well as grizzlies. I've been to several locations and I think the color variations have something to do with genetics. I'm not a biologist, but that's my theory anyway.
    SCI has a better definition that B&C, IMO. Any GMU that is on the coast is brown bear, and everything else is grizz.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic Dustoff View Post
    I was also think about how to tell the difference between a very large black bear and a say a grizzly.

    The only way that I think you can truly tell is to smell and view sample of the bears crap (feces) that they behind. What you'll find is that black bear crap will have a rougher texture with berries/grain in it and smells terrible. Grizzly crap will have also have a rough texture with silver bells and orange whistles in it and smells like pepper spray.

    Just wanted everyone to know the difference.

    man I love this site

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Engel View Post
    I'm no bear expert but I have yet to see a "brown" bear that wasnt brown in color. Grizzlies seem to have several color variations, Why?
    I saw numerous blonde brown bears on last year's trip to the AK peninsula. Although mine is mostly brown it had silver tips. My buddy killed a beautiful blonde brownie down there. It looks just like an interior grizz.

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    Default The difference is in the diet...

    The explanation I've heard is that the cutoff line between the Brown bear area and Grizz area is roughly equivalent to the major salmon travel corridors. In other words, if they eat a lot of salmon, they are brown bear and if not they are grizz. That is also why the browns get bigger than the grizz...better food source. I think it was in Tony Russ' bear hunting book. It also explains why the Browns are along the coast, and grizz are in the interior.

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    Default There have been a number of articles over this

    I have to wonder if the bears,like many other animals arn't cross breeding?
    Wolves even cyotes have accepted domestic dogs and bred with them , why not the bears?

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    Default brown vs grizz

    I asked this question several years ago to a WSU biologist and his answer was that they are the same, however they are classified as a brown bear if they live within 100 miles of the coast. usually larger due to their diet (mainly fish in the fall).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arleigh View Post
    I have to wonder if the bears,like many other animals arn't cross breeding?
    Wolves even cyotes have accepted domestic dogs and bred with them , why not the bears?

    Since Grizz and Browns are technically the same, only difference being geographical location, it's not really cross breeding. Some areas will carry different genetic traits, but they're not technically hybrids

  16. #16

    Default Breeding

    Quote Originally Posted by BrentC View Post
    Since Grizz and Browns are technically the same, only difference being geographical location, it's not really cross breeding. Some areas will carry different genetic traits, but they're not technically hybrids

    Unless, of course, they are brother and sister or 1st cousins. Oh, sorry that would be in-breeding not cross-breeding. Do they have Brown/Grizzly's in North Georgia??

    Just kidding.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic Dustoff View Post
    Unless, of course, they are brother and sister or 1st cousins. Oh, sorry that would be in-breeding not cross-breeding. Do they have Brown/Grizzly's in North Georgia??

    Just kidding.
    I believe that east of the Rockies they are confined to a small population in Arkansas. They are easy to distinguish due to their abnormally close-set eyes and the frequent occurrence of extra toes, hemophilia, etc.

    Now...what is really interesting to me is Vancouver Island black bears. They are the biggest in the world, and now considered to be a separate sub-species of black bear. I read somewhere awhile back that they are believed to have been isolated from the mainland black bear population for several thousand years and are actually genetically more similar to grizz than mainland blacks. Some day I'm going to hunt them.
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