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Thread: short or long shaft for the square stern?

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    Default short or long shaft for the square stern?

    I recently picked up an 16' Osagian Square Stern Canoe and now looking for the right 5 hp outboard for it (as rated)...but also would entertain the idea of a 6 hp as well. The canoe has no lift and the stern is approximately 15" in height as I think the short shaft makes sense now that I am looking for a outboard motor. A salesman mentioned I could use a 20" shaft as well. What to do...

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
    I recently picked up an 16' Osagian Square Stern Canoe and now looking for the right 5 hp outboard for it (as rated)...but also would entertain the idea of a 6 hp as well. The canoe has no lift and the stern is approximately 15" in height as I think the short shaft makes sense now that I am looking for a outboard motor. A salesman mentioned I could use a 20" shaft as well. What to do...
    tell that salesman to piss off. he's prob. just trying to get rid of a long shaft that won't sell because nobody wants it as a kicker on their larger boat (too little hp) or nobody runnin rivers wants it. you certainly can use a long shaft, but it isnt ideal. for your osagain, I would recomend a 6-8 horse.....no more. A 9.8 would be too much weight and power. an older suzuki 6, 8 or a yammi 8 horse would be ideal. a 65 lb. motor would be a good target weight. single cylinder motors don't appear to have as much torque as a twin cylinder either. So if you did go with one of the new four-strokes, a six hp single cylinder might work out ok. tohatsu, and suzuki both make a nice motor for your application.

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    Thanks for the information; I'll look for a short shaft and I also have a little bit of time to get a motor before I need it. I'll also look for a 6 hp or so, and consider a used outboard as well. I did a web-search and noticed Nissan and Mercury had a nice set-up but I have no preference for the motor.
    The one that got my attention was a Briggs and Stratton outboard for the price...but I would tend to lean for the mainstream production motor.

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    Default motors

    the best motors are the ones that start and make sure that there is no shear pin in the hub

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    I'd sure buy from a different salesman.....you'd be hitting bottom way soon.....On some canoe/motor combinations you can run a 15" motor on a 20" transom and that keeps that prop up off the bottom another 5"........On my 19' Grummman I raised the transom about 3" and ran an 8HP OB very well.

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    Default 16' osagian motor

    With the Search function on this forum, you can find numerous discussions of motors - horsepower, shaft length and weight - for use on freighters.

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    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    I have heard that the Briggs and Stratton are noisey and rattle quite a bit. I would think that a B&S 5 hp motor should be reliable enough though. I have not run one, but think that it might be worth while to consider. The price is certainly appealing.
    If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction.
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    the Johnson/Evinrude 8hp two strokes made in the 80's-90's weight ~56#, and can be found in good used shape for $4-500 here and there, and occasionally you'll find one in a garage sale for $2-300. Pretty bulletproof motors, and no problems getting parts. So long as the engine has good compression, the most you'll have to do to a used motor is put in a new water pump, clean up the carb, and maybe get a spare prop.

    You could use a long shaft with a lift or transom extension, but that adds weight up high, where you don't want it, and in general a 10 horse or under o/b that is a long shaft is something you'll find is trouble then it's worth, and nobody will want to buy it should you desire to sell it in the future.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    the Johnson/Evinrude 8hp two strokes made in the 80's-90's weight ~56#, and can be found in good used shape for $4-500 here and there, and occasionally you'll find one in a garage sale for $2-300. Pretty bulletproof motors, and no problems getting parts. So long as the engine has good compression, the most you'll have to do to a used motor is put in a new water pump, clean up the carb, and maybe get a spare prop.

    You could use a long shaft with a lift or transom extension, but that adds weight up high, where you don't want it, and in general a 10 horse or under o/b that is a long shaft is something you'll find is trouble then it's worth, and nobody will want to buy it should you desire to sell it in the future.
    I second the 80s Johnson/Evinrude 7 1/2s and 8s being good motors. Easy to work and a lot of power in a small package. Lots of parts out there. I bought one last year, an 80 Johnson 7 1/2 short shaft, thinking it would be perfect for my Osagian 17' with a lift I made. Ran great without the lift with plenty of power but with the lift on the prop would come out of the water at full throttle. I figured out it was because the cavitation plate on that model is bigger and the motor needs to set a little bit deeper in the water. Don't have that problem with my old 9 1/2 Evinrude or my little 4 1/2 Merc with the lift on.
    Anyway, I sold it for what I had in it and on the lookout for the same motor in long shaft. The only thing I have against it is that it's shear pin drive, but that's something I can work around. Zack

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