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Thread: Outboard Maintenance

  1. #1

    Question Outboard Maintenance

    I'm going through the maintenance requirements for my Outboard. Something struck me as odd on the PM table. There's no mention of the water pump inspection or replacement. I was under impression that the pump impellers get deformed after a while and should be replaced or flipped over. Do you guys ever inspect your pumps?
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  2. #2
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    Its always good to inspect the pumps or replace them every other year or if you notice the pressure weakening on your "pee" stream. When the pumps go out, it is usually due to the impeller stripping away from the hard plastic mount. So it just sits there and free spins, causing it to not pump water. The water pump kits are usually the cheapest way to go and replacing the entire assembly is the best thing to do anyways. And its easy to do, as long as you know how to take off your lower unit. Make sure the impeller rubber fins are placed to go the way the shaft turns also or it will disinegrate. Note which way the old one was facing when it came out.

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    On my suzuki DF-140 I changed out the pump last year. I asked the shop when I should change it out and they said so long as it works well you shouldn't have to worry about it. Even though my engine is only 3 years old with ~250 hours on it I figured I'd change it out just in case. The pump looked like new when I replaced it, so now I have a spare impellor that looks as good as I knew. I figure it's cheap insurance.

    Also make sure to put some nickle based anti-sieze on your bolts when you bolt your lower end back on.

    I pulled the lower end on my mid 80's e-rude 8 horse kicker that I picked up used with not alot of hours on it a few years back, and I doubt I've put 5 gallons through it in 3 years. I figured the impellor probably needed replacing, but it looks fine to me, so I bolted it back up. There was some carbon build up on the drive shaft and some rust, so I polished up the shaft.

  4. #4

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    Glad to here the Old rude is still running great. I never had any problems with it in all the years I ran it.

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Kurt,

    I just need to find a good deal on a 15 horse short shaft rude or johnson. It's a great engine, just not quite enough power for the inflatable and 3 or 4 people. It'll get me on step just fine, or me and one of the boys.

    I'm thinking I need to make a freighter canoe, as it'll be the perfect engine for that use.

  6. #6
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    I replaced mine this winter, it had about 600 hours on it. To be honest it had very little wear, I boat in the sound so it's not like running in some of the dirtier water.

  7. #7

    Default I wonder

    Quote Originally Posted by Muskie View Post
    I replaced mine this winter, it had about 600 hours on it. To be honest it had very little wear, I boat in the sound so it's not like running in some of the dirtier water.
    Mine's got 450 on it. I figure it's ok. Seward and PWS only. I'll tear it down this fall.
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  8. #8
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    I had mine replaced on the old boat with over 800 hours on them. The old pair looked brand new. The water in the sound is relatively clean. As long as they are peeing strong at idle, I wouldn't worry too much about it. How difficult of a procedure is it?
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  9. #9

    Default Kinda of a PITA

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    I had mine replaced on the old boat with over 800 hours on them. The old pair looked brand new. The water in the sound is relatively clean. As long as they are peeing strong at idle, I wouldn't worry too much about it. How difficult of a procedure is it?
    You have to pull the lower unit to get to it. Probably takes an hour or so. I don't think special tools are needed.
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  10. #10

    Question Did You

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    I had mine replaced on the old boat with over 800 hours on them. The old pair looked brand new. The water in the sound is relatively clean. As long as they are peeing strong at idle, I wouldn't worry too much about it. How difficult of a procedure is it?
    Change your timing belts Pete? I got this cooking on a diferent thread.
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  11. #11
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug from Anchorage View Post
    Change your timing belts Pete? I got this cooking on a diferent thread.
    I haven't yet. I don't think I did on the old ones either. Let me know how that goes.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  12. #12
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    Every 2 yrs as we churn through gravel and sand when camping,hunting.
    Lots of silt in the rivers out here.

  13. #13
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Salt water

    My manual says in salt water to change it every year. Every other works fine. If it goes while on the water your paddling. I paddled a 21' Aurora for 1 mile, anchored up to a buoy, rafted 1/2 mile to shore and walked 10 miles back to port across the north shore of Port Valdez in April. It wasn't fun.

    Last one was in for two years so I checked it this year and sure enough 3 of five fins were cracked and ready to fail.

    I change it every other year now!!!!!

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  14. #14

    Default I don't know....

    I just replaced mine for the first time ever and they still looked pretty good. Not bad for 1100 hours give or take. I didn't buy the boat new so they probably have been changed, but not for a long, long time. I have never changed it in my 78 evinrude 140 and have owned it since 1992. It still works just fine, but is run in clean fresh water. I think the trailer queen boats have them last much longer since they actually get to drain and dry out. Ones sitting around in the salt probably don't have a prayer making much past a season or two.

  15. #15

    Exclamation Manufacturer's Recomendation

    I called Yamaha Marine in Georgia. The said to inspect the impeller every year or 100 hrs. And replace every 3 or 300 hrs. Apparently it was not published in my owners manual, but the newer ones have it.
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  16. #16

    Smile depends...

    Some of the water pump life depends on what type of water you are running in. A clear fresh water lake is probably easier on parts then salt water and a silty glacier fed Alaskan River is probably the worst. I have found the digital camera to be a valuable asset when I take something a part. It's like having directions and works better then my memory.

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