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Thread: Went out of Seward today ...

  1. #1
    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    Default Went out of Seward today ...

    AND THE FORCAST WAS WRONG !!!!!

    When I launched at 8:15 AM all was good and the forcast for Cape Suckling to Gore Point was for 3 ft. seas getting better as the day went on winds dropping to 10 kt variable, Seward was no more than 2 ft with winds light and variable ....

    Well ... I hung a left at Cape Reserection and Barrwell Is. all good cruising at 30 mph ... along about Cape Farewell (on my way to south Montague Is.) it started going down hill, half way to Montague from Farewell I was looking at 5 to 7 ft seas coming right at me, bang bang bang ... lots of whitecaps and a dark line on the horizon.

    I said enough of this, I had good luck in the past at cape Puget, not far away and I could work with these seas if not heading stright into them. When getting close I decided to change course and head to the west side of Ellerington Is. (Sp?) there is a good less than 200 ft footprint on the south end facing the Ocean. I Also fount three under water hills in that same area. The Hills rose from 200 ft to at one point I had a 29 ft. reading on my depth sounder. The Sounder was showing "shreads" of fish, too many for individual fish, soooooooooo. Even though it was uncomfortable I dropped anchor and was NOT able to get my white lead headed jig to the bottom ... where the anchor hooked up the bottom was less than 60 ft. When I caught the first rockfish, I unhooked the jig and threw it back in the water, I went to cut the gills to bleed the fish I had put in the cooler, all of a sudden my G Loomis poll started started going crazy, the jig was no more than 4 ft in the water but was being swarmed by rockfish dieing to be caught. Needless to say in about 10 minutes I had my limit of 4 all in the 10 lb range.

    The waether continued to go down hill so I decided to head back, could not even make the dock in Seward because of the wind gusts, scraped up my Osprey and got some pole tare on it. I am sure everone who saw it were LTAO. All in all a realllllly bad day ... but I found a new hotspot, want to go back there after July 1st. ... bet you on a good day you could get some great big Ling Cod.

  2. #2

    Default Docking in wind

    Thanks for sharing your day at sea, ocnfish. Leaving Seward, you can be reminded very quickly that you are boating on the Gulf of Alaska. I was out last Saturday, just fishing the bay out to Mary's Bay on Rugged Island. A few tugs on the line, caught one rockfish and one nice lingcod (which, of course, was promptly released). Very calm in the morning, a little rougher coming in, with a brisk onshore breeze.

    Arriving back at Seward Harbor, I was docking at my newly rented slip for the first time. Thought I knew what I was doing. Didn't. Banged the dock a couple of times, had to have the crew keep us away from a couple of neighbor's boats (didn't hit anybody, thankfully!) and finally figured out how to use the wind rather than fight it. This week I googled "docking in wind" and found a slew of articles. Just wanted you to know that when it comes to having difficulties docking in the wind, you are not alone!

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    I thought I was 1/2 decent at docking until I came into whittier in a stiff cross breeze. Fortunately I haven't hit anybody, but I sure look like a tyro getting spun around trying where to point the o/b and if I should be in forward or reverse.

  4. #4
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Default

    Glad to hear I'm not the only one that has had trouble docking with wind. Man I see some pro just whip in and out with the wind, where's I
    creepy and praying I don't bump into anyone. Knock on wood so far I haven't bumped into anyone.
    I have before waited for a certain spot on the dock to where's the wind would blow me into the dock instead of going to the other side and fight it.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  5. #5
    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    Default Practice, practice

    I used to bump and grind into the dock, till I had a friend tell me I needed to practice. So I took him up on it and said lets go down to the dock on a windy and tide strong day. You show me how and then let me try it, a few hours later and I was a pro. Now people say how do you do that? Let the currant and wind help. It is a lot easier. Good luck see you at the dock. Gerberman

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by gerberman View Post
    I used to bump and grind into the dock, till I had a friend tell me I needed to practice. So I took him up on it and said lets go down to the dock on a windy and tide strong day. You show me how and then let me try it, a few hours later and I was a pro. Now people say how do you do that? Let the currant and wind help. It is a lot easier. Good luck see you at the dock. Gerberman

    Ah....If only I could show off like that I have years of practice and wouldn't call what I do professional.....but some of us never learn....

  7. #7
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Twin-inboards for the docking win.

    And bow-thrusters are cheating.


  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by coho slayer View Post
    Twin-inboards for the docking win.

    And bow-thrusters are cheating.

    You said it brother! Twin outboards---spin on a dime!

  9. #9
    Member FISHFACE's Avatar
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    Default

    not as good as twin outdrives or twin inboards. not even close.
    Boatless

  10. #10
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Yup...twin-inboards is what I said, and I'm sticking to it. Outboards don't even come close comparatively speaking. If you know what you're doing, you can move a boat sideways with inboards. I've yet to see someone be successful at that with outboards, although they are good for just jockeying the stern around....

  11. #11
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default Awwww... Twins?

    If bowthrusters are cheating, so much more is having Twin engines an easy way out... Nice option tho

    You can move a boat straight sideways with one engine, if you practice

    Pull up to an empty fuel dock or some similar and mess around, figure out what your boat wants to do (they're all unique I believe) totally fun to get the feel for drift and little kicks of power this way and that, figure it out in the open and every docking after that will be fun and entertaining, no more intimidation by wind again

    Another key, don't use too much power, just little kicks, baby her in there a lot and when there is a huge wind factor you'll be able to come in hard and snug her right where you need her
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by coho slayer View Post
    Yup...twin-inboards is what I said, and I'm sticking to it. Outboards don't even come close comparatively speaking. If you know what you're doing, you can move a boat sideways with inboards. I've yet to see someone be successful at that with outboards, although they are good for just jockeying the stern around....
    All I meant was having twin means of propulsion is far better than a single one. I'm really sorry if I misconstrued what you were saying.

    OK. So I can't "move my boat sideways" but I can move forward, backwards and also spin on a dime with twin outboards. Maybe when I first started trying to dock a boat it would have been nice to have the ability to move sideways, but I don't find it to be something I really wish I could do now. I'm not aware of any situation where it becomes a desirable trait to have in a boat other than when the wind is just howling directly perpendicular to my slip. I don't have any problem getting into a parking space with my truck and it doesn't move sideways (unless the wind is blowing really, REALLY hard).

    Kodiakrain---the nice thing I've found about having twin powerplants is, if one of them quits at least you've got a spare. I know people will say, "but I have a kicker." I've used kickers before and I sure would rather have to get 20 miles back to port with my second 115 than a 9.9 high thrust kicker or something along those lines. Especially if it's "snotty" out there. But of course that's my own personal opinion.

  13. #13
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default Yep, I agree

    Yes, that is a Definite, twin mains are better, more maneuverable, reliable for sure,

    and I also agree the idea of needing to move sideways is not really all that applicable, (Sometimes at a crowded Fuel dock it's cool to pull off tho), thought I'd just toss it in for those with one main engine that using the forward momentum and light kicks of power and/or some strategic steering is all that is needed for most any situation, Practice is the key.

    Just as some can't afford another engine or have a boat that can't fit another engine, I tossed in that Awww Twins? comment.
    was kinda kidding the guys with Twin Dependency ,

    You can do heavy weather docking with one engine and is fun to figure out
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  14. #14
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    I really wasn't trying to be argumentative...lol.

    Not everyone has twin engines, and obviously you have to make do with whatever you have and can afford. Practice does help, no matter your set up.

    I'm actually generally partial to twin outboards for deck space and speed reasons. It's just not as maneuvable in tight spots, but that's not a big deal in the big picture.

  15. #15
    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Having run boats for a living for the last 25 years, I have found that most often private boaters fail to judge the effect that the wind is going to have on their boats. Wind and current are really factors that you can control and use to your advantage when trying to manuvuer. Most boats handle better backing into the wind ( since the house is a sail, when it is down wind, and the stern is up wind, there is no where for the wind to move the boat. In addition, the stern is where the propellers are so it is the first place to move when turning. So let the wind bow your bow ( can cabin around and try backing into the wind to get where you are going.
    Another mistake I see guys make over and over is to try to power out of a bad situation. If you have a boat under 30' and you start to lose control, just put out a bouy ball and use it to fend off other boats. Trying to power out just creates more force in the wrong direction.
    One more... it looks really bad when you blame your wife and yell at her. Happens all the time in Seward, and blaming your wife for your inability to controal the boat, when she it standing out in rain and wind with a bow line is the epitome of a rank amature.

    Twins, single, outboards, inboard just practice a little more and when you screw up, put out a bouy ball and laugh about it. It'll make it much more fun.

  16. #16

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    What I need to practice with is a rubber dock or slip out in the middle of the water! With no wind, it's a non-issue. But with wind and having a single I/O, it bites. With a single, the boat tends to walk more one way than the other because of the direction the prop spins, so it takes some practice getting used to it. Especially when backing up. A little stressful on really windy days coming into Whitter to retrieve the boat and rounding that last corner hoping the dock isn't full and you've got people trying to hold in place waiting for a spot to open up. Especially during a minus tide.

  17. #17
    Member Alaskanmutt's Avatar
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    Default In Whittier

    when I come around the last corner and the wind is howling I just raft up to the boats at the end of the first finger. Last year I had tied off and grabbed the next boat and tied him to me, ended up being 3 boats deep there (not blocking the channel) First spot opened and I told the other boat to grab it. As soon as a spot opened he called me over and held it for me
    2000 Bayliner Ciera Express 2452
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  18. #18
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default "Crash Bags Out," and all is well

    AkCapt makes some good points,

    especially the part about "Powering out", I think that just "amps up" everyone around especially yourself and it is almost always followed by something bad or unanticipated,

    Also I highly agree with "throw some bouys out," have them ready ahead of time so all you have to do is flop them over the side (they're already strategically placed and tied to rail) when approaching even an open dock and suddenly "All is Well with the world" when you know you'll feel that "Cuuussshhh" feel of impact when and if something does impact.

    This is the key to not feeling like yelling at anybody, (YES, NOT AN OPTION) when you are prepped with "Crash Bags" as we commercial guys call them it's all sooo much easier

    Ever notice professional mariners approaching a dock? The bags are always down or deckhands are standing with one in their hand to respond to anything, and those are guys who do this WAY more than you ever will, so don't be too proud to "Get the Crash Bags Out"

    Your Passengers Happiness and Peace is well worth it.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  19. #19
    Member coho slayer's Avatar
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    Also, if you're new to the whole cabin cruiser/docking scene, remember the bow...especially if you have an anchor hanging off of it...sticks out quite a bit. I've seen more then one guy trying to dock, get blown off course, goose it to try to correct, and punch the anchor through his neighbor's boat window. Not cool.

    If you're in doubt, you may not look as cool, but throwing out the bumpers and tossing some lines to helpful folks on the docks will save you some money in the long run.

  20. #20
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKCAPT View Post
    Having run boats for a living for the last 25 years, I have found that most often private boaters fail to judge the effect that the wind is going to have on their boats. Wind and current are really factors that you can control and use to your advantage when trying to manuvuer. Most boats handle better backing into the wind ( since the house is a sail, when it is down wind, and the stern is up wind, there is no where for the wind to move the boat. In addition, the stern is where the propellers are so it is the first place to move when turning. So let the wind bow your bow ( can cabin around and try backing into the wind to get where you are going.
    Another mistake I see guys make over and over is to try to power out of a bad situation. If you have a boat under 30' and you start to lose control, just put out a bouy ball and use it to fend off other boats. Trying to power out just creates more force in the wrong direction.
    One more... it looks really bad when you blame your wife and yell at her. Happens all the time in Seward, and blaming your wife for your inability to controal the boat, when she it standing out in rain and wind with a bow line is the epitome of a rank amature.

    Twins, single, outboards, inboard just practice a little more and when you screw up, put out a bouy ball and laugh about it. It'll make it much more fun.
    Well said... beginning of every season I go out and get that feeling bad.. Practice practice.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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