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Thread: Emergency equipment

  1. #1
    Member idakfisher's Avatar
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    Default Emergency equipment

    I see a number a boats carry an inflatable raft. How important do you consider this piece of equipment? And should one invest in survival-flotation suits? My present boat really doesn't have room for a raft, but since I am boat shopping, I can make the room a requirement, if needed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by idakfisher View Post
    I see a number a boats carry an inflatable raft. How important do you consider this piece of equipment? And should one invest in survival-flotation suits? My present boat really doesn't have room for a raft, but since I am boat shopping, I can make the room a requirement, if needed.
    Raft is usually for getting to shore after anchoring. If you tell the wife it's a safety item, it's usually easier to make the purchase. I may have misinformed you, I don't know the size of your boat or experience level. Always be ready to stay until better weather conditions or tide change or both.

  3. #3
    Member idakfisher's Avatar
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    I am presently running a 24 trophy and am experienced on fresh water, but only one year on the salt. So, I was wondering if the raft was a very important piece of safety equipment. I do not plan on going out in iffy seas or taking shore trips.

  4. #4
    Member Alaskanmutt's Avatar
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    Default Mine is only for going to the beach.

    Of course if the boat is sinking, cut 2 strap and it becomes a liferaft
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  5. #5

    Default For Safety and Convenience

    In the event that should somehow swamp your boat, it's comforting to know you can gather your passangers and ditch bag and make it to shore. I know the odds are small, but with my luck, I don't play the odds.

    Beyond that, after being on board for hours on end, it's kinda nice to be able to walk around on shore and explore, berrypick, or whatever.

    Bottom line, the cost of an inflatable dingy is minimal considering the total cost of boating. I find it totally worth it.
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  6. #6
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default big boats

    you fellas and your big ole boats. I simply only have the liferaft :-(

  7. #7
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The #1 piece of safety equipment is located between your ears.

    As far as additional equipment, the waters we boat in are very cold, and we have limited coast guard presence and not all boaters in the sound respond to distress calls. So, you need to carry on board what will allow you to survive for many hours in our waters, and better yet something that will get you out of those cold waters and onto shore.

    On our first season I was too strapped for an inflatable, but did get cold water imersion suits. Check Craigs list and e-bay, you can find used ones for a bit over $100.

    The second season out I got a small inflatable, and even on trips where I don't plan on going to shore, I take it with us. And in some Anchorages, a dinghy is essential to getting on shore. It's also alot of fun for the kids to paddle around in, as well as using on local lakes.

  8. #8

    Default Safety Equipment

    I have a small inflatable, but, as the other guys commented, it is primarily for going ashore. My boat is smaller than yours--a Trophy 1902 with an aluminum rack--but for an emergency ditching I carry a 4 man life raft (a Revere 4 man coastal compact--they say it can take 6 in a pinch). It weighs 16 pounds and its size is 16.5"x13"x5". It costs about $1300 (you can see it at http://www.reveresupply.com/revere_2...l_compact.html). A better choice would probably be the Switlik Rescue Pod, but it costs almost twice the amount of the Revere (http://www.switlik.com/marine-catalog-pod-4.html). Both rafts have won an award or two for their design.

    Then I have a small ditch bag with a portable marine radio, an EPIRB, and a few other safety items. Of course, I hope I never see how the raft works, but anything that can keep you out of the water is a plus.

  9. #9
    Member idakfisher's Avatar
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    Default

    I guess that from a safety point, the inflatables' advantage would be that if you put a hole in your boat and are sinking, the raft would be kind of nice to have. The inflatable can be considered an insurance policy that you should purchase if you can afford the premium.

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