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Thread: Glow for Halibut

  1. #1
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    Default Glow for Halibut

    Guys last year when i was up Glow Jigs just did not produce like the other colors did. Maybe that was just not the color that was "on" my days on the water out of Homer. Now its time to paint some more up and buy some more tails. What are your favorite colors for butts? Thoughts on Glow?

  2. #2

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    There have been a couple of other threads regarding this recently. You might want to try a search for them. Some pretty good information there.

  3. #3
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    White with either blue or red in it. Chartruse, cinamon with metal flakes.
    These colors have worked great for me.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  4. #4

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    I've experimented a lot with glow and found a lot of "trends," but I'll stop short of calling them rules. Glow usually works better on sunny days rather than overcast, and in shallower water rather than deep. Seems backwards from what you would guess, but there you have it. More "research" required, for sure. Glow is on the list of colors I try, but I don't think it's a cure-all, or for that matter, that there is such a thing.

    To the list of colors you already have (and good ones too), I'll say florescent green over white (not chartreuse- it's more lime green than yellow) is my top producer down to about 80 or 90 feet. Deeper than that I have better luck with black or black over white. Sometimes on overcast days pure white will knock your socks of in the shallows. Mid-July when the halibut bite usually dies off for a week or two, for some reason orange, motor oil or olive green rubber tails are just deadly near kelp beds. Gut the fish and they're full of small crabs, so maybe that has something to do with it.

    I carry just about every color of jig and rubbertail known to man. Sooner or later one of them is going to work better than the others. The big thing is to switch when one isn't working. Too often to count, I've found places with "no" halibut actually have halibut down there waiting for you to switch to the right color.

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Also you don't have to rely on just leadheads with grubs. Chrome diamond jigs can be deadly, as well as metal jigs in blue/silver, green/silver, white and sometimes pink/white.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    white and sometimes pink/white.
    I've had success with lead heads with pink/white skirts also. Also, I know I'm not the only one who does this, but I don't hear about it here much and that is using the white side skin from a halibut right on the hook (either jig head or circle). It's tough as nails, never comes off, and really produces.

  7. #7
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    How deep do you plan to fish, what kind of structure will you be fishing on, and what size of halibut are you targeting?

    I have had mixed results sweetening the jig. I usually end up catching a lot more non-target fish like scuplin, small cod, and rockfish. I spend too much time reeling them in rather than keeping the jig on the bottom.

    Big_E

  8. #8

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    For me the results of "sweetening" are variable with location. But most of the places (and depths) I fish, it's a decided advantage. Just don't go so big that it slows the sink of the jig or kills the action. For me a triangular piece about an inch long and half an inch wide is plenty for large jigs, and about half that wide for small jigs. All you want is a "little" for smell. I generally fish from 10 feet to 120 feet, depending on the location, time of year, and what else is going on. Ten feet? Try it right off river mouths in August when the humpies are running or up among the reefs and kelp when the needlefish schools are shallow. You can actually watch the halibut hit.

    What do I sweeten with? Whatever is the first thing I catch with a piece of herring fillet for sweetener. Could be cod, sculpin, flounder, greenling, rockfish, whatever. My theory is that the halibut are there to feed on whatever small fish I also caught, so adding that particular smell to the jig is a bonus. Sometimes herring continues to be the best sweetener, but very often it's the herring that attracts the species you'd rather not catch.

  9. #9
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    I will be up July 13-24th and we usually fish in 150ft or so. Not a rocky bottom as we have never had a snag.

  10. #10

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    Wow. Atsa lotta watta in July!

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