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Thread: Brand new handgun, how to break in

  1. #1
    Member woodman6437's Avatar
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    Default Brand new handgun, how to break in

    After 4 months of waiting, it looks like tomorrow will finally be the day that my S&W .460 comes in. This isn't my first gun, but it is my first brand new, never been fired gun. I was wondering what kind of steps people take when "breaking in" a new handgun.

  2. #2
    Member jrt34's Avatar
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    Default Shoot, swab, then shoot some more

    This is a good question. I have a little routine that I use for rifles but I've never thought about breaking in a new handgun. Usually when I get a new revolver I just run a box of rounds through it and clean it and thats it. For long guns I shoot a round, swab, and then shoot a round. I do this about 10 - 15 times, then switch to swabbing every three rounds for about another 10, then call it good.

    Either way, nice piece and good luck.

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    Shoot it. Clean it when it wont work or the accuracy goes to hell. Other wise save your cleaning patches and your time.
    Henry Bowman for President

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    Member wildwill's Avatar
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    Default Shoot it, clean it, and repeat.

    I too have a little process I follow for match rifles, but on my handguns, customs included, I just shoot the hell out of them. Keep it well lubed, feed it lots of rounds, and enjoy.
    Since the World is 2/3 Water and Only 1/3 Land, Figures the Good Lord Intended I Fish More Than I Plow.

  5. #5
    RMK
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    Default I never gave that any thought

    Is there such a thing? I have always headed to the range and fired away. I've put several thousand rounds through my Glock 21, so it's beyond broke in.

    I did pick up new model 30 last year, and didn't do anything special. I have been told to rotate my mags ever few months. I don't know if it's true or not, but I was told the spring looses some of its springyness if it compressed by a full load of ammo for months on end. It sounds logical I guess.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default True advice

    Quote Originally Posted by wildwill View Post
    ...just shoot the hell out of them. Keep it well lubed, feed it lots of rounds, and enjoy.
    Shoot the hell out of it and enjoy, then clean well until next time. That goes for most any new gun.

    But I'm sure there are those with a quasi religious methodology who will disagree.

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    Member woodman6437's Avatar
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    Thanks! I think I will just go with the shoot the crap out of it method, then clean it later. Maybe run a swab or two through it before hand to make sure there is no crap in the barrel from shipping.

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    Member JoeJ's Avatar
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    For what’s it worth, some people do “break-in” their revolvers if you plan on shooting mainly cast bullets. The break-in procedure is you fire up to 20 rounds of jacketed bullets and clean the barrel until it’s free of copper. Do this until you have 300 rounds of jacketed bullets fired and the barrel is about as good as it’s going to get relative to smoothing out the rough machine marks in the barrel. Others just lap their barrel if it’s a little on the rough side after showing signs of leading (not caused by velocity or undersized cast bullet) or retaining a small copper buildup in the barrel after a shooting session. I don’t think most revolver owners give a hoot one way or the other – it’s mainly the long range boys who do everything they can think of to shoot small groups.

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    Member atvalaska's Avatar
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    Thumbs up yup!!

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Shoot the hell out of it and enjoy, then clean well until next time. That goes for most any new gun.

    But I'm sure there are those with a quasi religious methodology who will disagree.
    and shoot it some more !!!
    WHEN IN DOUBT> THROTTLE OUT.......

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Keep the moving parts oiled whether it's new or old. The oil will provide cushioning between the metal surfaces and extend the life of your big gun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RMK View Post
    Is there such a thing? I have always headed to the range and fired away. I've put several thousand rounds through my Glock 21, so it's beyond broke in.

    I did pick up new model 30 last year, and didn't do anything special. I have been told to rotate my mags ever few months. I don't know if it's true or not, but I was told the spring looses some of its springyness if it compressed by a full load of ammo for months on end. It sounds logical I guess.
    From what I understand, modern steel springs don't weaken from being compressed for extended periods. Rather they "might" weaken from repeated compression/decompression cycles, but this would be an extremely large number. So, storing a loaded magazine isn't supposed to be a bad thing anymore. Note, the ammo itself might get banged around a bit inside a magazine. Over time it may be subjected to drops, temperature cycles, oil drips, whatever, so it would behoove you to periodically rotate your ammo. Which, of course, is best done by taking a trip to the range.

  12. #12
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    Generally the shoot and clean method only applies to rifles and not hand guns. The 460 S&W however has velocity in the lower rifle range and will leave a lot of copper fouling in the barrel. This must be cleaned out frequently or it will cause accuracy problems. With the 460 you'll want to take breaks from shooting to let your hands recover and this would be a good time to clean out the copper. If you plan to shoot hard cast in the gun the barrel must be smooth as a baby's butt. A few hundred jacketed rounds and good cleaning will usually bring this about. I know S&W barrels are generally very slick but you'll see the copper after you clean out the carbon. Have fun with it. A brand new one is nice indeed.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Default I just bought a Puma 454 stainless

    and i cleaned it right out of the box to get the cosmoline out of it and it was dirty as though it had been shot and just put into the box.
    Took it to the range last weekend and was very surprized at the charictor of kick it delivered , not as bad as I had expected. my very first groups were a little high but all touching. wich I could put a scope on it .

  14. #14
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    Yeah, shoot that 460 a LOT. After all, ammo is cheap.

    Smitty of the North
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    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
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  15. #15

    Default

    clean and lube it to make sure the parts fit and fuction togerther without any problems ..

    clean it between the strings to let you hands relax a little ..along with at the end of the session run a copper cleaning driped patch down the barrel to start the cleaning session intill you get home make the patch is a little wetter than normal to get the soulition all up in the barrel rifleing to help with cleaning ..use some type of copper cleaning product like butchs or 7.62 sweets ..to start the cleaning session

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