Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: In-shore Sea Lures

  1. #1

    Default In-shore Sea Lures

    I have a garage shop of disasembled computers and electronic kits purchased from "Make" interspersed with old fishing reels and gobs of bottom fishing lures of endless combination. I've been sucked into testing/trying out just about every new fishing lure combination, scents, lights, materials, color combinations.....does any of this this sound like you? Well, read on fellow tinkerer.

    OK, I'm coming out of the closet. Its all about gizmos. Admittedly, I like gizmos. When my spouse sees another package from UPS at the door she's ever more confident that my "problem" may ultimately require intervention. Sad case but true.

    As I know you are aware, most of the lure materials and combinations are attempting to simulate food or feeding patterns of fish, others are causing a territorial or strike impulse. There's so many combinations and influencing factors, environmental and otherwise, its a challenge to determine the percent of relative performance of one factor over another. But, the more I experiment and play around, one of the most compelling artificials to me is the use of light or lighted lures. It's not just good advertising by the manufacturers of fishing gizmos, there's something to be said for the use of light on the business end of your line. In the future we may find that the color of the light is even more important.

    Many of you are much more experienced and spend more time on the water than I have. There's some good ideas on this forum and I wonder what your success has been in the use of "light" for deep sea fishing?

    By the way, if you're not sure how light is used by fish or what effect/performance if might have in sports or commercial fishing I suggest that you check this out:

    http://www.ted.com/talks/edith_widde...ter_world.html

    I am not suggesting that light is the exclusive or even the primary lure bait. I would like to know yr experience and success of using light or lighting to attract fish and catch fish?

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I haven't seen any benefit of lights or glow in the dark lures, though I have experimented with them a bit. To me the important factors are: presentation/action, scent, and color or color combination. lighting might in some instances have a benefit. I'll take a silver scented jig over a fancy flashing light.

    I'm more into catching than mindlessly fishing, so if the fish aren't biting I'll be swapping jigs and trying something different until I find something that works. Other folks on the boat seem content to soak bait, and even with me spending less time on bottom due to changing tackle, I seem to have an equal catch rate to others.

  3. #3

    Default

    We appear to be popped out of the same mold fishing-wise, Paul. I experiment till I find what works, even if everyone around me is soaking.

    My experience with lights runs along the same lines. Dandy for cod and arrowtooth flounder, but pretty much ignored by halibut and kings. Catch some halibut on something else and switch to lights, boom. No more halibut, but you can't keep the cod off, or in deeper water, arrowtooth flounder. Same with my experiments on king salmon.

  4. #4
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,886

    Default fishing lights

    I too cannot say I have had much luck on the Halibut with lights either.
    When I was at the Anchorage Sportsmans show There was a guy selling the new Glo Crazy lures. He tried to get me to check them out.
    I told him I had not been having trouble catching a limit of Halibut with the lures,jigs,and other tackle I use. I then asked him what was my motivation to buy his lures. He was silent then said I had a good point.
    After you buy the lure you have to buy the refills. He assured me they last 10 hours in the cold inlet waters. Refills were 2.50 each. I did not buy any.
    I have had my slow days on the salt out of homer with Halibut but as long as I can get to one of my good holes we usually get our limit.
    Trying new spots can provide for some slow fishing but if they are there a guy can usually entice them to bite on some kind of conventional gear/jig.
    If they are not there then no light or gimmick can entice them to bite.
    Oftentimes if my normal gear doesn't produce then it is time to move.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    802

    Default Seeing the light...

    Tell me, I know all about it. I've been retailing LED submersible flashing lures for over 5 years. My customers have put in them controlled settings; presenting the same opportunity with and without light and have demonstrated an increase in 3:1 catch ratios.

    I discovered this right on this forum, over 6 years ago, when a Chinese inventor offered his free prototypes to anyone interested. Six readers responded, I was the only the one who made something of it.

    We worked together, with my eventually going all the way to Beijing to develop the product line. I've done well for a Little Guy, yet I never got over the hump of credibility.

    I'm in the process of being bought out by a charter skipper in Sitka. He's used the lights for years, and knows the technology well enough to make the overture.

    You bet lights work. Keep right on tinkering and good luck...

    Been There/Done That

    Rosenberg/Florida
    http://www.electronicfishinglures.com
    "Two decades researching and defining fishing opportunities in the Last Frontier!"


  6. #6

    Default

    I've never used the lighted lures, but might just give it a try.

    I have used the "glow" hoochies before with sporadic success and always will sink one or two, to see if they are being more effective at any one time. But I don't find that they make things that much better that that's all I ever use. Halibut seem to be pretty finicky creatures and some days one thing seems to work better and then the next it might be something different.

    But I'm a "tinkerer" too and just might have to look into Bernard's lures.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    802

    Default Lock Jaw...

    Yeah, well every bit helps.

    Yet I know darn well what many of you who fish already know; sometimes no matter what you do, schedule, present, entice, or offer, they are going to tell you, "no deal".

    It happens. Though I must add that in Alaska, this seems to be the exception to the rule. The fishing up there is simply World Class and I must say what a phenomonal place this 49th state is.

    I am fortunate to have discovered it, let alone play a tiny role in it...

    Rosenberg/Florida
    "Two decades researching and defining fishing opportunities in the Last Frontier!"


  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wasilla Alaska
    Posts
    456

    Default lights to trade

    I have a half dozen of the Lindgren Pitman Electralume lights (between $35 and $50 each) that were used one season. I'd be happy to trade them for a bucket of Steves shrimp crack! That's a smoking deal for someone wanting to see the light.
    Mike

  9. #9

    Default

    I wish I had "Bernard's" success with lights, but like "Paul H", I've tried those small strobe lights and can't say I've seen any difference in the catch rate. They do make a good conversation piece though. Some people actually think I know what I'm doing when I rig one up.

  10. #10
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    If you're comparing fishing with a jig (that happens to have a light) to a fishing with bait, I will agree on a 3:1 success ratio, but that will be due to the jig outfishing a chunk of bait.

    I can't think of a single time a baited hook has outfished a jig, but can think of many times the jigs outfishing bait 3:1 if not 10:1.

  11. #11

    Default

    If someone would like to send me a half dozen of them I'd be more than willing to give them a shot every time I go out there and keep a full accounting of their success ratio against anything else.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    If you're comparing fishing with a jig (that happens to have a light) to a fishing with bait, I will agree on a 3:1 success ratio, but that will be due to the jig outfishing a chunk of bait.

    I can't think of a single time a baited hook has outfished a jig, but can think of many times the jigs outfishing bait 3:1 if not 10:1.
    Care to sing harmony Paul? That's been my experience with jigs too. And I should have been more clear, because my reference to cod and arrowtooth was specifically about changing between conventional jigs and lighted lures of any sort that I've tried.

    Oh well, I don't have an economic stake in the lights. And I certainly don't want to discourage anyone else from experimenting.

  13. #13
    Member idakfisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Idaho/Soldotna
    Posts
    224

    Default jigs

    I love all of the info you guys share.

    So, Paul H, I have only had good luck soaking bait for halibut. And have not tried the jigs that much. Are you talking halibut of all sizes? And what kind of jigs---Lead head with a plastic trailer as well as the all metal jigs?

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by idakfisher View Post
    I love all of the info you guys share.

    So, Paul H, I have only had good luck soaking bait for halibut. And have not tried the jigs that much. Are you talking halibut of all sizes? And what kind of jigs---Lead head with a plastic trailer as well as the all metal jigs?
    I'll let Paul provide his own answers but for me, yeah, halibut of all sizes. I vary between leadheads with rubber tails, bucktails with plastic worms (deadly), darts and bars. Size, style and color are variable with season, water depth and feed. Forced to pick one, it would be either the bucktail and worm or the dart. But by switching back and forth through my jigs I can usually be onto the fish quicker than boatmates soaking bait, and often catch and release so many that they all switch. Holdouts can go fishless soaking bait, even as jigs catch steadily. On days when bait is working, jigs still work. It's a rare day that the jiggers have to switch to bait to keep up.

  15. #15
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Halibut of all size (remember the 400+ pounder the kodiak tackle guy got with his prototype jig?) lingcod, rockfish, salmon, cod, pollock, other odds and ends.

    I use leadheads, all metal jigs (poin wilson dart, crippled herring), butterfly style jigs, diamond jigs. A leadhead with a white berkley gulp grubtail is a killer on lingcod, then so are the swim shad style of tails, and all metal jigs.

    The beauty of jigging is you can use a lighter rod/reel, fish a 6-16 oz jig and you'll have no problem fishing all day vs. reeling a 3-5# cod sinker up and down for bait checks or replacing stripped bait. So long as a jig is near bottom and you're jigging it, you're fishing. No need to check bait, though baiting a jig can make it more effective.

    Once you jig you won't go back. But having some folks that like to soak bait on board doesn't hurt for laying down some scent for you, while you out fish them

  16. #16

    Default

    Well said, Paul.

    I forgot to include on thing.

    Bonus points for jigging? We get a fair number of kings and a lot of silvers on our jigs while chasing halibut. Not bad.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,448

    Default

    Paul
    I have a question for you. I have bought a bunch of 12,16 and 24oz jig heads and am going to get some Boneyard grubs for them. I cant wait to give them a toss. How is it that you can get away with less weight when the tide is running? You are dead on, reeling up a big sinker sucks. How deep are you fishing? We fished alot of 150ft ranges and that big sinker gets old. Any favorite colors?

  18. #18
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I must have had a brain fade on saying going to a lighter jig when the tide runs, I mean a heavier jig, head colds make coherent sentances a challenge

    Boneyard came out with a 12" chad this year.



    I just picked some up from B&J at lunch, and Tom agreed they will be a fish killer. I got some in chartreuse glitter and some in white. What I'd really like to see is a 1/2 blue glitter on the top and 1/2 white belly, I hope the boneyard guy is listening I figure I'll need at least a 1/2 doz to get started.

    For grubs I really, really like the white berkley gulp grub, good action and gulp works very well. Also think about attaching an assist hook. I've had several lings bite the grub shy of the hook. Adding a gammy or owner 12/0 octopus on 300# mono crimped to the eye on the jig and dangling towards the mid to rear of the chad or grub should do the trick!

    Several years back I was on a group charter out of Homer, we were fishing ~150 feet. I brought my jigging rod and an assortment of jigs. The bait folks were using 3# cod sinkers, I was using a 16 oz leadhead and had no problem holding bottom. I lost count of how many fish that day, and they were taking lead heads, but would be trying to hide the bait under them and I was gut hooking them. So I switched to an 8 oz diamond jig. Drop to bottom, two cranks on the reel, and on the 2nd or third jig, fish on!

    I've fished 400' out of Seward last year and had no problem holding bottom with 16 oz. Note to self, try and wait until after July 1 to bottom fish as I caught alot of ling cod that day, some real bruisers, but being mid May had to set em all free.

    I think I need to lay out some jigs and post up some pics. Since getting turned onto jigging several years back I haven't plunked bait since. You can fish all day w/o getting worn out, well unless you end up bringing up 100's of pounds of fish.

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kgpcr View Post
    Paul
    How is it that you can get away with less weight when the tide is running?
    You can get away with less weight using jigs than fishing bait because the bait is like a big parachute. It's more or less neutral density and has a lot of surface area fir drag, whether from the current or from the mere act of sinking it to the bottom. And rubber wiggletail type grubs sink slower than darts or diamonds. My rule of thumb is to use jigs weighing half what is needed to fish bait.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,448

    Default

    Thanks Paul and Brown Bear! Paul some pics would be OUTSTANDING!! I have the big bullet head Jigs like Boneyard had on their website. I wonder how the new Shad you bought would work on them. Thanks again guys!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •