Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Thermocell, bugs, & meat care??

  1. #1

    Default Thermocell, bugs, & meat care??

    I have to think some on here have some experience with these things.

    Just thinking of keeping one by the meat pole at camp when we get an animal down to help keep bugs off the meat even if they are in game bags repelling the bugs a little more couldn't hurt right??

    Anyways, how long does one repellent mat last as well how long does one butane canister last??

    Thanks for any info.

  2. #2
    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    375

    Default

    I've used them for the last 2 summers while out in remote areas, and they work very well at repelling biting bugs as long as you're downwind of it. A canister lasts about 6 hrs or so.

    Way better than bug-spray on non-mosquitos IMO. Spray has never done much for me with gnats, whitesocks, blackflies etc.

    Not sure how/if they would work on blow flies or other meat-loving bugs.
    Nice Marmot.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    When I read the instructions I remember it saying it was poison and not to use around food.
    If you’re worded about flies, I would use Golden-marpin to kill them.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rutting Moose View Post
    When I read the instructions I remember it saying it was poison and not to use around food.
    If you’re worded about flies, I would use Golden-marpin to kill them.
    Thanks, that was going to be my next question. Guess I'll just be using it to poison myself. Rather than the meat.

  5. #5
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,767

    Default Thermacell-

    They're great around your camp kitchen or on the spotting hill, to keep the skeeters and whitesox under control, but I don't think they'll do much for flies. Also they work best in still air.

    If you're shipping your gear as cargo you'll have to declare those little butane canisters as HAZMAT and pay the extra fee (around $50-$60 depending on the carrier). And you'll have to get them properly packaged for shipping. The DOT has some strict requirements for stuff like that. Don't count on finding the canisters out in the villages either.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks, Mike. Yeah I wasn't thinking of using these on flyout hunts as flyouts for me are either sheep or goat hunts where I wouldn't be bringing one of those bad boys along. If I was going to bring something like that on a flyout I'd probably just go with the misquito coil to keep the bugs at bay. But that is something to keep in mind for sure.

  7. #7
    Member AK DUX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    251

    Default

    Ditto what others have said: They work great but not sure about flies. I would also try to take them anywhere you can vs. coils. As for meat....good meat bags are probably the best thing anyway.

    BTW, if you only need fuel cells, the fuel bottles for butane curling irons are the same exact ones for the Thermacells and about half the price (and no, I don't have a butane curling iron ).
    "We're all here cuz we're not all there"

  8. #8
    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    375

    Default

    Where the heck do you get canisters for curling irons DUX?


    butane curing irons...weird...never heard that one before...
    Nice Marmot.

  9. #9
    Member AK DUX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    251

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Skookumchuck View Post
    Where the heck do you get canisters for curling irons DUX?
    butane curing irons...weird...never heard that one before...
    It's true....they have them at Fred Meyers, Walmart....I don't know what stores you have there.
    "We're all here cuz we're not all there"

  10. #10
    Charterboat Operator
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Anchorage AK.
    Posts
    1,057

    Default

    we tried them this fall at our hunting camp, in a meat shed, cool and dark, fairly tight, not sealed up though, was rather impressed with how few flies were around, there were some dead on the floor, not many, but definitly kept them at bay. had not heard of the poison thing, but we are still alive and the moose eats VERY well.
    was planning on using them again but might have to read more about the exposure to any raw meat.

  11. #11
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    Those curling irons have been around for at least 20 years now.

    Makes the little woman happy at the camp site.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    2,127

    Default What about ole vinegar

    We put down two moose on a 65 degree plus, hot, sunny, still day last year and the bugs on us were atrocious, but even worse was the detail it took to keep em off the meat. Luckily, I was hunting with a constructively anal guy who was adamant about immediately bagging the quarters and pulling the bags up and over the bone and cinching the snot out of them (bug tight). Eventually we ran out of the tallest bags and once back at camp we pulled the bags off of those ones....wacked the meat to scare any live ones out, picked out any egg masses we saw and then sprayed em down with vinegar in a squeeze bottle. Repeated the next morning over a cup of coffee and the vinegar kept em off all day despite another beautiful but bug prone day...even without bags, and they crusted up great.

    I know this is not a new idea at all, just suprised no one mentioned it yet. It only took about a quart or so to take care of things.

  13. #13
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Same theory as the citric acid many of us use. Something about the acidity that keeps the bugs at bay.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  14. #14
    Member Floridascuba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Valdez
    Posts
    191

    Default

    What about clear bags of water around it?

  15. #15
    Member wildwill's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kenai/Soldotna
    Posts
    450

    Default They are great in the field too

    We used them last year after getting two moose opening morning of archery season. Both ended up in pretty thick stuff with lots of bugs--so we used the thermacell's to keep the bugs off us and the moose while we cut and cleaned. They worked amazingly well. I keep one in each of my camp tubs, each truck and my drift boat. They work great in so many instances, and we are outside so much during the summer, we keep them handy.

    Will
    Since the World is 2/3 Water and Only 1/3 Land, Figures the Good Lord Intended I Fish More Than I Plow.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •