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Thread: Tile in a cabin

  1. #1
    Member fk 107's Avatar
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    Default Tile in a cabin

    Has anyone tiled anything in a cabin? We came across some cheap tile and looking at doing a little tile work but am worried about the condition of the grout and tile after freezing/warming many times. Anyone have any experience with this?
    "One Last Cast"

  2. #2
    RMK
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    Default flexible grout

    I'm not sure if you're talking floor tile, or wall tile? I had some floor tile and the grout did in fact crack. I replaced it with some "flexible" latex grout that the tile store sold me, and it's done better.

    Having said all that, I actually don't really care for it since it's so cold to walk on .

  3. #3
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I was thinking about doing some around my wood burning stove and up the wall. I will be watching this thread.

  4. #4
    Member fk 107's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMK View Post
    I'm not sure if you're talking floor tile, or wall tile? I had some floor tile and the grout did in fact crack. I replaced it with some "flexible" latex grout that the tile store sold me, and it's done better.

    Having said all that, I actually don't really care for it since it's so cold to walk on .

    I was kinda looking at doing some wall and floor. I like the flexible grout option. I was also thinking about the cold floor feel and also wanting to avoid that. Thanks for the info.
    "One Last Cast"

  5. #5

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    Tiled the bathroom floor 12x12's, put the electric radiant heat in the floor, I'm on sono tubes BTW, and used the Schluter Ditra underlayment (http://www.schluter.com/6_1_ditra.aspx) installed per manufacturers directions and my grout lines cracked anyways. Mainly in the center of the floor and not so much around the perimeter.

    So I'm not sold on underlayments that are meant to prevent the tile and grout lines from cracking.

  6. #6
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Cold and heat cycles don't effect tile or grout unless there is water involved. However all wood subfloors have some amount of deflection (flexing with load) and this is very hard on standard grout. The more deflection you have the smaller tile size and more flexible grout you need but itís possible to tile some pretty bendy floors with the right approach.

    Tile on walls?
    Stud type walls behind a stove are ridged and you just screw some concrete backer on and tile over it with normal grout for your joint size. If you will have the stove close to the wall itís a good idea to give Ĺ inch or more air gap behind the concrete backer to reduce transfer to combustibles.

    Horizontal log walls are tricky because they move up and down, mostly down as the logs dry and settle in though. You need to make a false wall with a slip joint to the logs so you have a stable surface to tie the backer to. The way I like is to build a stud wall with ĹĒ ply and the studs on the flat to it. Frame and sheath the back side them cut vertical slots in the ply and attach it to the logs through these slots with lags and fender washers. Lag it hard and fast to the bottom log and just snug to the others so the lag will slip as the log wall moves behind it. Then sheath off the front and treat the tile like any stud wall. Along the top you will need some kind of slip joint trim work to allow the ceiling to move or hide the relief cuts in the logs if you donít go to the ceiling.
    Andy
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  7. #7
    RMK
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    Default good advice

    Thanks AD. Mine probably cracked due to a little flex and not the cold. That would explain why the "flexible" grout was more forgiving. I ended up putting a throw rug over it anyway because it was chilly in the winter.

  8. #8
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMK View Post
    Thanks AD. Mine probably cracked due to a little flex and not the cold. That would explain why the "flexible" grout was more forgiving. I ended up putting a throw rug over it anyway because it was chilly in the winter.
    Welcome and I agree about it being too cold on toes in Alaska, bath rooms and woods is the only place I like it up here.
    Andy
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    Default

    i put 1/2 inch cement board in front of the entry way and under my wood stove and with the thought that down the road I would tile it. Many years later I still have just the cement board there. it does the fireproofing job, is much warmer than tile would be, and is flexible enough to not crack with heat and humidity changes in the structure.

    Your floor and foundation construction will largely determine the stability of your tile, as it largely will move only according to the behavior of the floor it attaches to.

    what are the joist dimensions, what spacing, how much subfloor (ply or osb?) what is your foundation, how long has the cabin been in place, do you observe substantial seasonal movement?

  10. #10
    Member atvalaska's Avatar
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    Exclamation tile it if u

    like cold feet....
    WHEN IN DOUBT> THROTTLE OUT.......

  11. #11
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I have cement board under my wood stove. It would look a lot better with tile. Easier to clean too.

  12. #12
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Default Durarock

    Is the name brand of the concrete board being talked about here. We use it in commerical construction. It is a great application in bathrooms due to it water resistance. I have used it many times in cabins behind woodstoves and on the hearth. I will say this, Make sure you use the proper screws on it. They make screws jsut for it. They have barbs that will not allow the screw to work its way out under any situation. While I would not tile a floor in a cabin it would work excellent for behind and under woodstoves. I like the 5/8's thickness. Just a bit more ummmmph than 1/2 inch. Plus if your using 5/8 rock you have no bump at seams. Just my .02
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