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Thread: Canoe stored upside down, how to 'un-warp' bottom?

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    Member KRS's Avatar
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    Default Canoe stored upside down, how to 'un-warp' bottom?

    Hey all,

    A friend gave me (read: FREE) a canoe. He stored it upside down for years.

    It's a 14' coleman plastic canoe.

    Because it was stored upside down on the bow and stern, the keel of the canoe succumbed to gravity and fell down, er.... in, er.... up. Well, it all depends on how you're looking at it.

    When the canoe is sitting upright, the middle part of the keel is several inches higher than the ends of the keel. Has anyone fixed this?

    I just put it outside in the sun on sawhorses, upright, and put some water in it to see if it'll bend back slowly.

    I'm trying to think of ways to make this serviceable.

    Thank you,

    KRS

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    Did you try just putting it in the water with some weight in it? We have a Coleman Scanoe and it has a funny shape every spring when we dig it out of the snowbank, but it always seems to straighten itself out....Louis
    Louis Knapp

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    Default Warped bottom

    ok...spooky...my intials are KRS and I am trying to figure out the exact same problem to "unwarp" a Coleman 14' plastic canoe. The canoe warped after we experienced 40 degree temps. I am going to try blocking it up and filling it with water. Then take a torch and lightly heat the bottom to get it to take it original shape. Any comments on this idea...has it been tried???

    Cheers...
    Kirk R. Smith

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    Default bent canoe

    not sure about how it is bent but if you put it on the ground up right the bow an stern is touching an the middle is off the ground if so but a 2x4 under both ends an fill the canoe with water, warmer the better it would be better if it was on a flat hard level surface like a driveway or floor, don't let it tip over on its side keep it up right an level it will bend back dont rush it
    my 2 cts

    PS one of the moderators of this site is an expert on the colman canoes [repair] he rents them out for a living

    [ALASKACANOE is his handle]

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    Member KRS's Avatar
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    Got looking a little closer, this has a false floor with foam underneath it.

    The false floor kept floating when I added water.... now I know why

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRS View Post
    Got looking a little closer, this has a false floor with foam underneath it.

    The false floor kept floating when I added water.... now I know why

    all this "water work" is not necsassary. I just fixed two large dents in some royalex with a heat gun. This method can be applied to other polyethlene, crosslink, and royalex canoes. SLOWLY applied heat will do the trick. Heat from the outside and work it back into shape. Run a strongback under the seats after the work is done. I good rugged piece of aluminum will do the trick and provide better structural rigidity. Single layer polyethlene boats are tough.....but succumb easily to various barrel can shapes.

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    I was wrong, it's a Pelican A13... oops !

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default oil can bottom

    the colemans I have and have had over the years do all have the same problem of warping bottoms.
    I do not know of any that don't have this problem.
    Dents are one thing, and warped bottoms is something very different.
    Do not worry about the oil can effect,,, on the coleman, you won't be able to fix it with heat etc.
    the reason it does this is because it is not made from laminated materials.
    Royalex is a laminated material using layers of ABS, and foam and UV protectant cover layer making it somewhat rigid and holding its form.
    the canoe that you talk about with the false floor with the foam in it,is still not laminted in a way to restrict the poly material from oil canning.
    Dents can be pushed out by using a little heat from even a hair dryer, as it does not take much temp to make it quite pliable.
    sorry I have no way to help with the oil canning of these boats, but dents are easy and like mainer said,, a little heat will help to pop them right back out..
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskacanoe View Post
    the colemans I have and have had over the years do all have the same problem of warping bottoms.
    I do not know of any that don't have this problem.
    Dents are one thing, and warped bottoms is something very different.
    Do not worry about the oil can effect,,, on the coleman, you won't be able to fix it with heat etc.
    the reason it does this is because it is not made from laminated materials.
    Royalex is a laminated material using layers of ABS, and foam and UV protectant cover layer making it somewhat rigid and holding its form.
    the canoe that you talk about with the false floor with the foam in it,is still not laminted in a way to restrict the poly material from oil canning.
    Dents can be pushed out by using a little heat from even a hair dryer, as it does not take much temp to make it quite pliable.
    sorry I have no way to help with the oil canning of these boats, but dents are easy and like mainer said,, a little heat will help to pop them right back out..
    Max

    I'm with Max on this... this canoe is an inexpensive utility boat for several reasons, yet it just so happens the misshapen lines on the boat are not only a universal characteristic of materials+design but also not a big deal breaker either way... just run 'er.

    Your canoe was meant to me used and most of 'em are left out with little concern for maintainability... hence the snowbank storage ways of doing things.

    Put too much thinkin' or effort into it would hardly be worth it.

    Mainer is also right on the don't add water... the ideas listed so far are way off and not good advice at all. Reality, these boats don't take a lot of water or any other kind of weight stresses when out of water. Wanna add some water --- throw canoe hot-tub party on your lawn or something and have fun - do not expect any meaningful repair results.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    yup.....you guys are right.....why repair something that will just keep happening again?? The barrel can shapes of single layer polyethlene boats is just something you'll have to live with and just "run er"

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    Member KRS's Avatar
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    Thanks for all of the ideas and input, I appreciate it!

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    You can't do anything about it, it's the nature of those beasts, and even if properly stored the bottoms of those canoes oil can when you use them. The hulls simply aren't stiff enough.

    On the upside, you can't argue with free, the hulls take alot of abuse, and it will be a servicable craft.

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    Thumbs up sun kills them...

    but fill with water on saw horse....carefull it will help empty and go ...a new keel line helps good to go ...u spent 150-275 on a ride.....Ride it!
    WHEN IN DOUBT> THROTTLE OUT.......

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    I used to repair those regularly after crashing them on the rivers of the Canadian Rockies.

    The polyethene plastic has a "memory" of sorts and a Heat gun will allow the material to take it's original shape. that will take out dents and warps.

    but as stated they do "oil can" something fearsome and that is a function of the material and there's not much you can do about it.

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Gonna pull on this subject for a new canoe to ask if this 'oilcanning' can be avoided by any certain method of "hanging in garage" by bow and stern for the winter or cribbing while stored?

    I actually am wondering if the new Mad River Explorer 14TT I bought in may, a 3-layer Polyethylene hull, (the TT stands for "Triple Tough", and it is Heavy Duty) will have a tendency to do this? It seems way more rigid than the Colemans of old that I think you guys are talking about but I am seriously into pre-issue avoiding the Oilcanning if I can.

    Maybe others can learn from the experiences here, "Can you avoid this by hanging inside all winter, etc?" Thanks
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    The materials and layup of the 3 layer poly boats, do hold up much better. I see lots of the old discovery boats made by Old Town and they don't seem to have much oil can problems, I do believe that storing the boat inside. is by far the very best option.... I have no opinion on right side up , or up side down storage. Other than one store right side up may provide a place for animals to build nests,,,, like squirrels etc.
    I do believe that snow load does speed up the oil can effect on the colemans though... we have maybe 5 at our place that I store on a rack outside.. I notice that a few of them have a more definite warping than the others.. they may be the ones left on top of the rack and had to bear the snow load while the others below get more protection.. I store these of course,, up side down..
    My fiberglass/ kevlar/ and royalex boats do not have any problems with warping bottoms due to snow load.
    I do not carry any of the three layer poly boats at this time though.
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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