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Thread: Latex Gloves?

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default Latex Gloves?

    Just wondering if anyone can tell me why I see alot of fishing guides on TV shows and plenty of the DVD's that i've watched wearing latex gloves?

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    Salmon smell in parts per billion. Gloves are worn to prevent unwanted scents to be transferred from your hands to the "bait".
    Last edited by iceblue; 04-24-2010 at 16:56. Reason: addd word

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Not latex... nitrile gloves. For the reasons stated by the previous caller, plus it keeps your hands clean while handling all the "dirty" stuff. And they're super cheap with a million other uses around the house and shop.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Not latex... nitrile gloves. For the reasons stated by the previous caller, plus it keeps your hands clean while handling all the "dirty" stuff. And they're super cheap with a million other uses around the house and shop.
    Yup, keeps your hands from becoming flo pink or orange when handling your cured eggs.

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    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    wheres a guy find some nitrile gloves?

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    Pharmacy or any first aid supply dealer.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Gloves play one role in my fishing.

    Protecting my hands... from bait cures, brined herring, fish slime/blood/guts, and the constant wetting and re-wetting that occurs over a day of constantly cleaning my hands.

    As for blocking the transfer of human odors to your gear/bait, it's a theory that's way overblown.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    IMO preventing transfer of odor onto bait cannot be stressed enough. It does not have to be human odor as gloves could prevent a scent or odor that was picked up in many ways like for example when you were fueling up in the morning or from medicine that you have been taking.

    Having said that there are many days that I do not wear gloves but I am constantly washing my hands with lemon joy during a day on the water and I also try to make sure to clean my lures especially after or while using bait.

    I will wear gloves more for protection when I am going through the cure process with eggs, when I am baiting frequently, or if I have a cut on my hands.

    Salmon can smell good enough to detect the various minerals and content of water to aid in the return to their stream of birth. So they can certainly smell the difference between baits and the different scents that are on them.
    Last edited by iceblue; 04-24-2010 at 19:14. Reason: added word

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    I think the whole scent blocking thing is overblown... exceedingly few of us (dare I say NONE) who use these gloves are effectively blocking the transfer of human odor.

    Here's why:

    Think about human odor the same way as human germs.

    When I go to the operating room, I am gloved and gowned in a highly choreographed ritual that ensures NONE of my germs are transferred to the patient. Once I am covered, I may not touch anything in the room that is not germ-free, including non-sterile equipment, fixtures, other people, even myself (except where I am gowned and gloved). I may not raise my hand to my mouth to cough, wipe the sweat from my brow, pick my nose, stroke my hair, adjust my seat, or readjust the inseam of my pants at the crotch, etc. Someone else in the room (who is non-sterile) must do these things for me... okay, maybe not the crotch part.

    None of us is as anal about avoiding contamination of those gloves in a fishing boat as a surgeon would be in an operating room. Not a one of us, me included... and I AM a surgeon! It's totally impractical in a real life fishing situation.

    Just think about all the things each one of you will touch in your boat with your gloved hand. You will quickly realize that you are lacing the outer surface of your gloves with human odor with almost every move you make on a typical fishing trip. Even before you start, most every one of you unknowingly reaches into that box or baggie of gloves with your odor-laden hands, lacing the entire supply with your special scent before you have even removed a single glove to cover that stinky hand. Get the point?

    The only way to minimize transferring odors with gloved hands is to wash the gloved hands with Lemon Joy immediately prior to handling bait or performing any critical task that requires handling of your bait/lure. Same goes for ungloved hands. Wash away the stink immediately BEFORE touching your bait/lure. The presence or absence of the glove becomes irrelevant.

    It's kind of like food service workers being required to wear gloves to keep your food clean. Yeah right... while they wipe the counters, change the trash, handle your dirty cash, stroke their hair, wipe their brow, scratch their ??? with the same filthy glove that doesn't get changed until they go to the bathroom.... at which point they wash their hands, and don a new pair of gloves. The only thing being protected by that glove is the worker's hand.... everything else is as filthy as if the glove were not being worn at all.

    I wear gloves while fishing for the same reason... to protect my hands from the constant wetness of handling bait, fish slime while releasing fish, slime and guts while cleaning fish, and the incessant washing and rinsing of hands all day long. Once my hands get waterlogged, they undergo a nasty change. They puff up, my fingerprints flatten out smoothe to the point of being non-existent, and the integrity of the skin layers starts to break down. My hands start to de-laminate in layers, kind of like an onion. If I let it get bad enough, like I recently did with two weeks of non-stop fishing in Alaska, I will slough 5 or 6 layers of skin over the next 1-2 weeks. I am currently on layer number four this time around. The sensation in my fingertips goes to pot, and I hardly have enough grip on them to turn a page... and no, licking my fingertips is not an option while examining patients.

    The hard part is having the discipline to start my fishing day with gloves on. Once I get a hand dirty, I wash it in the river, but now it's too wet to put on a glove. Before I know it, half the day is gone, and I have trashed my hands several times over.

    The main problem with latex gloves is they do not breathe. On a hot day, putting on gloves causes your hands to sweat profusely, even with minimal activity. keeping a glove on a sweaty hand is just as bad if not worse than repeatedly letting it get wet without a glove.... same result, water-logged hand! So on a hot day, plan on burning thru many pairs of gloves, allowing your hands to come up for air to dry out between "latex saunas" every hour or so.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    Question Avoid the stink finger?

    Wow Doc, and to think I have spent the better part of my life trying to get stinky fingers!

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    The only time I worry about smells is when I am Ice fishing. A little smelly jelly or bait on an Ice fly and thats the extent. I do bring rubber gloves for my wife and any other ladies that want them. Dogs have great sense of smell but some of them still eat their own crap.

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    Default Lemon Joy?

    This product has been mentioned a couple of times in this thread. Anything particular about it that makes it a good choice for hand clean up?

    I wonder if the lemon scent wouldn't get imparted to your bait/tackle just as easily?


    - Jay

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    Wow Doc, and to think I have spent the better part of my life trying to get stinky fingers!

    Holy cow. coffee out the nose moment. Nice on bush
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

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    IMO gloves are just another tool. A useful tool at times but still one that if not used properly will not do you much good.

    Those that use eggs to fish for salmon fully realize how HUGE scent is and how the "hot" scent can vary from day to day. I have seen times when if you were not fishing eggs that had that "hot" scent of the hour then you were simply not getting bit as often as those that were dialed in so to speak. I know guides that use four to six batches of eggs a day with different scents & cures in each and experiment until they find the right one for that situation. This seems overkill to me but the point is that they believe so much in the just the right scent that they go to this extreme day in and day out.

    Lemon Joy keeps things clean and fish do not seem to mind its scent. Not sure why but I do know that it does not hurt to use it.

    I will go back to the fact that salmon smell in parts per billion. They can smell the difference between a clean lure or one that has residue on it from when you used it last season and did not clean it before you put it away. They can tell the difference between a bait with sardine oil in it and one that is being run without it. If you touch a bad scent and then handle bait it will transfer a scent but the kicker is how long will that bad scent stay on your bait? Probably not very long but who wants to take that chance if you can avoid it?

    One purpose of the gloves is for protection for your hands. Another is to prevent the spread of an unwanted scent. For example, I NEVER fuel my boat without using gloves. When I am done fueling I then throw away the gloves and get out a new pair when I am ready to bait up again.

    .

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    Member oldmil007's Avatar
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    Default OK, might of figured it out for myself...

    Quote Originally Posted by oldmil007 View Post
    This product has been mentioned a couple of times in this thread. Anything particular about it that makes it a good choice for hand clean up?

    I wonder if the lemon scent wouldn't get imparted to your bait/tackle just as easily?


    - Jay
    Here's a little Maine humor for ya :

    So, there's a considerable amount of lobstering that takes place here in Maine and a considerable number of folks who like eating steamed lobsters. The process involves chucking a freshly caught live lobster into boiling water for about 10 minutes. They're done when they turn red or whenever the lobster pot boils over onto the top of the stove for the third time, whichever comes first.



    Now, unfortunately, this process weighs heavily on the sensitivities of a certain segment of people who consider this somewhat barbaric and an actual affront to the dignity of life of said lobster.

    To which, most folks from Maine reply, "Naw, it don't hurt 'em at all. We've been boiling lobsters for hundreds of years, they're used to it."


    So I guess the point to be taken is that folks have been squeezing lemon juice on fish for a long while too, so maybe the salmon are used to it too.

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    Default Thanks Doc

    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post
    Gloves play one role in my fishing.

    Protecting my hands... from bait cures, brined herring, fish slime/blood/guts, and the constant wetting and re-wetting that occurs over a day of constantly cleaning my hands.

    As for blocking the transfer of human odors to your gear/bait, it's a theory that's way overblown.
    From your mouth to God's ears....I get tired of all the other reasons, they are like ears and whiskers on deer hair mice...for the client's benefit only.

    I think it's completely ok to not want pink and shriveled hands until August.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I hate eating after I've handled salmon eggs, my hands smell for days, yuck
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Default Buying the gloves...

    Saw them in a Harbor Freight store today...

    Rosenberg/Florida
    "Two decades researching and defining fishing opportunities in the Last Frontier!"


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    I have several pairs of processors gloves I buy from the cannery here. They're very durable and at a couple bucks/pair they're cheap protection from cold water, stinky baits, halibut teeth, sculpin/bullhead yuck factor and fish slime.
    Now what ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    wheres a guy find some nitrile gloves?
    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Pharmacy or any first aid supply dealer.
    I think those two would probably rank among the more expensive places to buy nitrile gloves. Try Lowe's or Home Depot, in the paint department. If you're in or near Anchorage, poke your head in Anchorage Restaurant Supply on Eagle St. They also carry a lot of vinyl gloves but I'd steer clear of them because they tear far too easily. You might also check Sally Beauty Supply, which is open to the public unlike most other salon supply shops. But if you're married to a licensed hairdresser like I am, see if she'll pick some up for ya.

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