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Thread: Homer tides

  1. #1
    Member idakfisher's Avatar
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    Default Homer tides

    I have not fished out of Homer before, but I want to start this year. Searching the threads about the tides, I gather that the best times to fish for halibut are a couple of hours both sides of slack tides-high or low tides. And it is best to avoid the minus tides. The question is: if you have several days of minus tides in a row, should you avoid those days entirely, or will fishing around the high tides those days be fine anyway? And for those who fish out of Seward, do the tides effect the halibut fishing for you?

    Do you guys fine a real coordination with the picture of a little fish (meaning a minus tide) and a big fish in the tide books?

    Thanks, Randy

  2. #2
    Member Waldo2382's Avatar
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    I fish when ever I can. It sure beats being at work. The bigger tide swings don't give as big a window to fish the bottom...at least easily. On the smaller tide swings, sometimes you can easily fish all day with better chances of getting a lunker. With the big tides, just get it done quicker and then move on to something else like trolling for salmon.

  3. #3
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    The only reason people avoid the big swings (high highs down to a minus) is that it makes it hard to keep your bait on the bottom. If you use enough lead, you can fish any tide you want. The slack space is popular mostly because you can use less weight and get your bait to hold position.
    Winter is Coming...

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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    You need enough current to get the fish biting but not too much. As the time comes in is generally a good time to be fishing.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  5. #5

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    All those little fish in the tide book means is you can keep your bait down there without using as much lead. Some people seem to think halibut won't bite when the tide is moving.

    I've caught halibut on big swing days, small swing days and all different times during those days. If you have a big tidal swing you just find a place where the tidal influences aren't as great, or use more lead. And when it's "slack" you will just have it that much easier.

    Halibut are aggressive foragers and they won't stop eating just because the tide is moving or slack. I caught a nice little 40 pounder today about an hour and a half after high slack off the Bluffs in K-Bay. And then another about 10 minutes later. I only kept the first one. They didn't seem to mind the tidal movement. Here's a pic.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Fishing will be fine on the minus tide days, some folks say that the fishing can be as good or better as the heavy tide changes move around the bait fish and thus the halibut feed more agressively.

    The effect on the fisherman is your fishing window is shorter. You still have a slack low and high tide, you just need to make sure the boat is on the fishing hole during the slack tide.

    When the tide starts ripping, just reel up and wait out the rip.

  7. #7
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    You need current. When there is little current for the day, meaning there isn't alot of tidal movement, the fish don't bite worth a darn. I'd rather have a tiny amount of time to fish than a whole day of slack.

    You can attract some big fish while waiting for the tide to slow down too.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by pike_palace View Post
    You need current. When there is little current for the day, meaning there isn't alot of tidal movement, the fish don't bite worth a darn.
    I can assure you, halibut will bite any time they see a tasty morsel in front of them. Halibut are an incredibly aggressive predator fish and they couldn't care less if the tide is moving or not. If you're in a spot where there are halibut they aren't going to suddenly stop feeding because there isn't any current. I fish halibut at least 2 or 3 days a week from spring until winter and I've caught them at slack and everywhere in between.

  9. #9
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    I remember one day in 2008 when there were some very flat tides, and even the charter guys were having a hard time getting fish. We caught nothing. This was out of homer.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  10. #10
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Like Joat said, slack tide only allows fishing with less weight. We have caught halibut at all times of the day and tide times. One thing I have paid close attention to is on my hand held GPS, there is a feature that tells me the best times to hunt and fish. Its based on the moon phase and position I believe. It gives me a best time and good time to fish, at about 2 hours windows. Those times have been spot on. That is the only thing I use that complicated Megellan Meridian Gold for. Its not user friendly like a Garmin at all.

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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    pike palace---I am listening and you are giving misinformation that must be corrected because it is incorrect. ."
    I gave an opinion based upon SEVERAL days of fishing flat tides. I know I mentioned only one, but I have fished several times with very flat tides, and personally I don't care for it. I've caught more than my fair share of nice fish and not ONE came on a day without some good current. So no, it's incorrect. It's my own opinion whether you like it or not.

    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    The logic and methodology you present below---"One day in 2008 when there were some very flat tides"---is about like saying I went out one day on the Kenai and I didn't catch any kings and it was raining that day so it must be bad to fish for kings on days that it's raining. If you are going to present a fact, back it up with some sort of evidence that supports that fact and not some "opinion" that is totally without merit. That's what I am doing. I'm not being boastful, just presenting a fact that is supported by careful methodology.."
    Do you really believe I would be ignorant enough to make a solid fishing opinion based on ONE day of fishing? I've played the game before, and every trip for every species is different. I should've mentioned that this conclusion came after SEVERAL days of fishing. The one day I mentioned was when I saw numerous charters, guys I've fished with personally, out till 5 in the afternoon trying to get their clients a limit.

    I
    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    halibut will indeed bite when there is no current. That's not an opinion. An opinion is, "I like it better when the halibut are biting."
    I also believe when the tides are very flat Halibut swim off the bottom and while most people, like myself, are fishing on the bottom the fish may not be there. I don't know, maybe you could explain that too, since obviously none of us here are up to par with your knowledge of the saltwater.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Arguments

    Guys, this should not be a big argument and pissing match. Everyone has their own opinions on fishing and they are just that, opinions. We can choose to accept or reject any imformation that we read on the WWW. No need to argue, just go fishing and try it yourself to find out if it works for you. If it works, fine let us know.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    I can assure you, halibut will bite any time they see a tasty morsel in front of them. Halibut are an incredibly aggressive predator fish and they couldn't care less if the tide is moving or not. If you're in a spot where there are halibut they aren't going to suddenly stop feeding because there isn't any current. I fish halibut at least 2 or 3 days a week from spring until winter and I've caught them at slack and everywhere in between.

    Back to this post, as their are a few things I take issue with.

    I happen to know that nice sized halibut don't feed 24 hours a day. If that was the case, they'd be stuffed full of rockfish, crabs, shrimp,salmon, eels, ect.. I've cut open more than a few stomachs, and more than a few of those stomachs were empty, or just had a few shrimp in them. Others were actively feeding and will have plenty of food in their stomachs. They do feed on certain tides and they can be very very picky. Certain colors, bait, and presentations seem to trigger strikes when other "tasty morsels" fail to get bites. One year, NOTHING could out fish a rootbeer colored grub, for halibut. Nothing. That is the reality of halibut fishing. And yes, I know my tides and I know what halibut spots I want to be on in certain tides. But I'm smart like that.

  14. #14
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    Default Homer Tides?

    Wow, that's gonna be hard to get back to after all the recent hulabaloo about who knows what,bla bla bla etc.
    I'll give it my best effort though. As with anything to do with tides a certian amount of "predicting" is in order and my prediction is that we'll see the tide going out on this thread soon! I learned a long time ago that you don't make yourself look good by making the other guy look bad. I also agree that we need to get along, especially those who rely on "word of mouth" for their customer base. One thing these forums do is give the world a look into your "window" and as big as Alaska is, it's really pretty much a bo dunk kind of place as anybody who's anybody knows or knows of anybody who's anybody
    A forum I frequented quite a long time ago had a section titled "the bilge". You were warned ahead of time that it may be offensive and to enter at your own risk. Well, I entered often because being of a socially predacious nature I enjoyed some of the banter. Along the way I got a good look at the personallities and it was real easy to cipher what was what. The same thing holds true here, they come and go, some of their own accord and some with a little help from the management!

    I have to tip my hat to those managers too as they seem to know just how much is enough, that's gotta be a hard job in itself.
    Mike

  15. #15
    Member idakfisher's Avatar
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    Default homer tides

    It sure is great to have a "GOOD CONVERSATION". Actually, it is very interesting to see how different opinions are argued.

    So, what I am getting from this is that halibut can be caught on ANY tide, high or low, minus tides and plus tides-I guess that the location can make a difference. The bigger halibut want some movement to bring the bait to them and though you can catch them at slack tide, that may not be a prime time. Big tides are going to create more current, which means less fishing time or heavier weight to keep the bait on the bottom. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong.

    So, if the tide picks up, would it be a good idea to move into the lee of an Island or maybe a current edge to be able to keep fishing?

    I do thank you guys for sharing what you know.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by idakfisher View Post
    It sure is great to have a "GOOD CONVERSATION". Actually, it is very interesting to see how different opinions are argued.

    So, what I am getting from this is that halibut can be caught on ANY tide, high or low, minus tides and plus tides-I guess that the location can make a difference. The bigger halibut want some movement to bring the bait to them and though you can catch them at slack tide, that may not be a prime time. Big tides are going to create more current, which means less fishing time or heavier weight to keep the bait on the bottom. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong.

    So, if the tide picks up, would it be a good idea to move into the lee of an Island or maybe a current edge to be able to keep fishing?

    I do thank you guys for sharing what you know.
    Yeah, essentially if the halibut are hungry they will bite. So don't ever stop fishing just because of what the tide is doing unless you just can't fish. As you can see there are widely differing ideas about when the best time to fish is in terms of tide movement. There are people that firmly believe that the best time to fish is when the biggest tidal movement is. And the opposite holds true as well.

    Kachemak Bay and Cook Inlet have a lot of different places you can "hide" from big currents and moving into those spots when the tide is moving can be advantageous. A lot of times halibut will hang out where the tide is passing by and pick off bait as it gets washed past. Good places for this are, as you say, in the lee of an island or current edge. Another good spot is where there is a good dropoff. The halibut will suspend below the dropoff where the current isn't as strong and pick off bait as it passes over the edge.

    BTW---don't neglect the possibility of actually trolling for halibut. I have caught a ton of halibut while trolling for salmon and actually have a number of underwater videos I've shot of halibut coming up in 90 ft. of water and grabbing a herring I was trolling around 30 ft. down from the surface. They are very aggressive predators!

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