Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Retaining wall designs

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    6

    Default Retaining wall designs

    Does anyone have any ideas for a retaining wall design? I'm leaning towards treated wood.
    I have quite a height difference so I'm going to have to build 2 walls (terracing I guess you could say), and their heights are going to be 4 to 5 feet.
    Should I include deadman anchors?
    Should I sink the posts in sono tubes?
    Any info you have or if you know where I could find scrap materials to save some $$ would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    The demonstration I watched a year or so ago used deadman anchors, and used a vertical lay-out, as opposed to a sloping grade.

    I need to do a couple of intersecting retainer walls that form a 90 degree angle, with both halves of the two-part wall being on a slope, as well as a separate vertical in another location.

    The treated RR ties will likely work well for the vertical application, (using deadman anchors intermittently in the stack as it rises), but with the sloping walls I'm considering embedding -large- tailings or river rock over tipar (spelling?) for a rock garden effect of sorts, though I'm not positive that'll work.

    If there's any risk of water gathering at the bottom of the wall as a result of run-off from above, and either gathering in a stagnant pool or traveling somewhere you don't want saturated or compromised, my understanding is that completely wrapping some stout perforated pvc/abs drain pipe (as would be used in a septic drain field) in the same fabric (tipar) and trenching it into the base of the drop, within a surrounding of gravel, and applying a 1/8" drop per lineal foot to the desired drainage location.

  3. #3
    Member TR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    391

    Default

    I'm thinking about building a slopped wall to my garden area. I can get railroad ties cheap but I've read about some bad things concerning creosote and edible plants. Can any one confirm?

  4. #4
    Member grcg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    112

    Default kinda icky

    Yeah, the preservatives in railroad ties are carcinogenic and have heavy metals in them. not so good for you.

    I was looking at the same problem. I wanted to use concrete blocks. Some folks say they will leach lime into your soil, but I figured, since our soil tends to be so acidic anyway, it would be fine. But I couldn't afford it.

    I ended up using metal roofing seconds. I really like how mine turned out. But I would be hesitant to use it in a situation where I was terracing a hill. But, it might be a lower cost alternative to get the structure in place until you could save up for the other material that you wanted.

    Here's a link to some previous discussion
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=65527

    good luck!!
    Last edited by grcg; 05-04-2010 at 18:14. Reason: edit grammar

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    I agree.

    Using RR ties near a garden? No.

    Using RR ties in a location that won't effect edible plants or drinking water? Yes.

    You could also use what we use on our raised garden beds; spruce poles. I suspect they'd work best in a terraced situation, rather than trying to use them to restrain a whole lot of weight. (Where our home is located, we have LOTS of silt, and when silt becomes wet, it becomes semi-gelatinous, making it able to 'migrate' downhill with the moisture/run-off.

    I wouldn't try to restrain a whole lot of vertical height and weight with mere spruce poles in those sorts of circumstance, but to terrace nice incremental rises might work o.k..)

    The spruce poles in our raised garden beds are typically good for 7-10 years, and then they need to be replaced. But with a terraced retaining wall, unless you plant in the terraced areas, you're not likely to keep the soil there as moist as you would for a gadren bed, so in the right climate, they might last longer.. .

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •