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Thread: Good Tips

  1. #1
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Default Good Tips

    In the spirit of H.G. Tappley's "Tap's Tips" that used to run in Field & Stream magazine, please post a helpful hint.

    I offer the following...
    Mountain hunters:
    Bring a small bow saw and flagging tape on the hike in. When you hit the alder band drop your pack and cut a path through. Once you make your way through flag the opening. This will save you effort on the way up and make your return safer.

    Trekking poles easily convert to shooting sticks by looping each wrist strap over the hand grip of the other pole. As the poles are splayed out the straps will catch on the bottom of the hand grip forming a nice stable notch.

    Before pitching your tent (assuming the gound isn't too wet) lay down and test the spot for lumps and bumps. Make any adjustments BEFORE you pitch the tent.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  2. #2

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    Tap's tips? I guess I am not the only old guy here. What about Ted Trueblood? "Never put your knife down, or you will lose it".

  3. #3
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Soak cotton balls in vaseline and store in a film container for a quick and long burning fire starter.
    BK

  4. #4
    Member MaxBaglimit's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jim in anchorage View Post
    Tap's tips? I guess I am not the only old guy here. What about Ted Trueblood? "Never put your knife down, or you will lose it".
    Yup, amazing how a knife can just turn invisible when placed on the ground.

  5. #5
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Stay in a Motel 6, they leave the lights on.

  6. #6
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default My Tip

    AND, I do remember both Taps Tips and Ted Trueblood (as well as Jack O'Connor and all the others). In fact, I got most of my hunting knowledge from reading magazines.

    My tip? Never pitch your tent in a low spot.

    Second tip? Always carry a compass and know how to use it.

    After reading one response - I have often laughed at small items (radios & knives come to mind) in camo. For me, a sure recipe for "lost".

    So my third tip? NEVER buy anything small that is camo.

  7. #7

    Thumbs up

    Let your eyes do the walking.

    Be patient.

    Always have your weapon at the ready. Always.

    Hunt Early and Late.

    Learn everything you can about your quarry, before going afield.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  8. #8
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    Smile

    Yes, I spent 2 hours looking for camo binoculars on a hillside once. But that wasnt as bad as looking for two hours for my camo pack on a hillside on a sheep hunt. The cover made it look just like all the rocks. I think a piece of orange or blue surveyors tape on the top of your pack and on the binoculars would be a smart thing.
    I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. Fred Bear

  9. #9
    Member AkGreg's Avatar
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    Default great thread

    redundancy redundancy redundancy.... find those items that are VITAL to your survival/hunt and know how you will fix it in the event it breaks or gets lost BEFORE you're in the middle of nowhere....

    How do you improvise broken tent poles, lost maps and compasses, mechanical failures etc...

    Also, as mentioned above, ALWAYS have your weapon at the ready... ALWAYS... even if your "just going right over there" and you get jumped by a pissed off grizz (read learn the hard way here)

    Greg

  10. #10

    Default Electrical tape

    Put a few wraps around the handle of your knife. You will be surprised how often you use it. Especially after you slice your hand open and you need to make a bandage (yup, more than once. my left hand looks like it has been through a meat grinder...).

  11. #11
    Member AKHunterNP's Avatar
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    Default

    Pick up the May issue of Outdoor Life. This month has a feature "101 outdoor tips". Some are good, some won't work here and some are just plain stupid but there are a few that may be helpful. Here's one that I've used that is in that article, use the lint from your dryer for a fire starter.
    "...arms like laws discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe...Horrid mischief would ensue were the good deprived of the use of them." -Thomas Paine

  12. #12
    Member akguy454's Avatar
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    Default keys

    I hide my keys somewhere on my truck and inform anyone that I am hunting with the location so if something happens they dont have to search for them. Also they can't get lost in the field that way. Also tie my 4 wheeler key to my handle bar. If I ever take it out I tie it to my belt, but seldom take it out. Also have a piece of 550 cord on my gps to make a necklace out of it so I can let it dangle and leave it on and still have my hands free for gun, poles etc.

    Also keep everything in the same spot in your pack so you can find it in the dark as needed.

    Also keep a large spot light for things that go bump in the night.

  13. #13
    Member Trappnguns's Avatar
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    Default Stealing this

    From another thread on here.....

    Put retro tape on everything. A little light in the dark and you will know exactly where your stuff is.

  14. #14
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    Default what he said

    I'm not sure what retro tape is, but sounds like Trappnguns was talking about putting reflective tape on stuff. I'll second that. A buddy lost a camo gps last year. By the grace of God I found it. It would have been easier to just come back in the dark and shine for it.
    DOT tape used on commercial trucks and trailers is expensive but works dandy!
    Another tape tip is to wrap duct tape or electrical tape around your external backpack frame.
    Keep your compass and a broadhead wrench on the same lanyard and wear them. They'll always be handy.
    Get the little Princeton Tec bug flashlights that clip on to zippers. Put one in your backpack, day bag, coat, and key to the boat or 4-wheeler. You'll always have a light when you need it.

  15. #15
    Member Trappnguns's Avatar
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    Default

    Retro tape = Retroreflective tape...

    Exactly!!

  16. #16
    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    Default How 'bout these?

    If you plan on hunting late, take a nap in the afternoon. Makes waking up early a lot easier.

    The extra batteries you remembered to bring for the GPS won't help much when the GPS takes a tumble onto a rock. Bring a map and compass, and practice using them before you find yourself needing to use them.

    Wear comfortable boots.

    You can never drink too much water. Refill the ol' canteen whenever you have the opportunity. This is especially true in the mountains.

    Bring some entertainment, even if it's just a deck of cards (I prefer adding a compact cribbage board). There's not much worse than waiting out a three day monsoon with nothing to do but stare out the tent window and listen to your buddy's "biggest fish ever" story for the 73rd time.

    Always keep a bore cleaner with you (a rod and brush/patches, or a boresnake). The cleaning kit you have back at camp won't help when you accidentally poke the muzzle into the mud three miles out.

    Getting familiar with your weapon shouldn't happen while it's pointing at an animal. Likewise, spending quality time with your weapon is more than firing three shots at a sheet of plywood two days before your trip just to "make sure she's still sighted in from last year".

    Don't be afraid to get off the four wheeler.
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you cant tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  17. #17
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Default

    To add to Rod's, during the off time learn to whittle.

    I also learned to do a four braid kinda thing with some cord, build williow furniture, build lean-to's, etc.

    The thing is, is to have fun out there, a little fun time in the off hour's.

  18. #18
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Default

    Here's a tip for hunting Kodiak.

    If you run out of water away from camp you can get water easily from any of the hundreds of trickles that seem to run down every mountainside on the island. Take a stalk of pushki and use it as a spigot as shown in the attached pic
    Attached Images Attached Images
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  19. #19
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    Default Rescue tape

    carry a roll of rescue tape in your pack, it will help with some repairs, I always carry quick ties too.

  20. #20
    Member lynch's Avatar
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    Default

    If you are out bird hunting and wish you had a slug for bear protection you can turn a load of bird shot into a slug. About an inch above the bottom of the brass on the shot shell make several short cuts around the shell, leaving only a few very small places attached in a circle. When fired the plastic hull above the cut will separate from the lower part of the hull. Then the upper hull section, wad and shot will stay together and act as a slug when fired.

    Also I agree with an earlier post about always packing your pack the same way every time. I would extend this to keeping every thing in the same place on every hunt, pants pockets, shirt pockets, etc. Not only will it make finding things easier in the dark but you might make less noise in close proximity of game if instead of fumbling for things you can go straight to your gear, range finder, shells, call, etc.
    "Bark,bark,bark,sniff,sniff,bark,and bark" - Lynchs Blue Roan Lynch E.C.K.

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