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Thread: Goats

  1. #1
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    Default Goats

    What is considered a good goat in inches for a billy and nanny.

    Terry

  2. #2
    Member Kotton's Avatar
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    Well my biggest is 10" with six inch bases one point of from the book.I think a 9" Billy is a good goat.I have heard about a Nannie that was 14" but very skinny horned.

  3. #3
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    for a billy 9.5" is a decent one, but 10 is better still.....for nannies, well, im not sure....dont think it matters on a nanny, just be happy with what you got



    Release Lake Trout

  4. #4
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Default Goats

    Biggest goat you're gonna get is still going to be a spiker.

  5. #5
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    I always thought the horns were kind of tough no matter how long I cooked them :-)

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    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    i know right, but man if you boil them horns for quite a while, they turn ebony black and super shiny, pretty cool looking...........



    Release Lake Trout

  7. #7
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    An 8 inch billy is like a 50 inch bull moose...

    When your judging them if the horns appear to be about as long as the distance from the eyes to the nostrils he's a mature goat and a shooter.

    If you're looking to make B&C he should generally be at least 9 inches.

    The way to tell a billy's horns from a nanny's at spotting scope distances is wait until the goat looks in your general direction and focus on the bases. Nanny horns tend to be slender at the base and jet black where they meet the skull whereas billy horns tend to flare out more abruptly. They have an almost triangular appearance, and they tend to have an ashen color close to the skull.

    Another way to tell from afar is color. If there is snow billies will appear creamy or yellowish against it. Supposedly they wallow in their own urine like elk but I don't know that for a fact. Nannies aren't perfectly white either but they are whiter than billies.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  8. #8
    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default The horns are tough but...............

    they make the best gravy :-)

    Seriouslly! For me Mountain Goats are all about the hair. The later you hunt them the better. A large bodied goat in his winter coat is an awesome trophy, horn size have some impact but I will take a late Oct. 9" Billy over a mid August 10" Billy everytime.
    I have a couple mounted pictures in my albums.

  9. #9
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default other uses

    They make cool knives too. Size doesn't matter for this application because the base gets shaved away.

    10" Billy is a trophy. I also like to consider the age important too. One of these knives was from a 9.5 yr old goat and he was cool.

    Goat judging is very, very difficult once you get way up the mountain and you've been climbing all day long.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    Wow, Bighorse.

    Those knives are sharp on both ends!

    Pretty, though...

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